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Global Disability Summit 2018 - Summary of commitments

August 2018

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The key objective of the Global Disability Summit was to deliver ambitious new global and national level commitments on disability inclusion. National governments and other organisations made 170 sets of commitments around the four central themes of the Summit (ensuring dignity and respect for all, inclusive education, routes to economic empowerment and harnessing technology and innovation), as well as the two cross-cutting themes (women and girls with disabilities and conflict and humanitarian contexts), and data disaggregation.

 

Commitments made can be viewed in full on: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/global-disability-summit-commitments

 

United Nations Global Sustainable Development Report 2016

Uinted Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA)
July 2016

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This report was prepared to inform the discussions at the high-level political forum (HLPF) on sustainable development in 2016. The theme chosen for the HLPF is "ensuring that no one is left behind". The report builds on GSDR2014 and GSDR2015. The approach is of an assessment of assessments, documenting and describing the landscape of information on specific issues or nexuses of issues. Specifically, the report keeps the ‘science-policy interface’ and ‘SDGs as integrated system’ as main threads. Main topics include: ensuring that no one is left behind and the 2030 Agenda; the infrastructure – inequality – resilience nexus; perspectives of scientists on technology and the SDGs; inclusive institutions for sustainable development; and identification of emerging Issues for sustainable development. An annex addresses persons with disabilities specifically, highlighting their over-representation in the "furthest behind".

Including people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts

OOSTERHOFF, Pauline
KETT, Maria
November 2014

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This issue focuses on the inclusion of people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts and concludes that “more must be done to ensure the needs and rights of people with disabilities are fully recognised in disaster risk reduction and emergency responses. Accelerating progress will require inclusive humanitarian programming and the use of technological solutions to be effectively promoted and incentivised, and people with disabilities and their organisations to be involved from the outset in the design and implementation of policies and programmes”

IDS Rapid Response Briefing 8

Where can design have the greatest impact in the next five years?

CASEY, Valerie
Ed
April 2014

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This special 100th journal issue focuses on women, design and social impact. The concept of "Design for all" is that the starting point should be the needs of people with activity limitation, such as physical, sensory and mental or cognitive limitation, and spaces, buildings and products should be designed to be accessible to all without losing the aesthetic or adding to cost.

The Journal contains 10 short essays by designers addressing issues such as: the need to assess the requirements of users first; exploring the political and social aspects of design; the responsibilities of designers; design as a problem solving tool;design to improve the lives of the poorest; sustainability; development; technology; and the environment

Design For All Journal​, Vol 9, No 4 

United Nations expert meeting on building inclusive societies and development through promotion of accessible information and communication technologies (ICTs) : emerging issues and trends

UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS (UNDESA)
UNITED NATIONS INFORMATION CENTER
THE NIPPON FOUNDATION
2012

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This report is the outcome of a United Nations Expert Group Meeting (EGM) consisting of plenary and working group sessions. Presentations and discussions on issues and trends in accessible and usable information and communications technologies (ICTs) and development are provided. The working groups recommendations include: (1) policy frameworks and institutional arrangements to promote accessible and usable ICTs, (2) accessibility technologies and technical standards and (3) accessible and usable ICTs in disaster responses and emergency situations
United Nations expert meeting on building inclusive societies and development through promotion of accessible information and communication technologies (ICTs) : emerging issues and trends
Tokyo, Japan
19-21 April 2012

Summary and policy implications vision 2030 : the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
UNITED KINGDOM DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
2009

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This resource summarises the evidence for the impact of climate change on water and sanitation technologies in the near to medium term. It aims to help policy makers, planners, operators and communities in making practical decisions based on clear criteria, to improve the resilience of their water and sanitation services. It is part of a larger set of materials, including a full technical report and a set of background reports and guidance notes

Global health watch 2005-2006 : an alternative world health report

LEMA, Claudia
et al
2005

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This report is the result of a collaboration of leading popular movements, NGOs, activists, academics and health workers. It provides an evidence-based analysis of the political economy of health and health care and challenges policies and initiatives of global organisations including the World Bank, the World Health Organization and UNICEF. Many key issues relevant to health are covered, including health care services and systems, health of vulnerable groups, climate change, food and water, education, armed conflicts. Part E also provides and assessment of the impact global institutions, transnational corporations and rich countries. This report is a call for action, directed to health workers and activists and national and international policy-makers

Good practice paper on ICTs for economic growth and poverty reduction

BATCHELOR, Simon
SCOTT, Nigel
et al
2005

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This report aims to give an overview of what DAC members currently know about how information and communication technology (ICT) use in developing economies can stimulate economic growth and poverty reduction. It draws attention to the cross-cutting applications of ICTs, to their role as tools, not goals, and links their use to development co-operation

Promoting the application of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. UNCTAD
April 2004

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This paper places ICT in a broad perspective of science and technology. The report seeks to identify approaches for the effective promotion and use of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration (MDGs). It particularly emphasises that academia/government/industry partnerships are essential in order to build scientific and technological capabilities and to foster market-oriented policies and developments; and that access to new and emerging technologies is imperative

ICT, PRSPs, and MDGs

BANURI, Tariq
October 2003

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This paper considers the dissemination of ICT within various conceptual frameworks, calling for approaches that start with the needs and desires of poor people for information. It is strongly illustrated with examples from India and Pakistan. Banuri then turns to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and to the potential of ICT to support progress in meeting these goals. Finally, he criticises governments for lack of a coherent, human development-based ICT policy emphasizing the MDGs, while suggesting that civil society has done better

Perspectives on disability, poverty and technology : a report to Healthlink Worldwide and GIC Ltd

ALBERT, Bill
MCBRIDE, Rob
SEDDON, David
September 2002

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This paper sets out an approach to disability and development based on the social model of disability. It states that national and international statistics on the incidence of physical and/or mental impairment provides a partial and often misleading notion of the social reality of disability in developing countries. They should therefore not be used to gauge the needs of disabled people or to estimate the costs or benefits of programmes. The paper argues for the need to formulate an integrated strategy towards disability and development. It recommends that specific criteria be adopted for judging project concept notes and proposals and makes recommendations regarding the choice and weighting of criteria. It also provides a set of recommendations for: DFID in general; DFID in relation to its Disability Knowledge and Research (KaR) programme; the Disability KaR programme managers; further work to be undertaken

Crowdsourced briefs

UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFIARS (UNDESA)

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“Crowdsourced briefs are inputs received from the scientific community around the world, highlighting a specific issue, finding, or research with a bearing on sustainable development in its three dimensions - economic, social and environment - or the inter-linkages between them. The briefs are required to be factual and based on peer-reviewed literature, focusing on the review of up-to-date findings relating to a particular issue, or presenting solutions to a problem or challenge. Key messages from the current scientific debate are normally highlighted for the attention of policy-makers. Selected briefs could be featured in the Global Sustainable Development Report to be reviewed by policy makers at the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development”

Technology justice : a call to action

MEIKLE, Amber

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This publication presents the concept of Technology Justice and the case for radical and urgent action to achieve it. It provides an insight into three key global technology injustices, using example cases from different countries and sectors to explore various drivers of this injustice. These Include: why the poor cannot access or use the essential technologies that others take for granted; how misuse and overuse of technologies is damaging the environment we live in now, and stacking up problems for future generations; how technological innovation often contributes to these injustices, and fails to focus on solving the most pressing social and environmental challenges we face. The report ends with a call to action, outlining the need for change

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