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Challenges to principled humanitarian action: Perspectives from four countries.

NORWEGIAN REFUGEE COUNCIL
Handicap International
July 2016

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The purpose of this paper is to contribute to an increased understanding of the perceived and actual challenges humanitarians face in operational contexts as they apply the principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence. A snapshot is provided of four case studies; Colombia, Nepal, northern Syria and South Sudan. Through a combination of field research, headquarters interviews, desk research, and a webinar, views and observations are presented from the humanitarian community. These observations provide a glimpse into the challenges faced by principled humanitarians. As a result the paper puts forward seven recommendations intended to assist humanitarians and states to sharpen tools and strengthen approaches when implementing principled humanitarian protection and assistance. An addendum to this study provides perspectives from selected members of the donor community. This research was conducted through interviews with state representatives in Geneva, aiming to understand how donors perceive their responsibilities in upholding the humanitarian principles and the Good Humanitarian Donorship Principles. This final chapter highlights challenges faced by states while supporting principled humanitarian action, particularly in conflict zones. On the basis of this research, additional recommendations for both states and humanitarians are proposed to strengthen the adherence to the humanitarian principles

Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. DRAFT for the 69th World Health Assembly

World Health Organisation (WHO)
May 2016

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This report was presented to Member States at the World Health Assembly in May 2016 and is to be read in conjunction with A69/38: Draft global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. Report by the Secretariat. The vision of this work and report is to "Accelerate progress towards universal health coverage and the UN Sustainable Development Goals by ensuring equitable access to health workers within strengthened health systems". Objectives are "To optimise performance, quality and impact of the health workforce through evidence-informed policies on human resources for health, contributing to healthy lives and well-being, effective universal health coverage, resilience and strengthened health systems at all levels",  "To align investment in human resources for health with the current and future needs of the population and of health systems, taking account of labour market dynamics and education policies; to address shortages and improve distribution of health workers, so as to enable maximum improvements in health outcomes, social welfare, employment creation and economic growth", "To build the capacity of institutions at sub-national, national, regional and global levels for effective public policy stewardship, leadership and governance of actions on human resources for health" and "to strengthen data on human resources for health, for monitoring and ensuring accountability for the implementation of national and regional strategies, and the global strategy".  Global milestones by 2020 and 2030, policy options of Member States, responsibilities of the WHO Secretariat and recommendations to other stakeholders and international partners are discussed for each objective.

 

The inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
December 2014

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This policy paper concerns the inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development. The paper presents a number of recommendations aimed at increasing inclusion in this area and provides detailed information on background information that leads to these recommendations

Quality management of global rehabilitation services

PRYOR, Wesley
BOGGS, Dorothy
September 2013

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This seminar report outlines the proceedings and discussions of Handicap International’s seminar “Quality Management of Global Rehabilitation Services: Global Experiences, Innovations and Shaping Future Reform”. The report closely follows the structure of the seminar week, highlighting key information, contributions, discussions and recommendations from the participants.

During the seminar week, the participants from over 12 countries shared positive and challenging rehabilitation responses and analysed the quality of services, focusing upon the management and development of the workforce. Based upon their lessons learned from rehabilitation experiences, the participants then developed short-term and long-term recommendations, to be shared widely with the aim of contributing to the enhancement of global quality rehabilitation

“Quality Management of Global Rehabilitation Services: Global Experiences, Innovations and Shaping Future Reform” Seminar

Ougadougou, Burkina Faso

11–15 June 2012

Disability in the workplace : company practices

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE (ILO)
2010

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This paper is "a compilation of 25 company profiles, which describes how companies address hiring and retention, products and services and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of disability. The publication is for companies, employers’ organizations and other representative business organizations, workers’ organizations, ILO staff, people with disabilities, and others interested in learning about company practices as it relates to disability. It is one of the first knowledge sharing initiatives of the ILO Global Business and Disability Network"
Working Paper No 3

Handbook on monitoring and evaluation of human resources for health : with special applications for low- and middle-income countries

DAL POZ, Mario R
Ed
2009

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This handbook aims strengthen the technical capacity of health managers, researchers and policy makers, to monitor and evaluate their health workforce accurately . It brings together an analytical framework for strategy options for improving the health workforce information and evidence base, as well as country experiences to highlight approaches that have worked

The Kampala declaration and agenda for global action

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
GLOBAL HEALTH WORKFORCE ALLIANCE
2008

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This resource contains both the Kampala declaration and an agenda for global action to "guide the initial steps in a coordinated global, regional and national response to the worldwide shortage and mal-distribution of health workers, moving towards universal access to quality health care and improved health outcomes. It is meant to unite and intensify the political will and commitments necessary for significant and effective actions to resolve this crisis, and to align efforts of all stakeholders at all levels around solutions"

The 'Three Ones' in action : where we are and where we go from here

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
February 2005

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This report looks at progress on applying the "Three Ones" principles to the end of 2004. The principles are: one agreed AIDS action framework; one national AIDS coordinating authority; and one agreed country-level monitoring and evaluation system. The report provides an assessment of progress so far, and then considers lessons learned, identifies challenges and suggests opportunities for overcoming these challenges. While this preliminary report is not comprehensive, it is a useful step in addressing how we can make optimal use of the limited resources available for tackling the AIDS pandemic.

Model IMCI handbook : integrated management of childhood illness

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2005

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The IMCI model handbook provides a detailed explanation of the IMCI case management guidelines. It is organized into seven main parts: overview of the IMCI process; assess and classify the sick child age 2 months up to 5 years; assess and classify the sick young infant age 1 week up to 2 months; identify treatment; treat the sick child or the sick young infant; communicate and counsel; and give follow-up care
Teaching institutions are advised to adapt the handbook in two ways: 1.to ensure that all text, charts and illustrations are consistent with nationally-adapted IMCI clinical guidelines, and 2.to ensure that its content and format corresponds to the teaching approach used by the institution

Resource centre manual : how to set up and manage a resource centre

O'SULLIVAN, Sheila
et al
2003

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Contains practical information on all aspects of setting up and managing a resource centre, from planning, fundraising and finding a suitable location, to collecting and organising materials, developing information services, and monitoring and evaluating the work of the resource centre. It assumes that most readers will use manual systems for organising information, but also explains how computers can be used in resource centres, including e-mail, Internet and databases. It describes how to select database software, and contains a detailed review of three leading database programs. It includes a list of organisations and publications that can provide further information

The world health report 2001. Mental health : new understanding, new hope

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
October 2001

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This report raises awareness of the global burden of mental and neurological disorders, and its cost in human, social and economic terms. It also aims to dismantle the barriers which prevent millions of sufferers of mental and neurological disorders from receiving the treatment they need and deserve. The report describes how mental health problems can be solved (eg. by drug therapy, psycho-social rehabilitation and psychotherapy, vocational rehabilitation, housing), and gives examples of the effectiveness of these treatments for a wide range of mental disorders

Training in the community for people with disabilities

HELANDER, E
et al
1989

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This set of 33 manuals is a key training resource for CBR trainers and workers trying to improve the quality of life of disabled people living in developing countries. The manuals present the WHO model of CBR, comprised of a system of 'local supervisors' and a 'community rehabilitation committee'. The manuals address disabled people, school-teachers and families. They cover rehabilitation activities for all types of impairment, as well as training on cross-impairment issues such as breastfeeding, play, schooling, social integration and job placement

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