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Neglected diseases : a human rights analysis

HUNT, Paul
et al
2007

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This report introduces and explores some of the connections between neglected tropical diseases (those affecting people living in developing countries, particularly in rural areas) and human rights with a view to urging all parties concerned to work collaboratively in identifying the practical implications of applying human rights to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies, programmes and projects for neglected diseases

Operational guide on gender and HIV/AIDS : a rights-based approach | Resource pack on gender and HIV/AIDS

UNAIDS INTER-AGENCY TASK TEAM ON GENDER AND HIV/AIDS
2005

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This guide highlights the relationship between gender, rights and HIV and AIDS. The impact of HIV and AIDS tends to be greater in unequal settings and stigma and discrimination, often associated with the disease, intensify and reinforce inequality. This document, aimed at programme managers and development organisations, reflects on how gender inequality affects women affected by HIV and AIDS. It explains why women may be at greater risk of contracting the disease, while having poor access to treatment. Women also tend to assume the responsibility of caring for those who are sick, and girls in households affected by HIV are more likely than boys to be taken out of school as a cost-saving measure, and to help in domestic chores. The guide contains a set of checklists to help evaluate the level of commitment to gender equality in programming, funding, communication, networking and advocacy

HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations: case studies of successful programmes

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2005

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This report is a collection of case studies of projects, programmes and activities around the world that have used innovative methods to challenge HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations. The case studies are grouped under stigma-reduction approaches; anti-discrimination measures; and human rights and legal approaches. They are followed by some cross-project/activity analysis that identifies common elements and a number of key principles of success, each of which offers an entry point for innovative and potentially effective work

World health report 2004 : changing history

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2004

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This report argues that a comprehensive HIV/AIDS strategy linking prevention, treatment, care and support for people living with the virus could save the lives of millions of people in poor and middle-income countries. At present, almost six million people in developing countries need treatment, but only about 400 000 of them received it in 2003. The World Health Report 2004 argues that a treatment gap of such dimensions is indefensible and that narrowing it is both an ethical obligation and a public health necessity. In September 2003 WHO, UNAIDS and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and their partners launched an effort to provide three million people in developing countries with antiretroviral therapy (ART) by end 2005 - the 3 by 5 initiative. This World Health Report shows how a partnership linking international organizations, national governments, the private sector and communities is working simultaneously to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment, reinforce HIV prevention and strengthen health systems in some of the countries where they are currently weakest

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