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'Brain training' technique restores feeling and movement to paraplegic patients

RADFORD, Tim
August 2016

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It is reported that eight paraplegics – some of them paralysed for more than a decade by severe spinal cord injury – have been able to move their legs and feel sensation, after help from an artificial exoskeleton, sessions using virtual reality (VR) technology and a non-invasive system that links the brain with a computer. "After just 10 months of what the Brazilian medical team “brain training” they have been able to make a conscious decision to move and then get a response from muscles that have not been used for a decade". The work is part of the Walk Again Project.

Benefits and costs of e-accessibility : how economics and market forces can support e-accessibility and the convention on the rights of peoples' with disability

BURGER, Dominique
et al
March 2012

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This white paper seeks to document the innovative elements of a conference discussion about e-accessibility costs and benefits. Despite technological and political achievements, the economics of e-accessibility need to be understood. This paper aims to define new approaches to understand how best to promote e-accessibility models
E-Accessibility costs and benefits
Paris, France
28 March 2011

Inclusive education : helping teachers to choose ICT resources and to use them effectively

BENIGNO, Vincenza
BOCCONI, Stefania
OTT, Michela
November 2007

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"This paper looks at the issue of school inclusion by referring to the concept of Universal Access to Education. It focuses on the strong potential Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) provide to avoid any kind of discrimination among students. The paper also argues that teachers play a fundamental role in capitalising the opportunities offered by new technologies to support the full inclusion of all students in mainstream education systems"
e-Learning Papers, No 6

Improving health, connecting people : the role of ICTs in the health sector of developing countries|A framework paper

CHETLEY, Andrew
Ed
May 2006

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This paper gives a snapshot of the types of information and communication technology (ICT) interventions being used in the health sector, and the policy debates involving ICTs and health. It draws on the experiences of both the North and South, but focuses on applicability in the South to identify the most effective and relevant uses of ICTs. It describes the major constraints and challenges faced in using ICTs effectively in the health sector of developing countries, draws out good practices for using ICTs in the health sector, identifies major players and stakeholders, and highlights priority needs and issues of relevance to policy makers. The paper also looks at emerging trends in technologies that are likely to shape ICT use in the health sector, and identifies gaps in knowledge. It is aimed at policy makers, international donors, local practitioners, and others who are involved in the development or management of programs in the health sector in developing countries

The contributions of ICTs to pro-poor growth

BATCHELOR, Simon
SCOTT, Nigel
TAYLOR, Nigel
March 2005

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A background paper prepared for the DAC Network on Poverty Reduction. It provides a useful overview of definitions of ICT, pro-poor growth thinking and impacts on poverty

T@lemed : a telehealth case study project based on ultrasound images

DELAZARI BINOTTO, Alécio Pedro
SACHPAZIDIS, Ilias
SOARES TORRES, Márcio
et al
2005

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The growth of wired and wireless Internet (including communication via satellite) in Brazil and the recent advance of image compression methods allows rapid tele-consultation based on medical images. One of the most challenging problems in telemedicine is the real-time tele-consultation in case of emergency. In this brief paper, the ongoing T@lemed Project in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul is described and preliminary results from the first month of operation are presented

Librarians and the use of information communication technologies in the provision of HIV/AIDS information in developing countries

CHIKONZO, Agnes
2005

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This insightful and well-researched paper presents examples of good practice in managing information in and among HIV and AIDS organisations. It focuses on the work of SAfAIDS in Zimbabwe to present innovative ways of working with information. With reference to technologies from radio to the Internet, information workers such as librarians can advance networking and information exchange in the sector

Telemedicine and knowledge between medical and development discourses

MISCIONE, Gianluca
2005

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This paper explores the implication of health care development through ICT on local norms of participation, and local accountabilities. Drawing on an example from the Amazon, the author notes the interplay between a telemedicine system and local knowledge. He suggests that ICT is an 'accountable structure' for a model of development based on linear transmition of knowledge rather than dialogue and participation

Promoting the application of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. UNCTAD
April 2004

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This paper places ICT in a broad perspective of science and technology. The report seeks to identify approaches for the effective promotion and use of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration (MDGs). It particularly emphasises that academia/government/industry partnerships are essential in order to build scientific and technological capabilities and to foster market-oriented policies and developments; and that access to new and emerging technologies is imperative

Tools for development : using information and communications technology to achieve the Millennium Development Goals

UNITED NATIONS ICT TASK FORCE SECRETARIAT
December 2003

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Sponsored by the UN ICT Task Force, this paper represents an attempt to define more precisely how ICTs can be used to further the achievement of basic development objectives. Using the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as a baseline for analysis, the paper conducts a mapping exercise, which links the application of ICTs to broader development goals as expressed in the MDGs. The mapping of ICT tools to the attainment of the millennium goals in specific development areas leads to a series of ICT-specific targets and suggests possible indicators for measuring progress

Fighting rural poverty : the role of information and communication technologies|[What can information and communication technologoes (ICTs) do for the world's 900 million extremely poor people who live in rural areas?]

GILLMAN, Helen
2003

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This paper brings together some presentations, key issues and recommendations emerged during the discussion in a side event organised by IFAD at the WSIS. The paper calls for greater emphasis on communication rather than on technology, and on the process and content rather than on access and machines. Effective ICT deployment must satisfy the need for ownership, local content, language, culture and appropriateness of technology used. Crucially, communication initiatives should aim at strengthening the capacities of rural people to participate in policy processes

Assessing the need and potential of community networking for developing countries : a case study from India

BLATTMAN, Christopher
JENSEN, Robert
ROMAN, Raul
February 2002

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This paper presents a set of methods and tools that can be used to assess the community networking and information needs of specific communities and thereby influence the design of ICT projects. It describes a strategy that uses a range of both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies to undertake such an assessment, and provides a specific case study of an ICT project in rural Tamil Nadu, India. The study gathered data on the following topics: socio-economic status, agricultural marketing and price search, availability of information on agricultural problems, employment availability and search, media use, household spending, and use and satisfaction with government services. These data are used to construct an 'information and communications profile' that depicts current ICT and media usage and existing sources of information for various community agents (farmers and producers, laborers, government, etc.). The methods and costs at which agents obtain information, as well as gaps and information needs are analysed. These analyses demonstrate opportunities for community and economic development through improved information access, and identify critical issues that should be considered in the design of ICT projects

Themes and issues in telecentre sustainability

ROMAN, Raul
COLLE, Royal D
January 2002

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The initiation, diffusion and adoption of the telecentre idea has been an enormously eclectic process, largely devoid of systematic research and planning. The approach has generally been one of pilot projects trying out models to see what works to achieve a diversity of objectives. In some cases the approach has been simply entrepreneurial, with enterprising business people exploring new opportunities for profit-making. A range of important issues is linked to the operation and success of telecentres. These include: sustainability, community relevance, government policy, information and communication technology (ICT), research, community partnerships and participation, telecentre objectives, and business planning. Often mentioned but largely undeveloped is the training associated with telecentre management, an issue that relates to all of the issues mentioned. While each of the issues deserves systematic analysis, this paper concentrates on sustainability and training. Based on data collected from various project documents this paper describes some of the strategies being used to sustain telecentres

Investing in knowledge : ECDPM experiences, 1994-2000

BALLANTYNE, Peter
November 2000

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New information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way our organisations work. In response, organisations are devising new, collaborative, strategies to manage information and share knowledge. This paper illustrates how ECDPM, a small foundation, has sought to achieve its information and communication goals

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