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Improving health at home and abroad : how overseas volunteering from the NHS benefits the UK and the world|Executive summary

ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON GLOBAL HEALTH
July 2013

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This executive summary presents a summary of the main report which describes how British health volunteers help to make big improvements in health in other countries whilst at the same time benefiting the UK. It argues that even more could be achieved with better organisation and support and that more people can be involved through virtual communication as well as by actually travelling abroad

Physical and functional rehabilitation (policy paper)

RENARD, Patrice
URSEAU, Isabelle
June 2013

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This document presents the physical and functional rehabilitation-specific challenges, principles and recommendations for Handicap International. Above all, it sets out the overall framework within which the theoretical underpinnings of the Rehabilitation Services Unit are applied; the primary objective is to ensure consistency between the association’s mandate and the implementation, in its programmes, of projects falling within the unit’s scope of activities. The secondary objective is to formalise the selection and/or identification of external guidelines for adaptation for internal use. 

Sri Lanka’s first inclusive sports project through Handicap International

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL SRI LANKA
May 2013

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This video presents a compilation of many events conducted over the course of two years of Handicap International Sri Lanka's "Sport for All" project with short video clips of the different activities and some commentary from the project manager and staff members on sporting activities. It highlights the achievements of the project, level of participation of children/youth with and without disabilities, and the interest generated both at a local and national level

Factors related to Recovery and Relapse in Persons with Stuttering Following Treatment: A Preliminary Study

ARYA, P
GEETHA, Y V
2013

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Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate and compare factors related to recovery and relapse outcomes after treatment, among adults with stuttering.

 

Method: The participants were 24 adults who underwent fluency therapy and reported for follow-up 6 months after cessation of treatment. Pre, immediate post and 6-months post-treatment follow-up evaluations were done using stuttering severity instrument SSI-3. On the basis of total scores and severity obtained, participants were then grouped as either recovered or relapsed persons with stuttering. A questionnaire was administered to obtain their ratings for the different domains of factors that contributed to treatment outcomes.

 

Results: A significant difference was found between both the groups with respect to factors contributing to recovery and relapse. The four domains which were found to be more responsible for treatment outcomes in persons with stuttering were: individual related, therapy related, environment related, and behaviour and personality related factors.

 

Conclusion: The study was conducted with fewer participants, and it is possible that there could be many other pre-treatment and post-treatment factors such as attitude, anxiety, and speech naturalness which may influence the treatment outcomes in persons with stuttering. Future research should include these other factors.

Sport and play for all : a manual for including children and youth with disabilities

HARKNETT, Steve
2013

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"This training manual 'Sport and Play for All' provides tips, guidance and advice on disability and inclusion, with the primary aim of enhancing users’ knowledge and practice on inclusion. It brings together many training materials used during the Sports for All Project in Sri Lanka, including materials on disability, social inclusion and models of inclusive sport. It features many games and sports which have been field tested and adapted to enable children with disabilities to participate"

Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women : WHO clinical and policy guidelines

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2013

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"The guidelines aim to raise awareness of violence against women among health-care providers and policy-makers, so that they better understand the need for an appropriate health-sector response. They provide standards that can form the basis for national guidelines, and for integrating these issues into health-care provider education...The guidelines are based on systematic reviews of the evidence, and cover: identification and clinical care for intimate partner violence; clinical care for sexual assault; training relating to intimate partner violence and sexual assault against women; policy and programmatic approaches to delivering services; mandatory reporting of intimate partner violence"

Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women : summary

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2013

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"This document summarizes ‘Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines’, the World Health Organization (WHO), 2013 publication, developed by an international group of experts following a thorough review of evidence. It contains evidence-based recommendations for the introduction of policies into health services and programmes to improve responses within the health sector to violence against women. Each recommendation is classified as either "strong" or "conditional", on the basis of the generalizability of benefit across different communities and cultures, the needs and preferences of women to access services, as well as taking into consideration the level of human and other resources that would be required"
WHO/RHR/13.10

"Out of the shadows" : a qualitative study of parents’ and professionals’ attitudes and beliefs about children with communication disability in Uganda and how best to help them

MCGEOWN, Julia
September 2012

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"Communication forms the basis of human life and the complex ways with which humans can communicate and interact with each other sets us apart from all other species. However, not all humans are able to communicate effectively due to a range of communication impairments. The overall aim of this study is to generate solutions and recommendations to remove any barriers preventing these children from communicating effectively and potentially to improve their quality of life"
Dissertation submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for a Masters degree at the Centre for International Health and Development (CIHD) at University College London (UCL) Institute of Child Health (ICH)
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The provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices

GARTON, Francesca
URSEAU, Isabelle
July 2012

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This policy brief provides an overview of Handicap International’s 2012 policy paper on the provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices (WP&MD) for people with disabilities
PP Brief No 9
Note: this policy should be read in conjunction with Handicap International’s rehabilitation policy paper which provides a broad framework for understanding the organization’s work on rehabilitation, including WP & MD

IDDC policy briefing on HIV and AIDS and disability

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM HIV AND AIDS AND DISABILITY TASK GROUP
June 2012

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This policy brief presents information highlighting that persons with disabilities are at equal or higher risk of HIV infection than the rest of the community for the following reasons: poor access to information on sexual and reproductive health and HIV&AIDS; poor access to health care, including HIV&AIDS services; poverty and marginalisation; and high rates of sexual abuse and exploitation. Recommended actions are provided to increase the participation of persons with disabilities in the HIV response and ensure they have access to HIV services

Inclusive and integrated HIV and AIDS programming

MAC-SEING, Muriel
March 2012

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"This policy brief is an introduction to Handicap International’s 2012 Policy Paper "Inclusive and integrated HIV and AIDS programming". Handicap International promotes an inclusive approach to improving quality of life and access to services for persons with disabilities. This means that basic health care and socioeconomic services are developed according to the principle of Universal Access, where all people with impairments (whether physical, sensory, intellectual or mental), have equal access and opportunities for participation. This inclusive approach also ensures that gender considerations and disparities are acknowledged as a cross-cutting issue"
Policy brief No 7

Constraint - Induced Movement Therapy: Determinants and Correlates of Duration of Adherence to Restraint use Among Stroke Survivors with Hemiparesis

OLASUNKANMI, D O
OLASUMBO, S A
2012

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Background: Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) was developed to improve purposeful movement of the stroke-affected extremity by restricting the use of the unaffected extremity. The two main components of CIMT are the training of the more-impaired arm to perform functional tasks, and the restraint of the less-impaired arm. One challenge that the application of CIMT faces is in ensuring adherence to the use of restraint.

 

Purpose: There is a need to determine the factors that may influence adherence, as this would allow CIMT to be delivered more effectively, and prevent situations where unrealistic expectations are placed on stroke–affected individuals.

 

Methods: Thirty stroke survivors with hemiparesis who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively recruited from the physiotherapy out-patient clinics, using a purposive sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on clinical and socio-demographic parameters. The participants were given a restraint and an adherence time log-book, to make a daily record during the period they wore the restraint. The adherence time log- book was collected at the end of every week of the 3-week study. Motor function and functional use of the upper limb were measured using Motricity Index and Motor Activity Log respectively. Data was analysed using mean and standard deviations, independent t-test and Spearman rho; p was significant at 0.05.

 

Results: Gender (p=0.73) and side affected/handedness (p=0.79) had no significant influence on the percentage duration of adherence to restraint use (DARU). The influence of socio-economic status was seen, with the participants of middle socio-economic status adhering for longer duration (p=0.02). Age had weak and no significant correlation with percentage DARU (p=0.55). There was significantly fair correlation between motor function/functional use at any stage (p=0.55) and the corresponding percentage duration of adherence to restraint use, except the functional use in the first week (p=0.44).

 

Conclusion: Socio-economic status should be considered when applying CIMT.

Disability in people affected by leprosy : the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

VAN BRAKEL, W. H.
et al
2012

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"Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions." This paper assesses the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment
Global Health Action, Vol 5

Developing intervention strategies to improve community health worker motivation and performance

FRANK, Tine
KALLANDER, Karin
2012

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"This 28-page learning paper describes Malaria Consortium’s experience with Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM) in malaria prevention and treatment in Mozambique and Uganda. ICCM is an approach where community-based health workers are trained to identify, treat, and refer complex cases malaria (and other diseases) in children"
The Learning Series Papers

Armed violence and disability : the untold story

THAPA, Rashmi
THALER, Kai
2012

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"This study aims to understand the links between armed violence and impairments that can lead to disabilities. It focuses on individuals who sustain impairments resulting from incidents of armed violence. The Disability Creation Process is adapted to analyse the combination of health problems, discrimination and socio- economic exclusion that can lead to disability for people who have sustained serious injury and/or lasting impairments as a result of armed violence...This report is written in a linear progression keeping the research project’s goals, objectives and approach as its backdrop. Chapter 1 (introduction) gives an overview of armed violence along with the justification of this research and its methods. Chapter 2 presents the findings from the four case study regions in countries, situated within its contextual analysis. Each case study draws on its discussion and summary of findings. Chapter 3 presents the discussion and lessons learned from this research, placing assistance and people at the centre of armed violence initiatives. Finally, a glossary, Annexes and references as endnotes are at the end of the report with notes at the end of every page"

A qualitative and quantitative study of the surgical and rehabilitation response to the earthquake in Haiti, January 2010

REDMOND, Anthony
et al
December 2011

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"The disaster response environment in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake represented a complex healthcare challenge. This study was designed to identify challenges during the Haiti disaster response. Qualitative and quantitative study of injured patients carried out six months after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti to review the surgical inputs of foreign medical teams...This study showed that challenges for emergency medical response during the Haiti Earthquake involved issues of accountability, professional ethics, standards- of care, unmet needs, patient agency and expected outcomes for patients in such settings"
Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, Vol 26, No 6

Manual for the professional in adapted physical activity

PEYNOT, Lucile
CHANTEREAULT, Thomas
BOUZID, Ezzedine
June 2011

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The focus of this manual is to increase participation of people with disabilities in physical activities and sport. Detailed adapted physical activities are provided with practical guides, group sport guides and assessment tools in order to promote a more inclusive society and enable educators to enrich their creativity and ideas for mentoring any person interested in participating in, advancing through and gaining enjoyment from the practice of a physical activity This guide to useful to all actors such as physical education and sports teachers in all types of schools, sports club coaches, recreational centre educators and facilitators, and even workers in rehabilitation centres or medical and social services centres

Rehabilitation Services for Persons Affected by Stroke in Jordan

AL-ORAIBI, S
DAWSON, V L
BALLOCH, S
MOORE, A P
2011

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The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions stroke survivors have of the rehabilitation services received by them in the Jordanian community. A secondary aim was to explore the impact of culture on providing appropriate services for stroke survivors.

 

Eighteen stroke survivors were recruited from an outpatient stroke rehabilitation programme. All 18 participants had been discharged from hospital for between one and six months. Semi-structured interviews were performed, either in thephysiotherapy outpatient clinic where the affected person was attending a clinic or in their homes. Transcription of interviews carried out in Arabic and thematic analysis was also carried out in that language by transcribers who were fluent in Arabic and English, using a back-translation method. Necessary measures were taken to ensure the accuracy, reliability and validity of the data collection and analysis.

 

Following thematic analysis, themes arising out of the data included physiotherapy and occupational therapy support in the community, out-patient rehabilitation clinic services, community clinic services and support from families, friends and neighbours. Participants expressed satisfaction with their therapists, but there were large areas of unmet rehabilitation need for stroke survivors in the Jordanian community such as a limited availability of occupational therapy services, insufficient amount of therapy services and poor medical support.

 

This study presents a unique contribution to knowledge relating to the experiences of stroke survivors in a developing country, and also shows how care systems are very dependent on cultural contexts, cultural beliefs and practices.

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