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Every learner matters: Unpacking the learning crisis for children with disabilities

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2019

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This paper was developed by the World Bank in partnership with Leonard Cheshire and Inclusion International. It is an attempt to add knowledge to the current understanding of the importance of learning achievements, with a focus on children with disabilities. While the premise is that inclusive education refers to the inclusion of all children, the focus of this paper is on children with disabilities.

The aim of the paper is to:

  • Provide an evidence-based review of educational participation of children with disabilities.
  • Establish a case for focusing on learning achievements for students with disabilities.
  • Take stock of current mechanisms of measurement of learning outcomes and review their inclusivity.
  • Explore evidence of practice and systems which promote disability-inclusive learning for all. 

Four case studies are provided - from Pakistan, South Africa, Canada and UK.

Standard school eye health guidelines for low and middle-income countries

GILBERT, Clare
MINTO, Hasan
MORJARIA, Priya
KHAN, Imran
February 2018

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The purpose of these best practice guidelines is to provide direction to those planning and implementing eye health initiatives for schools, including policy makers, health care and educational authorities, health planners, eye care delivery organizations and professionals, in partnership with teachers, parents and children. In situations where resources for eye health are limited, decisions need to be made to ensure that programs not only address public health problems but are also implemented in a way that is effective, efficient and, wherever possible, sustainable. Systems for monitoring and plans for evaluation should also be developed at the outset. These practice guidelines provide an excellent learning resource for a module on school eye health that can be incorporated in optometry and ophthalmology residency curricula.  A section highlights some of the challenges in current school eye health initiatives and provides a framework in which school eye health is integrated into school health programs. Case studies are provided to emphasise the integrated approach and a 15-step approach, from situation analysis to monitoring and evaluation, is suggested. Practical recommendations for implementation are provided, including information on the equipment and technology required

 

This evidence-based document is based on best practice guidelines initially developed through a joint collaboration between Sightsavers International, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Brien Holden Vision Institute

Towards sustainability of the physical rehabilitation sector through sector development within broader health systems

URSEAU, Isabelle
BOGGS, Dorothy
November 2013

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This brief is a summary of Handicap International’s Sustainability of physical rehabilitation initiatives. To date these include a four year study, a participatory methodology, an international seminar and ongoing trainings, workshops and monitoring results, all of which exhibit our knowledge management cycle

PG Brief No 8

Human resources and training in mental health : mental health policy and service guidance package

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2005

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"This module aims to provide practical guidance...in order to assist countries to develop their human resources. Because of variations between countries, the module cannot provide specific norms (such as number of staff required per population unit). Instead, a set of planning and training tools is provided to assist countries to calculate their own staffing requirements and to train health workers and mental health workers according to their specific needs"
Note: This module is part of a guidance package that consists of a series of inter-related, user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in mental health policy development and service planning. The modules should be of interest to policy-makers and health planners; government departments, advocacy organizations and NGOs, families and carers of people with mental health disorders

The WHO mental health policy and service guidance package

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2003

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"The WHO mental health policy and service guidance package consists of the WHO mental health policy and plan checklists, and 14 interrelated modules...The package consists of a series of interrelated user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in policy development and service planning. The topic of each module represents a core aspect of mental health"

Mental health policy, plans and programmes : mental health policy and service guidance package

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2003

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"This module presents evidence-based guidance for the development and implementation of mental health policies, plans and programmes. The experiences of several countries are used as practical sources for drawing up mental health policies and implementing them through plans and programmes"
Notes: This module is part of a guidance package that consists of a series of interrelated user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in mental health policy development and service planning. Its recommended for use by policy makers, service planners representatives or associations of families and carers of people with mental disorders

Mental health financing : mental health policy and service guidance package

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2003

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"This module provides practical guidance to assist countries with the financing of mental health care. The aims of the module are to: (1) provide a conceptual introduction to key issues related to the financing of mental health care; (2) set out a step-by-step approach addressing these key financing issues, recognizing that the steps may need to be adapted and tailored to the circumstances of each country; (3) link the steps to activities defined in other modules. The Introduction emphasizes financing as a major driver of the system and indicates the need to integrate this function with policy-making and planning. Steps are then presented to assist countries in their financing efforts. These steps are not intended to be prescriptive or rigid. Instead they identify critical activities related to financing which should be addressed in order to build and sustain a mental health system that meets priority needs and produces desired outcomes. Barriers to mental health financing are also reviewed"
Note: This module is part of a guidance package that consists of a series of interrelated user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in mental health policy development and service planning. Its recommended for use by policy makers, service planners representatives or associations of families and carers of people with mental disorders

Hepatitis B vaccine introduction : lessons learned in advocacy, communication, and training

WITTLETT, Scott
January 2001

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Hepatitis B is especially dangerous for infants, since they may carry the infection for the rest of their lives without knowing it. Chronic carriers can infect others and are at risk of serious liver disease in later life. However, the hepatitis B vaccine, if provided, helps protect infants against these problems. The vaccine's introduction to developing countries only began in the late 1980s, but many countries still cannot afford to administer the vaccine to all children. This paper summarises the lessons learned about effective advocacy with decision makers, communication with parents and caretakers, and training health staff regarding hepatitis B, gained from over ten years of experience introducing hepatitis B vaccine worldwide. It also includes the WHO 'aide-memoire' on hepatitis B

Review of the present situation in special needs education

HEGARTY, Seamus
1995

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An overall comparison between the two situations - 1986 and 1993 - reported here and in the previous report allow for some guarded optimism. Most countries provided some information on policies but varied greatly in the amount of detail offered. Special educational provision is more firmly located within regular education, at school and the administrative levels, than before and has greater legislative underpinning. Within the policy statements, themselves, the most common strands related to : developing the individual's potential, integration and necessary steps for implementation. Regarding legislation, most countries did include special needs provision in the same regulatory framework as general education; the most common reason given for excluding particular children was severity of disability. Much remains to be done and there is no room for complacency. Many countries face fiscal and personnel constraints, and maintaining let alone increasing existing investment in special educational provision will not be easy. A word of caution : even where resources are not the central issue, the pressures created by the general school reforms taking place in many countries may reduce the priority given to speical educational provision. However, progress has been made, despite the many difficulties.

The self-advocacy toolkit for mental health services users

NTULO, Christian A

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"This toolkit is has been developed to guide advocacy efforts for groups of people with mental disorders at local and national level. Its activities are participatory by nature so as to add flavour to every group meeting. It uses the term "activity leader" to promote shared leadership, and provides a variety of activities for the groups to choose from as they plan for and execute their advocacy campaign"

Rural finance and investment learning centre

RURAL FINANCE AND INVESTMENT LEARNING CENTRE

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The Rural Finance and Investment Learning Centre (RFILC) is a web platform dedicated to the dissemination of cutting-edge knowledge for the promotion of rural and agricultural finance and investment in developing countries. It provides access to related materials for capacity development and policy design, in addition to the dissemination of news, events and multimedia

Target clients include all public and private organisations working towards greater financial inclusion and rural and agricultural development, such as financial institutions, governments, civil society organisations, development agencies and academia, among others. Materials such as training manuals, policy guides, and on-line training sessions are disseminated through the RFILC with the purpose of further developing clients’ capacity to deliver improved financial services that meet the needs of rural enterprises and households

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