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Disability inclusion and accountability framework

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2018

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The main objective of the Disability Inclusion and Accountability Framework is to support the mainstreaming of disability in World Bank activities. It lays out a road map for (a) including disability in the Bank's policies, operations and analytical work, and (b) building internal capacity for supporting clients in implementing disability-inclusive development programs. The primary target audience of the Framework is Bank staff but it is also relevant to the Bank's client countries, development partners and persons with disabilities. The framework provides four main principles for guiding the World Bank’s engagement with persons with disabilities: nondiscrimination and equality, accessibility, inclusion and participation, and partnership and collaboration. 

 

The appendices to this framework highlight key areas in which the Bank can have a significant impact on the inclusion, empowerment, and full participation of persons with disabilities. These areas include transport, urban development, disaster risk management, education, social protection, jobs and employment, information and communication technology, water sector operations, and health care. 


Report No. 126977
 

Strengthening mental health system governance in six low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South Asia: challenges, needs and potential strategies

PETERSEN, Inge
et al
February 2017

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The aim of this study was to identify key governance issues that need to be addressed to facilitate the integration of mental health services into general health care in the six participating "Emerald" countries (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda).  The study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach, using framework analysis. Purposive sampling was used to recruit a range of key informants, to ensure views were elicited on all the governance issues within the expanded framework. Key informants across the six countries included policy makers at the national level in the Department/Ministry of Health; provincial coordinators and planners in primary health care and mental health; and district-level managers of primary and mental health care services. A total of 141 key informants were interviewed across the six countries. Data were transcribed (and where necessary, translated into English) and analysed thematically using framework analysis, first at the country level, then synthesised at a cross-country level.

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Closing the gap in a generation : health equity through action on the social determinants of health|Final report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This is the final report of the World Health Organization’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (2005-2008). The report gives three main recommendations: 1 improve daily living conditions 2. Tackle the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources 3. Measure and understand the problem and assess the impact of action. The Commission was created to provide evidence on policies that improve health by addressing the social conditions in which people live and work. The report is addressed to WHO, national governments, civil society, and other global organizations

Expanding access to HIV treatment through community-based organisations

SIDACTION
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
July 2005

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This UNAIDS Best Practice Collection document aims to highlight and advocate for the work of civil society, community based organisations in particular, in responding to the AIDS epidemic in Africa. The paper describes a ground breaking survey by Sidaction, a Paris based treatment rights group, which supports community responses to AIDS in low and middle income countries. In 2004, Sidaction, in cooperation with the UNAIDS secretariat and WHO mapped treatment and care efforts by community based organisations in Africa. Many community based organisations are already dispensing ARVs on a significant scale. The survey confirmed that community efforts to provide treatment represent an important opportunity to enrol more people in antiretroviral therapy. To seize this opportunity, national governments and the international community need to quickly provide support to expand the coverage and impact of community based treatment. The aim is for CBOs to work closely with the public sector so that each reinforces the efforts of the other

HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations: case studies of successful programmes

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2005

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This report is a collection of case studies of projects, programmes and activities around the world that have used innovative methods to challenge HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations. The case studies are grouped under stigma-reduction approaches; anti-discrimination measures; and human rights and legal approaches. They are followed by some cross-project/activity analysis that identifies common elements and a number of key principles of success, each of which offers an entry point for innovative and potentially effective work

Analysis of aid in support of HIV/AIDS control, 2000-2002

DAC
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
June 2004

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This report is a review of statistical data on aid to HIV/AIDS control. It was compiled by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Secretariat in collaboration with the members of the DAC Working Party on Statistics (WP-STAT) and UNAIDS between February and May 2004. The key findings are presented concerning total official development assistance commitments for HIV/AIDS control, and bilateral aid. It also includes contributions to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The report notes that larger donors especially multilaterals are the main funders of treatment programmes, which require substantial funding and long term commitments. Smaller donors tend to concentrate on HIV prevention, but also support home-based care and social mitigation activities

Interim policy on collaborative TB/HIV issues

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Stop TB Department and Department of HIV/AIDS
2004

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This policy responds to a demand from countries for immediate guidance on which collaborative TB/HIV activities to implement and under what circumstances. It is complementary to and in synergy with the established core activities of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes. Implementing the DOTS strategy is the core activity for tuberculosis control. Similarly, infection and disease prevention and health promotion activities and the provision of treatment and care form the basis for HIV/AIDS control. This policy does not call for the institution of a new specialist or independent disease control programme. It rather promotes enhanced collaboration between tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS programmes in the provision of a continuum of quality care at service-delivery level for people with, or at risk of tuberculosis and people living with HIV/AIDS

South African health review 2001

HEALTH SYSTEMS TRUST (HST)
March 2002

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This is a comprehensive, authoritative and independent review of the South African health system. It is published annually and this year's edition is is made up of 17 chapters grouped into four themes: listening to voices, equity, information for health, accountability and transformation. The review acts as a barometer for assessing the transformation processes and their impact on provision of equitable health care to all in South Africa

Reaching the most vulnerable : proposed supplement to the standard rules on the equalization of opportunities for persons with disabilities | Report of the Special Rapporteur of the Commission for Social Development on monitoring the implementation of th

LINDQVIST, Bengt
2002

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The Standard Rules is one of the most important tools for the inclusion of disabled people. In 2002 the United Nations special rapporteur presented a supplement for the standard rules which aims to fill the gaps within the standard rules and complement its text mentioning poverty alleviation, adequate housing and living conditions, special attention for disabled people in emergency situations, gender aspects and others. At the 42nd session of the Commission for Social Development in February 2004 it was suggested that this supplement for the standard rules be adopted.

Influence of cultural factors on disability and rehabilitation in developing countries [Editorial]

ASIA PACIFIC DISABILITY REHABILITATION JOURNAL
1999

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Western stereotypes of 'community' are used in the planning of many CBR programmes in developing countries. These programmes expose themselves to a higher risk of failure because they tend to conflict with the cultural factors of the host country. This editorial illustrates the significance of cultural influences on disability and rehabilitation in the context of CBR

Community-based rehabilitation and the health care referral services : a guide for programme managers

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
1994

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This guide describes community-based rehabilitation (CBR) activities as managed by the health care sector. In countries where another sector has responsibility for CBR, the Ministry of Health manages only the rehabilitation services that are part of the health sector, though it may also participates in inter-sectoral CBR activities. The information in this guide is intended for use by rehabilitation management personnel in both of these situations. It is a must for planners of CBR projects. 'Mid-level rehabilitation workers' and their training are also mentioned

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