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IASC Guidelines, Inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action

INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE (IASC)
November 2019

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The guidelines set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities who are most at risk of being left behind in humanitarian settings.

The recommended actions in each chapter place persons with disabilities at the centre of humanitarian action, both as actors and as members of affected populations. They are specific to persons with disabilities and to the context of humanitarian action and build on existing and more general standards and guidelines.

These are the first humanitarian guidelines to be developed with and by persons with disabilities and their representative organizations in association with traditional humanitarian stakeholders. Based on the outcomes of a comprehensive global and regional multi-stakeholder consultation process, they are designed to promote the implementation of quality humanitarian programmes in all contexts and across all regions, and to establish and increase both the inclusion of persons with disabilities and their meaningful participation in all decisions that concern them.

Ensuring universal access to eye health in urban slums in the Global South: the case of Bhopal (India).

PREGEL, Andrea
et al
October 2017

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In the context of its Urban Eye Health Programme in Bhopal (India), Sightsavers launched a pilot approach aimed at developing an Inclusive Eye Health (IEH) model and IEH Minimum Standards.

Accessibility audits were conducted in a tertiary eye hospital and four primary vision centres located within urban slums, addressing the accessibility of physical infrastructures, communication and service provision. The collection and analysis of disaggregated data inform the inclusion strategy and provide a baseline to measure the impact of service provision. Trainings of eye health staff and sensitisation of decision makers on accessibility, universal design, disability and gender inclusion are organised on a regular basis.

A referral network is being built to ensure participation of women, people with disabilities and other marginalised groups, explore barriers at demand level, and guarantee wider access to eye care in the community. Finally, advocacy interventions will be developed to raise awareness in the community and mainstream disability and gender inclusion within the public health sector.

Report on piloting of appropriate sanitation options for differently abled people (DAP)

DUSHTHA SHASTHYA KENDRA (DSK)
July 2008

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This report describes the implementation of a pilot project in urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh, that introduced appropriate and user-friendly sanitation options for differently abled people (DAP) including pregnant women, disabled and older people. The report outlines the project which focused upon adapting existing communal facilities to include DAP. It would be useful for people interested in inclusive water, sanitation and hygiene in Bangladesh.
The project was implemented by WaterAid Bangladesh's partner Dushtha Shasthya Kendra (DSK) in collaboration with Action on Disability and Development (ADD)

Working where the risks are : drug abuse prevention programme in Asia for marginalised youth

2002

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The programme uses non-formal education to reach vulnerable young people who are at risk of drug misuse and HIV, mainly in India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, but also in Pakistan, Malaysia and Nepal. These youth often live in marginalised settings, e.g. slum dwellers, street children, or certain low caste communities. The programme also raises awareness among the broader community about drug mis-use and harm prevention activities, and develop policy with organisations and professionals, from grassroots level to regional government

Equal opportunities for all : promoting community-based rehabilitation (CBR) among urban poor populations. Initiating and sustaining CBR in urban slums and low-income groups

ASSOCIATION AMICI DI RAOUL FOLLEREAU (AIFO)
October 2001

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Most CBR experience has come from rural areas in developing countries. However, even in large cities specific population groups - such as people living in slums or low-income areas in the urban peripheries - may face difficulties in accessing rehabilitation services. To address this, the World Health Organization set up a number of pilot consultations and projects in seven countries (Indonesia, India, the Philippines, Brazil, Bolivia, Egypt and Kenya) in 1995. This document gives a report of a final meeting of representatives of these pilot projects.

Dependence to independence : young people, drugs and marginalisation in Asia

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
2001

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This position paper has two broad purposes. First, it seeks to make explicit key aspects of the strategic thinking which has informed the design and development of the UNESCO Drug Abuse Prevention Programme for Marginalized Youth in Asia (DAPPA), as well as articulating some specific issues with which the programme engages within the context of over-arching UNESCO mandates on education and poverty eradication. Second, drawing upon experience among programme partners, the paper describes some of the key components of the project and highlights their mutually complementary nature

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