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Leaving no-one behind: using assistive technology to enhance community living for people with intellectual disability

OWUOR, John
LARKIN, Fiona
MacLACHLAN, Malcolm
April 2017

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The transformation of community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) through enhanced access to assistive technology (AT) is discussed. The problems associated with lack of access to AT and the extent to which these occur are reported. Issues in lack of AT provision, including lack of global standards, are discussed. A call to action is made with reference to the appropriate parts of CRPD.   

 

 

Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 12:5, 426-428

DOI: 10.1080/17483107.2017.1312572 

Do unlikely partners contribute to an informed society? [whole issue]

MCBEAN, Bridget
December 2004

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This brief resource highlights the link between development and innovation, and knowledge and information accessibility. The process of creating an informed society depends not only on the availability of information technology and infrastructures, but also and primarily on people, as the creators and users of knowledge. The paper calls for improvements in the e-readiness of developing countries, higher literacy levels and better protection of the right to information

Electronic immunisation registry and tracking system in Bangladesh

AHMED, M
2004

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This report summarises the 2001 development of a new computerised information system to register, schedule and track the immunisation of children, which was introduced by the Department of Public Health in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh. While no direct funding was provided for it, the assumed cost was not more than US $5000. The author concludes that system has been working well for the past three years. He also notes that the utilisation of ICTs in poor countries should be targeted at those intermediaries (such as health workers) who play a key role in the lives of the poor through high-contact service delivery. Empowering those workers and helping improve the effectiveness of their service delivery will do more for the poor than any number of e-government portals

The application of GIS technology to equitably distribute fieldworker workload in a large, rural South African health survey

TANSER, F C
2002

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An accessibility model within a geographical information system (GIS) is used to predict average inter-homestead walking times and subdivide the study area into units of equal completion time. The method could be used to ergonomically design home-based care and tuberculosis directly observed treatment programmes and inform the siting of health facilities. The paper highlights the use of GIS technology as a powerful tool in developing countries

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