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Strengthening mental health system governance in six low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South Asia: challenges, needs and potential strategies

PETERSEN, Inge
et al
February 2017

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The aim of this study was to identify key governance issues that need to be addressed to facilitate the integration of mental health services into general health care in the six participating "Emerald" countries (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda).  The study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach, using framework analysis. Purposive sampling was used to recruit a range of key informants, to ensure views were elicited on all the governance issues within the expanded framework. Key informants across the six countries included policy makers at the national level in the Department/Ministry of Health; provincial coordinators and planners in primary health care and mental health; and district-level managers of primary and mental health care services. A total of 141 key informants were interviewed across the six countries. Data were transcribed (and where necessary, translated into English) and analysed thematically using framework analysis, first at the country level, then synthesised at a cross-country level.

Mad studies: Intersections with disability studies, social work, and mental health

INTERSECTIONALITIES, A GLOBAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK, ANALYSIS,RESEARCH, POLITY AND PRACTICE
December 2016

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A special issue of the online journal "Intersectionalities - A Global Journal of Social Work Analysis, Research, Polity, and Practice", Vol 5, No.3 (2016) providing 10 articles on the theme of Mad studies. Titles of papers included are: 

Doing Mad Studies: Making (Non)sense Together; 

An Introduction to Anti-Black Sanism; 

Why Mad Studies Needs Survivor Research and Survivor Research Needs Mad Studies; 

Recovery-as-Policy as a Form of Neoliberal State Making; 

“About Nothing Without Us”: A Comparative Analysis of Autonomous Organizing Among People Who Use Drugs and Psychiatrized Groups in Canada; 

Too Young to Be Mad: Disabling Encounters with 'Normal' from the Perspectives of Psychiatrized Youth; 

Relocating Mad_Trans Re_presentations Within an Intersectional Framework; 

A Desire to be ‘Normal’? A Discursive and Intersectional Analysis of ‘Penetration Disorder’; 

Racialized Communities, Producing Madness and Dangerousness; 

Psy-Times: The Psycho-Politics of Resilience in University Student Life

Improving Ghana’s mental healthcare through task-shifting-psychiatrists and health policy directors perceptions about government’s commitment and the role of community mental health workers

AGYAPONG, Vincent
et al
October 2016

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The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of psychiatrists and health policy directors about the policy to expand mental health care delivery in Ghana through a system of task-shifting from psychiatrists to community mental health workers (CMHWs). A self-administered semi-structured questionnaire was developed and administered to 11 psychiatrists and 29 health policy directors. Key informant interviews were also held with five psychiatrists and four health policy directors. .

Globalization and Health (2016) 12:57

DOI 10.1186/s12992-016-0199-z

Gender and disability : a way forward to overcoming multiple discrimination

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents key information about the inclusion of disability in gender policies and programs. It highlights key facts and issues such as women and girls with disabilities facing multiple discrimination, gaps in political and program responses and legal policy and frameworks. It outlines practical steps can be taken by development actors at different levels and suggests ways to measure progress

 

Advocacy briefing paper

The ScoPeO tool : measuring the impact of our interventions : quality of life, safety and social and family protection

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents information about Handicap International’s ScoPeO tool which is a data collection tool to help measure outcomes of development initiatives on the quality of life (QOL) of beneficiaries who have accessed our projects and those of our partners. This brief highlights the need to measure quality of life and provides an overview of how ScoPeO works along with a case study from Rwanda. It outlines how humanitarian and development actors can measure impact and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

Nonparametric estimation of a compensating variation : the cost of disability

HANCOCK, Ruth
MORCIANO, Marcello
PUDNEY, Stephen
December 2013

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This paper proposes a nonparametric matching approach to estimation of implicit costs based on the compensating variation (CV) principle. The paper aims to introduce the matching approach, compare its properties with those of the conventional indirect parametric approach, and demonstrate its application in an important policy area. The authors apply the method to estimate the additional personal costs experienced by disabled older people in Great Britain, finding that those costs are substantial, averaging in the range £48-61 a week, compared with the mean level of state disability benefit (£28) or total public support (£47) received. Estimated costs rise strongly with the severity of disability. The authors compare the nonparametric approach with the standard parametric method, finding that the latter tends to generate large overestimates unless conditions are ideal, and recommend the nonparametric approach

ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2013-26

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease policy brief

OLCHINI, Davide
PASQUIER, Estelle
GUIMET, Pauline
September 2012

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"This policy brief is an introduction to Handicap International’s 2012 policy paper on diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. It provides an overview of Handicap International's activities in this sector"
Policy brief 6

Inclusive education

CORPS, Hannah
September 2012

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This policy brief provides an overview of Handicap International’s 2012 policy paper on inclusive education which explains Handicap International’s current work on inclusive education and offers perspectives for the period 2011-2015
PP Brief No 8

Diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors

GUIMET, Pauline
PASQUIER, Estelle
OLCHINI, Davide
July 2012

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"This document is an operational guideline produced specifically for Handicap International’s programmes. It is intended to provide them with guidance and a framework for each stage of the project cycle (project development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation) for projects tackling the theme of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF)"
Policy paper 6

Inclusive education (background paper)

CORPS, Hannah
CERALLI, Gilles
BOISSEAU, Sandra
July 2012

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"This policy paper explains Handicap International’s current work on inclusive education and offers perspectives for the period 2011-2015. The primary aim is to provide readers with a deeper understanding of the topic and sufficient knowledge to undertake concrete, positive actions towards inclusion. This policy paper draws upon Handicap International’s experience in the field of education since 1998 and prior to that, its experience of working with former development partner Action Nord Sud (ANS) 2. It takes into account the outcomes of baseline field assessments, meetings with partners and donors, feedback from educational professionals, decision-makers and policymakers, and importantly, the views of children with disabilities and their families"
PP No 8

Identifying and supporting vulnerable people in community-led total sanitation : a Bangladesh case study

FAWZI, A
JONES, H
2011

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Community – led sanitation often neglects the poorest and most disadvantaged people in society as they are often unable to participate. This paper looked at the experiences of three CLTS communities in Bangladesh. It found that a well being ranking, amongst other things, should be used to help identify vulnerable members in the community and that vulnerable people themselves strongly believe in the power of CLTS to improve their livelihoods and their importance in the participation of CLTS activities. Furthermore, vulnerable people are motivated to move up the sanitation ladder and most households have made improvements to their latrine. Finally, the installation of toilet seats on latrines to aid disabled people has in some cases decreased the sanitation independence of other household members 

Let’s make disability visible in the fight against HIV

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL KENYA
November 2009

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This issue's aim is to capture local voices from grassroots disability organisations that implement HIV and AIDS activities, with a focus on rural and remote areas. It would be of of interest to those interested in disability and HIV and AIDS projects and campaigns in Kenya

Packages of care for epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries

MBUBA, Caroline K
NEWTON, Charles R
October 2009

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This article focuses on the management of epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries and recommends a package of care - a combination of interventions aimed at improving the recognition and management of conditions to achieve optimal outcomes - for epilepsy, that is sustainable

Getting research into policy and practice

INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (IDS)
October 2009

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This issue focuses on the innovative approaches to communicating research experiences being used by researchers and communication experts around sexual and reproductive health and HIV and AIDS globally. It includes specific articles about Ghana, Tanzania, South Africa and Bangladesh

Promoting sexual and reproductive health for persons with disabilities : WHO/UNFPA guidance note

GROCE, Nora
et al
2009

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This resource addresses issues of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) programming for persons with disabilities. SRH, in particular, deserves attention because these needs have been so widely and so deeply neglected. At the same time, however, the approaches discussed here apply broadly to all aspects of health programming for persons with disabilities. This note outlines a general approach to programming and does not address specific protocols for the SRH care and treatment of persons with disabilities It is intended for SRH experts and advocates within UNFPA and WHO as well as those in other development organisations and partners

Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities : its implementation and relevance for the World Bank

GUERNSEY, Katherine
NICOLI, Marco
NINIO, Alberto
June 2007

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This paper is a World Bank organisational learning tool designed to provide a review and commentary on the relevance of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The purpose is to assist World Bank staff with supporting implementation activities. The articles that make up this document aim to operationalize World Bank protocols, legal obligations and benchmark specific principles. This practical resource would be useful for those working in the field of disability and development, in particular those working towards legislative reform

Disability in emergency : accessing general assistance and addressing specific needs

SCHERRER, Valérie
May 2007

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This article provides general information about why people with disabilities are vulnerable and highlights Handicap International’s emergency responses including details about Disability Focal Points (DFP). It concludes by making inclusive recommendations to other emergency actors. This article is useful for people interested in disability in emergency situations
VOICE out loud, Issue 5

The care economy : gender and the silent AIDS crisis in Southern Africa

URDANG, Stephanie
March 2006

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This article considers the impact of AIDS on women’s roles and responsibilities within the household ‘care economy’. In particular, it emphasises that all interventions aimed at reversing the AIDS epidemic need to take into account the excessive work-load that members of the household, usually women, shoulder in responding to the needs of sick family members. Most notably, gender equality and care economy issues need to be identified by development programmes. There is also a need to implement policies that focus on issues such as treatment, prevention, education, economic empowerment and violence against women. The article argues that unless the care economy and the relations of gender inequality within the household are included in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of such interventions, results will be compromised

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