Resources search

Local economic and inclusive development; a toolkit for replication

Humanity & Inclusion
CAMID
The Employers' Federation of Ceylon
2019

Expand view

This replication guidebook is a tool that aims to highlight the link between social exclusion and poverty and is based on the premise that a country cannot achieve its development targets, if a section of its people is left behind.

 

This guidebook aims to show practitioners practical ways of working on economic development that inclusive of socially excluded groups such as women, people with disabilities, people living in poverty, etc. It provides corresponding concepts, explains the steps and suggests tools that may help practitioners use and adapt to their context. The context of this book are based on field level experience of the project team of the Inclusive Economic Development project.

Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

Expand view

This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

Expand view

This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Evaluating the impact of a community–based parent training programme for children with cerebral palsy in Ghana

ZUURMOND, Maria
et al
January 2017

Expand view

"Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children worldwide, and yet in most low resource settings there are few services available to support children with cerebral palsy or their families. Research is required to understand the effectiveness of community and/or home based programmes to address this gap. This 2-year study aimed to evaluate a participatory caregiver training programme called ‘Getting to know cerebral palsy’ in Ghana. The training programme consisted of a monthly half-day support group with training, and a home visit, delivered across eight sites in Ghana over 10 months. A total of 76 families and children were included at baseline and 64 families followed up one year later at endline. Children were aged between 18months and 12 years with a mean of 3.8 years and a range of severity of cerebral palsy. Nearly all (97%) the caregivers were female and the father was absent in 51% of families. The study was a pre-post intervention design using mixed methods to evaluate the impact. A baseline and endline quantitative survey was conducted to assess caregiver quality of life (QoL) and knowledge about cerebral palsy and child feeding, health, and nutrition outcomes. Qualitative data was collected to explore the impact and experiences of the training programme in more depth".

Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal

ACHARYA, Bibhav
MARU, Duncan
SCHWARZ, Ryan
et al
January 2017

Expand view

"Mental illnesses are the largest contributors to the global burden of non-communicable diseases. However, there is extremely limited access to high quality, culturally-sensitive, and contextually-appropriate mental healthcare services. This situation persists despite the availability of interventions with proven efficacy to improve patient outcomes. A partnerships network is necessary for successful program adaptation and implementation."

Inclusive project cycle management training

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
December 2012

Expand view

"Inclusive Project Cycle Management (IPCM) training package has been developed for CBM staff and Partner Organisations worldwide

 

The Trainers’ Manual will guide CBM trainers. It contains the curriculum for the course and training resources for trainers to help them deliver the course. The training will be successful if the trainers make sufficient planning time to prepare in advance and to respond to partners training needs. Different contexts and different partners may require different emphasis on areas that may be a challenge. This training material is not suggested as a prescriptive manual but as a suggested framework that can be added to and deepened as required. This means adapting the course to the local context and training needs and competencies of partners. In particular, it would be good to supplement or replace case studies included in the course with local case studies (refer Handout 8) and to have participants draw on their own examples

 

In addition to the Trainers’ Manual, there are also Participant Folders. There is a small amount of information to be included in the folders at the beginning. Participants will receive extra course materials during the three days to complete their folders (Handouts)


The objective of the training is to promote inclusion in CBM’s work and the work of CBM’s partners. It focuses on two particular aspects of inclusion – how to ensure people with disabilities and both women and men participate in and benefit from development activities"

The epidemic divide

HEALTH AND CARE DEPARTMENT, INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (ICRC)
July 2009

Expand view

The burden of epidemics of infectious diseases on the social and economic development of poorer countries is growing, but is not being sufficiently addressed. This paper argues that to reduce the impact of epidemics involves addressing complex issues that include prevention of disease, empowering communities, better access to health services at the community level, availability of health personnel and better infrastructure (especially for water and sanitation)

State of the world's mothers 2008 : closing the survival gap for children under 5

SAVE THE CHILDREN USA
May 2008

Expand view

This report shows which countries are succeeding - and which are failing - to deliver basic health care to the mothers and children who need it most. It examines where the health care gaps between the poorest and best-off children are widest, and where they are smallest. It also looks at the survival gaps between the rich and poor children in developing countries, and shows how millions of children’s lives could be saved by ensuring all children get essential, low-cost health care

Closing the gap in a generation : health equity through action on the social determinants of health|Final report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

Expand view

This is the final report of the World Health Organization’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (2005-2008). The report gives three main recommendations: 1 improve daily living conditions 2. Tackle the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources 3. Measure and understand the problem and assess the impact of action. The Commission was created to provide evidence on policies that improve health by addressing the social conditions in which people live and work. The report is addressed to WHO, national governments, civil society, and other global organizations

Genocide by denial : how profiteering from HIV/AIDS killed millions

MUGYENYI, Peter
2008

Expand view

This open access book charts the spread of AIDS and its impact on people in villages in Uganda, sub-Saharan Africa and the rest of the world and the unnecessary numbers of deaths, particularly among poor people that it has caused. It also looks at the campaign to gain universal access to anti-retroviral therapy and the limited level of response from the rich world. The author challenges pharmaceutical companies to develop more ethical and humanitarian ways to trade, involving crucial life-saving drugs, and calls for a new world order to ensure entitlement of the poor to rapid humanitarian relief

Training for success : a guide for peer trainers

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION (ILO)
2008

Expand view

This guide was developed to help train peer trainers to teach others about how to run a business. It is based on ILO proects and was field-tested in a 2007 project in Cambodia. Key aspects of the peer training method are highlighted with useful steps, illustrations and case studies. This manual is useful for people interested in training peer trainers

Social analysis and disability : a guidance note : incorporating disability-inclusive development into Bank-supported projects

World Bank
Ed
March 2007

Expand view

The Social Development department of the World Bank has produced this easy-to-use report as a part of a series of guidance notes on social analysis. It offers practical advice on mainstreaming disability-inclusive development into World Bank projects. The report provides a checklist for developing inclusive disability policies and for including people with disabilities in each aspect of the development project cycle. The report does not aim to promote separate disability projects but rather to ensure that people with disabilities are included in all projects. The report would be useful for anyone with an interest in mainstreaming disability in international development policy and practice

Making inclusion operational : legal and institutional resources for World Bank staff on the inclusion of disability issues in investment projects

GUERNSEY, Katherine
NICOLI, Marco
NINIO, Alberto
September 2006

Expand view

This paper aims to support World Bank staff to mainstream disability issues in their work. The intention is to promote the inclusion of disabled people in all aspects of a project cycle, from design, to implementation, monitoring and evaluation. In particular, the paper provides a practical checklist to address specific actions that promote inclusive development. The paper would be a useful tool for any practitioners working in the field of development

HIV prevention with especially vulnerable young people : case studies of success and innovation

WOOD, Kate
et al
May 2006

Expand view

This follow-up publication is intended to be read in conjunction with 'HIV/AIDS prevention and care for especially vulnerable young people: a framework for action', which set out five core principles underpinning effective HIV/AIDS prevention programming with young people: putting the young person first; promoting meaningful participation; a commitment to rights; promoting gender equity; and tackling risk and vulnerability. It outlines five case studies. Each case study describes how these principles have been put into action, through innovative approaches to working with young people who are homeless, using drugs, selling sex or living in deprived communities. Case studies come from Argentina, India, Iran, Kenya and Nigeria. This is a useful resource for policy-makers, practitioners and researchers working to promote young people's sexual health in resource-constrained settings

Neglected tropical diseases : hidden successes, emerging opportunities

World Health Organization [WHO]
2006

Expand view

This report looks at neglected tropical diseases. These diseases particularly affect poor and disadvantaged people with limited access to health services and have a low profile and status in public health priorities. Despite the challenges involved, some progress has been made through interventions around particular diseases in certain countries. This report highlights some of those successes

Who do the CBD reach? A study for the Tanzanian German Programme to Support Health (TGPSH)

KIBUGA, Kate Forrester
July 2005

Expand view

The GTZ-supported CBD (Community Based Distribution) agents are volunteers at village level in Tanga region of Tanzania, who provide information on sexual and reproductive health topics, and distribute contraceptives in their neighbourhoods, thus increasing access to family planning services and reproductive health information. This study examined whether CBD reached poorer people and whether poverty influences the choice made in sourcing contraceptives. A participatory methodology was used - CBD agents drew maps of their neighbourhood, marking every house, determining the wealth status of each household, and indicating each house using their services. Poorer people are effectively reached by CBD, but the average wealth group makes greater use of it. However, poorer people are more likely to use CBD than to go to the health facilities. CBD agents found the maps a useful tool for monitoring their work, but there were doubts as to their accuracy for this study. CBD agents may have inflated the number of clients, or omitted houses with no clients

UN Millennium Project 2005 : who's got the power? Transforming health systems for women and children. Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health

FREEDMAN, Lynn P
et al
2005

Expand view

This report has been produced by the Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health. It identifies technical interventions needed to address the problems of high rates of maternal mortality, continued child deaths due to preventable illnesses, unmet need for sexual and reproductive health services, and weak and fragile health systems. The report also asserts that policymakers must act now to change the fundamental societal dynamics that currently prevent those most in need from accessing quality health care

Investing in development : a practical plan to achieve the Millennium Development Goals

UN MILLENNIUM PROJECT
2005

Expand view

This document presents the findings and recommendations of the UN Millennium Project, focusing on the work carried out by 10 thematic task forces comprising more than 250 experts from around the world, including scientists, development practitioners, parliamentarians, policymakers, and representatives from civil society, UN agencies, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the private sector. It discusses the world's progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in public, private and civil society sectors. The concluding section discusses 'ways forward'

Tackle malaria today : give tomorrow a chance

MEEK, Sylvia
WHITTY, Christopher
LINES, Jo
et al
2005

Expand view

Every year malaria causes up to three million deaths, and if attempts to control the pandemic fail, drug-resistant malaria will spread even further. This report provides key statistics about the disease and makes a case for an effective and internationally coordinated response to the crisis, which should include drugs development, use of insecticide, increased funding, investment in the delivery systems and human resources and the involvement of the private sector

Childcare and early childhood development programmes and policies : their relationship to eradicating child poverty

PENN, Helen
June 2004

Expand view

The paper explores paradigms, arguments and evidence on which international agencies draw in discussing early childhood development (ECD). These include assumptions about poverty and the role of ECD in reducing poverty, assumptions about ‘the robustness’ of ECD and the contexts in which ECD takes place. Two case studies, one from Swaziland and one from Kazakhstan are used to explore strengths and limitations. The paper concludes that almost all the evidence for the effectiveness of ECD in determining cognitive, social and economic outcomes is drawn either directly from the North, particularly from the USA, or relies on assumptions drawn from work carried out in the North as a basis for recommendations in the South. The paper points out that ECD may be a useful form of practical relief to mitigate childhood poverty in particular circumstances and this could include children affected by HIV/AIDS. There is a section on page 35 on early childhood development and HIV/AIDs. Other vulnerable children are noted as those with time poor mothers and those in situations of war and conflict

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates