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Disability inclusion and accountability framework

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2018

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The main objective of the Disability Inclusion and Accountability Framework is to support the mainstreaming of disability in World Bank activities. It lays out a road map for (a) including disability in the Bank's policies, operations and analytical work, and (b) building internal capacity for supporting clients in implementing disability-inclusive development programs. The primary target audience of the Framework is Bank staff but it is also relevant to the Bank's client countries, development partners and persons with disabilities. The framework provides four main principles for guiding the World Bank’s engagement with persons with disabilities: nondiscrimination and equality, accessibility, inclusion and participation, and partnership and collaboration. 

 

The appendices to this framework highlight key areas in which the Bank can have a significant impact on the inclusion, empowerment, and full participation of persons with disabilities. These areas include transport, urban development, disaster risk management, education, social protection, jobs and employment, information and communication technology, water sector operations, and health care. 


Report No. 126977
 

Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Leaving no-one behind: using assistive technology to enhance community living for people with intellectual disability

OWUOR, John
LARKIN, Fiona
MacLACHLAN, Malcolm
April 2017

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The transformation of community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) through enhanced access to assistive technology (AT) is discussed. The problems associated with lack of access to AT and the extent to which these occur are reported. Issues in lack of AT provision, including lack of global standards, are discussed. A call to action is made with reference to the appropriate parts of CRPD.   

 

 

Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 12:5, 426-428

DOI: 10.1080/17483107.2017.1312572 

Mental health and trauma in asylum seekers landing in Sicily in 2015: a descriptive study of neglected invisible wounds

CREPET, Anna
RITA, Francesco
REID, Anthony
et al
January 2017

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While the medical conditions of newly migrated asylum seekers to Sicily were being addressed, the mental health of those who may have experienced trauma before, during, or after their migration was not addressed. "Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), in agreement with the Italian Ministry of Health, provided mental health (MH) assessment and care for recently-landed asylum seekers in Sicily. This study documents mental health conditions, potentially traumatic events and post-migratory living difficulties experienced by asylum seekers in the MSF programme in 2014–15." 

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities (theme: access to rights-based support for persons with disabilities)

DEVANDAS, Catalina
December 2016

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In her report, the Special Rapporteur provides an overview of the activities undertaken in 2016, as well as a thematic study on access to support by persons with disabilities. The study includes guidance for States on how to ensure the provision of different forms of rights-based support and assistance for persons with disabilities, in consultation with them. In preparing the study, the Special Rapporteur convened a regional expert consultation in Addis Ababa in September 2016 and analysed the responses to a questionnaire sent to Member States, national human rights institutions, agencies of the United Nations system, civil society organisations and persons with disabilities and their representative organisations. As at 5 December 2016, she had received 114 responses. 

The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery

ORLOWSKI, Simone
LAWN, Sharon
MATTHEWS, Ben
et al
October 2016

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Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16–24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. Results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region are described. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. 

 

DOI: 10.1186/s12913-016-1790-y

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Contingency planning guide

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES
2012

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This document provides an overview of the key elements of contingency planning. This guide is aimed at assisting National Society and IFRC staff responsible for developing contingency plans at the local, national, regional or global levels. It is essential to develop contingency plans in consultation and cooperation with those who will have to implement or approve them. This document provides guidelines, not strict rules; planning priorities will differ according to the context and scope of any given situation. This guide breaks contingency planning down into five main steps: prepare, analyse, develop, implement and review. Each step is covered by a separate chapter in this document

The epidemic divide

HEALTH AND CARE DEPARTMENT, INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (ICRC)
July 2009

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The burden of epidemics of infectious diseases on the social and economic development of poorer countries is growing, but is not being sufficiently addressed. This paper argues that to reduce the impact of epidemics involves addressing complex issues that include prevention of disease, empowering communities, better access to health services at the community level, availability of health personnel and better infrastructure (especially for water and sanitation)

Contingency plan for natural disasters (including those arising from severe weather conditions)

EMERGENCY SUPPORT UNIT, SECURITY BUREAU, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government
September 2007

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This contingency plan summarises the Government’s alerting systems and organisational framework for responding to such disasters in Hong Kong. Functions and responsibilities of Government departments and other bodies in the event of natural disasters including those resulting from severe weather conditions are also set out in this Contingency Plan

File Ref. SEC 8/2/12 Part 30

Infrastructure for all : meeting the needs of both men and women in development projects|A practical guide for engineers, technicians and project managers

REED, Brian
COATES, Sue
PARRY-JONES, Sarah
et al
2007

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This book provides information to help engineers, technicians and project managers ensure that the facilities they design and build are beneficial to all members of society. Using examples, especially related to water and sanitation, the book highlights the need for social analysis and gender analysis to improve the design, implementation and use of infrastructure. It would be useful for engineers, technicians and project managers interested in infrastructure development in low- and middle-income countries

Lessons learned from the nine communities funded through the Connecting Communities for Better Health program

FOUNDATION FOR EHEALTH INITIATIVE
2006

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This document brings together the experiences and lessons learned in the implementation of health information exchange (HIE) initiatives as part of Connecting Communities for Better Health programme. The programme provides support to health information organisations and initiatives across the United States, but lessons can be applied to other contexts and settings. Covers all main components of programme planning and implementation, including: creating business models; planning and building IT infrastructure; getting started; assessing the environment; developing a shared vision; marketing; resource allocation and budget; data collection and evaluation; replication of prior success as a project strategy

The other side of the river : cyberspace comes to the Amazon

RÊGO, Fausto
June 2005

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This report describes the 'Saúde e Alegria' (Health and Happiness) project (http://www.saudeealegria.org.br/ ) developed by RITS (Red de Información para el Tercer Sector), a member of APC in Brazil, with the support of the Avina Foundation and the Institute for Connectivity in the Americas. It shows the impact of the project on the community, including a case where the internet provided access to snake bite information after a local girl was bitten

Do unlikely partners contribute to an informed society? [whole issue]

MCBEAN, Bridget
December 2004

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This brief resource highlights the link between development and innovation, and knowledge and information accessibility. The process of creating an informed society depends not only on the availability of information technology and infrastructures, but also and primarily on people, as the creators and users of knowledge. The paper calls for improvements in the e-readiness of developing countries, higher literacy levels and better protection of the right to information

Sustainable ICT

May 2004

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This website was created as part of a DFID-funded research programme on sustainability factors in ICT for development projects. It presents a diverse range of case studies of programmes attempting to use information and commuication technologies as an integrated component of development programming, addressing economic, social and institutional sustainability. A brief description and the key objectives are provided for each, with a link through to each of the actual studies. The website also includes links to the research report, which provides useful analysis

Youth and technology : IPPF/WHR experiences to promote sexual and reproductive health

INTERNATIONAL PLANNED PARENTHOOD FEDERATION. WESTERN HEMISPHERE REGION (IPPF/WHR)
2004

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This report evaluates the experience of member associations of the International Planned Parenthood, Western Hemisphere Region, in the development of programmes that use computer technologies to reach young people with sexual and reproductive health information. It identifies key issues for youth-and-technology projects and makes strategic recommendations for future development. The review of case studies from IPPF/WHR member associations in Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala and Peru provides important insight related to the preliminary effects of and lessons learned from the implementation of first-generation youth and technology projects in the region. Strategic recommendations for the development of second-generation projects in this area are also proposed

Low cost access and connectivity : local solutions

UN ICT TASK FORCE
2004

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This publication, a UN ICT Task Force Working Group Paper, brings together case studies of local initiatives which highlight innovation in meeting the information and communication needs in developing countries. Seven papers explore connectivity and access issues in different countries. Papers on Benin and Cameroon are in French

Electronic immunisation registry and tracking system in Bangladesh

AHMED, M
2004

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This report summarises the 2001 development of a new computerised information system to register, schedule and track the immunisation of children, which was introduced by the Department of Public Health in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh. While no direct funding was provided for it, the assumed cost was not more than US $5000. The author concludes that system has been working well for the past three years. He also notes that the utilisation of ICTs in poor countries should be targeted at those intermediaries (such as health workers) who play a key role in the lives of the poor through high-contact service delivery. Empowering those workers and helping improve the effectiveness of their service delivery will do more for the poor than any number of e-government portals

Turning a crisis into an opportunity : strategies for scaling up the national response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Lesotho

KIMARYO, Scholastica Sylvan
et al
2004

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This book serves as a reference manual for the consultative process undertaken by UNDP in Lesotho on scaling up the national response to HIV and AIDS. It includes key recommendations and strategies on how to create an HIV and AIDS competent society for all levels of leadership including the individual; what national mechanisms and strategies should be used to support longer and healthier lives for the people, from government, to traditional leaders, the Church, businesses, and people living with HIV and AIDS; the establishment of a National AIDS Commission to lead the scaled up national efforts; and strategies for the core-streaming of HIV and AIDS into all government programmes and budgets. The book has been adopted as an official policy document for the Government of Lesotho, guiding its efforts to transform its response to capacity utilisation, institutional and personal accountability, and the creation of an HIV and AIDS competent society

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