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NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US! Cooperation with organisations of persons with disabilities in community programmes A learning guide

LIGHT FOR THE WORLD
June 2019

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Good practices of DPO (Organisations of Persons with Disabilities) involvement in Light for the World programmes are analysed and successful ways of supporting DPO empowerment are reported. The paper is based on interviews and focus group discussions with organisations of persons with disabilities (DPOs), other project partners and Light for the World programme colleagues in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Northeast India and South Sudan

Guidance on strengthening disability inclusion in Humanitarian Response Plans

PERRY, Stephen
LANGE, Kirstin
MITRA, Gopal
WOOD, Gavin
April 2019

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This guidance provides support to seven UN entities on how to strengthen inclusion of disability in Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs) as part of the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Humanitarian Investment Program. The aim of this work is to make humanitarian programming more responsive to the needs of people with disabilities affected by crisis. Humanitarian Response Plans are the product of a strategic planning process that is informed by humanitarian needs assessment activities. Therefore, this guidance focuses primarily on the steps in the humanitarian program cycle (HPC) leading to the HRP, including the process of developing the Humanitarian Needs Overview (HNO). This guidance has been aligned to the 2019 revision of this process

Towards independent living: Collecting examples from Europe

ANGELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
March 2019

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This Collection is a joint initiative of the European Network on Independent Living (ENIL) and the European Disability Forum (EDF). It features examples from different EU Member States, which to a different extent facilitate the right to live independently in the community.

The examples are divided into four areas, presented in different chapters:

  • Legislation and funding: State Funded Peer-Counselling – Estonia; Direct Payments – Ireland.
  • Community-based support: Peer-Counselling for women with disabilities – Austria; Supported living for adults with intellectual disabilities – Croatia; Supported Decision-Making – The Czech Republic; Mobile Mental Health Units – Greece; Personal Assistance for People with Complex Disabilities – Sweden .
  • Involvement of disabled people: Co-Production in Social Care – United Kingdom; Participation of Organisations of People with Disabilities – Italy
  • Self-advocacy: Self-Advocacy of Disabled People – Romania

 

Global survey of inclusive early childhood development and early childhood intervention programs

VARGAS-BARON, Emily
et al
March 2019

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To learn more about the current status of IECD (inclusive early childhood development) and ECI (early childhood intervention) programs, three international organizations collaborated to conduct a global survey: RISE Institute; UNICEF; and the Early Childhood Development Task Force (ECDtf), which is within the Global Partnership on Children with Disabilities (GPcwd). This large survey was designed in 2016, was conducted in 2017, and the report was prepared in 2018.

 

The main objectives of the survey were to:

  • Map current implementation of IECD and ECI programs and related activities;
  • Describe key IECD and ECI program features;
  • Identify gaps and challenges in providing accessible IECD and ECI services;
  • Document factors associated with successful implementation and scale-up;
  • Generate recommendations to inform future policy and program development and national planning and implementation efforts.

 

The online survey targeted a range of programs, and activities including IECD and ECI services; rehabilitation and habilitation services; humanitarian, emergency, and child Global Survey of Inclusive ECD and ECI Programs 8 protection services; advocacy campaigns; and research and evaluation projects. 

 

Program respondents provided information on 426 programs that were implemented in 121 countries. 

Disability and nutrition programming: evidence and learning (Disability Inclusion Helpdesk Report No. 6)

HOLDEN, Jenny
CORBY, Nick
February 2019

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This document provides a rapid review of the evidence on approaches to ensuring people with disabilities are reached through nutrition programming, focusing on children, adolescents, and women of reproductive age in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). The purpose of this review is to support DFID advisers and partners designing and implementing programmes with nutrition components to ensure they are more inclusive of people with disabilities. After outlining the methodology in Section 2, Section 3 includes an overview of available evidence on what works to ensure nutrition programming reaches people with disabilities, as well as an assessment of the strength of the evidence, and highlighting key research gaps. Section 4 provides a summary on factors affecting access for people with disabilities, and Section 5 concludes by drawing a series of considerations for policy and programming to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind when it comes to government-led and development partner-led programmes to tackle malnutrition. Case studies of approaches are included in annex 1 to give further insights on promising practices and key learnings

Disability data collection: A summary review of the use of the Washington Group Questions by development and humanitarian actors

QUIGLEY, Nolan
et al
October 2018

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The Washington Group Questions on Disability are rapidly emerging as the preferred data collection methodology by the global community for national data collection efforts on disability. However, more and more development and humanitarian actors are now using the methodology in their own data collection efforts. This is beyond the original purpose of the questions, which was to generate usable data for governments. Leonard Cheshire and Humanity & Inclusion, two international charities focussed on disability and inclusion, have worked together to share learnings of recent research studies. These studies aim to understand how the Washington Group Questions (WGQ) have been used by development and humanitarian actors and the impact of using the methodology. This summary report outlines the key findings, analysis and conclusions about the application of the Washington Group Questions in a range of contexts. The report concludes with a number of recommendations for different stakeholders.

Including children with disabilities in preschool education. Experiences of Plan International Mozambique

PLAN INTERNATIONAL
August 2018

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Between 2015 and 2017, Plan International Mozambique worked together with communities supporting 106 preschools in rural Mozambique. In late 2016, an approach was piloted in 18 community-based preschools to support them to be disability-inclusive. The overall goal was to increase the number of children with disabilities enrolled in Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) centres delivering quality early learning opportunities. The pilot took place over a 12 month period. Summarised findings about the current status of inclusion in preschool programmes run by Plan International Mozambique, case studies and lessons learned about the inclusion of children with disabilities in these programmes are provided.  

 

They describe five aspects that need to be considered to remove barriers and ensure that children with disabilities can access and benefit from early childhood education:

1. Work directly with the parents of children with disabilities

2. Address individual physical and medical needs of children with disabilities

3. Build the skills and confidence of caretakers

4. Equip and build a strong implementing team

5. Build evidence on what is happening and what (doesn’t) work

Challenges and priorities for global mental health in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) era

ACADEMY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
June 2018

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Published in 2011, the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health initiative provided a framework to guide the research needed to improve treatment and prevention of mental health disorders and expand access to mental health services. At the Academy’s workshop on global mental health participants reflected on progress since 2011, focusing on specific life-course stages, and identified priorities for research in treatment and prevention, as well as enduring challenges and emerging opportunities

Disability inclusion and accountability framework

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2018

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The main objective of the Disability Inclusion and Accountability Framework is to support the mainstreaming of disability in World Bank activities. It lays out a road map for (a) including disability in the Bank's policies, operations and analytical work, and (b) building internal capacity for supporting clients in implementing disability-inclusive development programs. The primary target audience of the Framework is Bank staff but it is also relevant to the Bank's client countries, development partners and persons with disabilities. The framework provides four main principles for guiding the World Bank’s engagement with persons with disabilities: nondiscrimination and equality, accessibility, inclusion and participation, and partnership and collaboration. 

 

The appendices to this framework highlight key areas in which the Bank can have a significant impact on the inclusion, empowerment, and full participation of persons with disabilities. These areas include transport, urban development, disaster risk management, education, social protection, jobs and employment, information and communication technology, water sector operations, and health care. 


Report No. 126977
 

Community mental health: Theory, practices and perspectives

WYNGAERDEN, Francois
May 2018

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Mental health problems are commonplace and affect more than one in four people worldwide. They are responsible for a quarter of all disabilities. This document aims to provide a basis for exploring these concepts as part of more in-depth work, including an update of the 2011 mental health framework document.

 

A seminar was held in Kigali, Rwanda on 7 - 9 December 2017. It brought together 45 participants from 12 countries to think about and discuss community mental health concepts and practices. The objectives of this document are twofold:

• Set out analysis by an external expert, with a focus on community mental health at HI, in light of the literature and concepts and practices within the sector

• Undertake preliminary work to identify new concepts for implementation, based on the aspects covered in the seminar, as part of ongoing in-depth work in this area, including the updating of the 2011 mental health framework document.

 

Case histories from Rwanda, Lebanon and Madascagar are given. There is an extensive bibliography in the Annex

 

This document is intended for HI and partner staff members who work in the mental health and psychosocial support sector. It is also intended for HI staff working on mental health strategy. It can also be used to feed into the work of field staff developing, implementing and assessing mental health and psychsocial support programmes

Defying the barriers

KHONDKAR, Laila
HAQUE, Reazul Md
January 2018

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Research summaries, case studies and process documentation from “Inclusive Protection and Empowerment Project for Children with Disabilities (IPEP)” are presented.  The aim of the project was to build resilience and capacity among children with disabilities and to create a violence-free community for them. The project ran in five districts of Bangladesh i.e. Sylhet, Dhaka, Barishal, Rangpur and Gaibandha from 2014- 2017. 

 

The research topics were:

  • Understanding the Vulnerabilities of Children with Disabilities Living in both Government-run and Private Residential Institutions
  • The Vulnerabilities of Children with Disabilities from Low-income Households
  • Social Protection Schemes Relevant to Children with Disabilities and their Families 

 

Inclusive and integrated mother, newborn and child health programming: Beyond mortality

OLCHINI, Davide
November 2017

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This policy paper describes the operational terms of Handicap International’s mandate and values as applied to Mother, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH). Presenting the approaches and references underpinning Handicap International’s actions, choices and commitments, its purpose is to ensure consistency across its practices while taking account of different contexts. Intended as a document to guide programme staff, the paper defines the topic, describes the target populations and sets out the methods of intervention (activities and expected results) and the indicators used to monitor and evaluate. It also aims to ensure that Handicap International programmes implement all projects in accordance with the presented methods of intervention

 

The SDGs focus on a broader scope of activities and are thus slowly but surely shifting from mortality to address in a more comprehensive manner the well-being and achievement of maximum potential for children and adolescents. With a robust component in sexual and reproductive health, this represents a significant frame of reference for Handicap International’s work in MNCH as it has paved the way for integrating MNCH-related impairments into existing health services. The framework of the SDGs provides a clear vision of the importance of multi-sectorial interventions, which encompass the limit of vertically-organised health systems centred on curative aspects, to offer a more integrated and preventive package of interventions that include chronic conditions, impairments and health for all. After many years of implementing MNCH projects, Handicap International is well-positioned and firmly established as a major player in this process.

Towards inclusion. A guide for organisations and practitioners

VAN EK, Vera
SCHOT, Sander
November 2017

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Inclusive development is about creating societies that value and enfranchise all marginalised groups. It is often not difficult to open up development projects to persons from these marginalised groups. But it does take time before organisations are willing and able to fully commit to inclusion.

Towards Inclusion aims to support organisations who wish to commit to an inclusive approach. It establishes the rationale for inclusion and provides technical advice and tools for putting theory into practice. It is intended to be used as a reference during organisational development, as well as a tool to support good practice in implementation.

If you are looking to support a (development) organisation in the process of becoming an inclusive organisation, then Towards Inclusion is for you

This guide consists of three parts. The first part guides the reader through the process of assessing whether or not the organization is ready to change towards becoming a more inclusive organization. The second part introduces the ACAP framework, which sets up a way of approaching inclusion via focus on the areas: Access, Communication, Attitude and Participation. It then demonstrates how the framework can be applied to projects and programmes. The third part provides guidelines for the people who will guide organizations through the process of change towards becoming inclusive of persons from marginalized groups

Evaluating the impact of a community–based parent training programme for children with cerebral palsy in Ghana

ZUURMOND, Maria
et al
January 2017

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"Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children worldwide, and yet in most low resource settings there are few services available to support children with cerebral palsy or their families. Research is required to understand the effectiveness of community and/or home based programmes to address this gap. This 2-year study aimed to evaluate a participatory caregiver training programme called ‘Getting to know cerebral palsy’ in Ghana. The training programme consisted of a monthly half-day support group with training, and a home visit, delivered across eight sites in Ghana over 10 months. A total of 76 families and children were included at baseline and 64 families followed up one year later at endline. Children were aged between 18months and 12 years with a mean of 3.8 years and a range of severity of cerebral palsy. Nearly all (97%) the caregivers were female and the father was absent in 51% of families. The study was a pre-post intervention design using mixed methods to evaluate the impact. A baseline and endline quantitative survey was conducted to assess caregiver quality of life (QoL) and knowledge about cerebral palsy and child feeding, health, and nutrition outcomes. Qualitative data was collected to explore the impact and experiences of the training programme in more depth".

DFID data disaggregation action plan - Better data for better lives

UK DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
UK AID
January 2017

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This action plan sets out the steps that the UK Department for International Development (DFID) will take to promote, provide and make use of their own development and humanitarian programme data which can be disaggregated on the basis of sex, age, disability status and geography (in the short term). It also has the objective to build the culture within DFID on disaggregated data, and to work with others to change the international development system on disaggregated data. A review is scheduled for 2020. Working with partners, influencing, capacity building and management information, research, analysis and reporting are outlined. Trailblazer country programmes with Bangladesh, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Rwanda are reported.

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities (theme: access to rights-based support for persons with disabilities)

DEVANDAS, Catalina
December 2016

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In her report, the Special Rapporteur provides an overview of the activities undertaken in 2016, as well as a thematic study on access to support by persons with disabilities. The study includes guidance for States on how to ensure the provision of different forms of rights-based support and assistance for persons with disabilities, in consultation with them. In preparing the study, the Special Rapporteur convened a regional expert consultation in Addis Ababa in September 2016 and analysed the responses to a questionnaire sent to Member States, national human rights institutions, agencies of the United Nations system, civil society organisations and persons with disabilities and their representative organisations. As at 5 December 2016, she had received 114 responses. 

Mental health problems in Juba, South Sudan: local perceptions, attitudes and patient care - A socio-anthropological study

LOHINIVA Anna-Leena
May 2016

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Mental health programming is important in post-conflict settings such as South Sudan. Handicap International is currently implementing a project entitled “Touching Mind, Raising Dignity; to stop the stigma toward people with mental health problems” which aims to improve the social and community involvement of people living with mental health problems. This qualitative research study was conducted to understand local concepts linked to mental health problems and health-seeking in order to develop effective mental health interventions in the context of Juba, South Sudan. The study was conducted in four locations in Juba among community members, people with mental health problems, their caregivers and service providers. Focus group discussions & in-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 130 study participants. The interviews were conducted in English or by translating from Juba Arabic. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Respondents used two wide categories when discussing people with mental health problems: mad (majnun) and sad and tired (mariid= sick). Substance abuse related madness and maratsarra (epilepsy) were genuine community concerns. Mild signs and symptoms were not recognized as mental health problems, the causes of mental health problems were viewed as numerous and complex, and mental health problems were believed to be common in South Sudan. 

Mental health funding and the SDGs What now and who pays?

MACKENZIE, Jessica
KESNER, Christie
May 2016

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"This report provides an overview of who is currently funding mental health and who isn’t, but could be. It is a synthesis of research previously conducted in this field and analyses both existing and new funders. It highlights how little information there is on what donors are spending on mental health globally, what types of activities are funded and why funding mental health delivers a variety of benefits, and it suggests how to frame the issue to encourage more investment".

Living in hell : how people with mental health conditions in Indonesia are treated

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH (HRW)
March 2016

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This report examines the abuses—including pasung—that persons with psychosocial disabilities face in the community, mental hospitals, and various other institutions in Indonesia, including stigma, arbitrary and prolonged detention, involuntary treatment, and physical and sexual violence. It also examines the government’s shortcomings in addressing these problems.

Based on research across the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra, Human Rights Watch documented 175 cases of persons with psychosocial disabilities in pasung or who were recently rescued from pasung. 

 

Emergence and structuring of support groups for people living with mental health problems in Togo, Madagascar, Lebanon and South Sudan

CALVOT Thomas,
PEGON Guillaume
February 2016

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"Based on an ethnographic type baseline study conducted on four support groups for people living with mental health problems, evolving in various contexts (prisons, hospitals, refugee camps and mental health centres) in Madagascar, Lebanon, South Sudan and Togo, this study identifies four dynamics contributing to the emergence and the structuring of these groups: survive, get medical care, get organised, advocate." 

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