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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Exploring the links between poverty and disability in rural Bangladesh

DAVIS, Peter
May 2017

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This paper explores the links between poverty and disability drawing from 60 qualitative life-history interviews conducted in rural Bangladesh, in 48 households, in three districts, in March 2016. The paper provides insights into the relationship between poverty and disability with the aim of informing policy and practice concerned with both reducing poverty and improving the life chances of people with disabilities. All of the households had a person with a disability as a member, and in three households, two household members had a disability. Mechanisms by which poverty caused or exacerbated disabilities, and also how people with disabilities fell into poverty, were prevented from escaping poverty, and, in some cases, succeeded in escaping poverty are explored. 
 

Closing the gap in a generation : health equity through action on the social determinants of health|Final report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This is the final report of the World Health Organization’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (2005-2008). The report gives three main recommendations: 1 improve daily living conditions 2. Tackle the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources 3. Measure and understand the problem and assess the impact of action. The Commission was created to provide evidence on policies that improve health by addressing the social conditions in which people live and work. The report is addressed to WHO, national governments, civil society, and other global organizations

FAO working in support of persons with disabilities

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Ed
August 2006

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The aim of this paper is to highlight some of the key linkages between poverty, disability, nutrition and agricultural production. The paper also reports on some of the FAO's work on disability and disability rights and highlights 5 FAO projects / pilot models - ranging from mushroom production to blacksmithing - that target rural people living with disabilities. It would be useful for anyone with an interest in mainstreaming disability in development policy and practice

Child labour, gender inequality and rural/urban disparities : how can Ethiopia’s national development strategies be revised to address negative spill-over impacts on child education and wellbeing?

WOLDEHANNA, Tassew
et al
2005

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This paper is based on a study which sought to understand the impact on child labour and child schooling of public policy interventions formulated within the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP), and how changes are mediated through gender and rural/urban differences

Who is the real chicken?|Namibia

KAHIVERE, Walter
February 2003

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This is one of a series of easy-to-read booklets developed for a series of gender-sensitive workshops aimed at communicating messages on HIV and AIDS to poor, rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Each booklet contains an illustrated story and some questions for discussion

Providing low-cost ICT access to low-income communities in developing countries : what works? what pays?

CASPREY, G
O'CONNOR, D
2003

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This Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development report discusses the potential of and need for telecommunications development in rural areas of low-income countries. It outlines the main challenges, and describes sustainable options. The report also reviews low-cost options and summarizes policies that would support the more rapid diffusion especially telecommunications reform

Changing minds, policies and lives : improving protection of children in eastern Europe and central Asia. Redirecting resources to community-based services

FOX, Louise
POSARAC
REICHENBERG, Judita
2003

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After more than a decade of coping with transition challenges in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the need for the reform of family and child welfare systems has been widely acknowledged. Through Changing minds, policies and lives, UNICEF and the World Bank have teamed up in an effort to developing knowledge and tools for the reform of three essential family welfare system regulators (decision making, standards and financing). This publication provides guidelines for redirecting monetary resources by changing financing flows primarily towards support for families at risk and family-based alternatives. This toolkit is part of a three set collection, the other two focus on standards to ensure family-centered outcomes, and decision making processes to reshape the gate-keeping system

Technical assistance for identifying disability issues related to poverty reduction

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (ADB)
2000

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This article provides tools that help to address the situation of disabled people living in poverty. It helps to identify national policies, programmes, projects and initiatives concerning disability and poverty to develop action plans. The article will be helpful for project and programme managers, policy advisors, NGOs and development aid agencies

Current issues in sector-wide approaches for health development : Uganda case study

BROWN, Adrienne
2000

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This brief document reports on the broad achievements and constraints faced in the health sector in Uganda. Poverty-reduction funds are being channelled into primary care, and improved management of public funds is helping the situation. However, capacity beyond the Ministry of Health is limited, and decentralization, with unclear policy links in the regions, is a challenge. There is some evidence of success in using funding strategies to reorient services to primary care and prevention

Empowering the rural disabled in Asia and the Pacific

HADIWIGENO, Soetatwo
et al
1999

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This article provides a summary of papers related to rural rehabilitation in the Asia and Pacific regions. An introduction is given, including a table reviewing the region's disability statistics, and seven paper summaries are highlighted. This article would be useful for people interested in rural rehabilitation in the Asia and Pacific region

Whose reality counts? : putting the first last

CHAMBERS, Robert
1997

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This book describes how very poor communities are often not developed due to the fact that interventions are not taking place in "communities" or "areas" where people suffer most from the effects of poverty. It is a thought provoking book for rural development planners and CBR workers

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