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Disability and inclusive education - A stocktake of education sector plans and GPE-funded grants

BANHAM, Louise
PAPAKOSTI, Elena
et al
March 2018

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This report was commissioned by the Global Partnership for Education’s Secretariat to take stock of how disability and inclusive education are included in education sector plans in 51 countries, including GPE-funded programs, such as education sector program implementation grants, program documents, implementation progress reports education sector analysis, if applicable, and other relevant GPE program documents.

This report documents progress and highlights the need to step up support to GPE partner countries on disability and inclusive education, to improve consideration of issues around disability and inclusion in education sector analysis and sector planning processes to better promote the achievement of GPE 2020 strategic goal 2, and to fulfill the transformative vision of Agenda 2030

Costing equity: The case for disability-responsive education financing

MYERS, Juliette
October 2016

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This report contributes to the global discourse on education finance by providing a disability perspective on donor and government investment into inclusive education. The report looks at the benefits of financing disability - inclusive education, the current state of education financing with regard to inclusion, and what needs to change in order for education financing to effectively support the realisation of Sustainable Development Goal 4 and Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD). Representatives of nine leading bilateral and multilateral education donors were surveyed on their agencies’ efforts towards disability inclusive education: DFAT (Australia), DFID (UK), European Union, GIZ (Germany), Global Partnership for Education, Norad (Norway), UNICEF, USAID (USA), and World Bank

Learning generation. Investing in education for a changing world.

THE INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON FINANCING GLOBAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY
September 2016

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The International Commission on Financing Global Education Opportunity was set up to reinvigorate the case for investing in education and to chart a pathway for increased investment in order to develop the potential of all of the world’s young people. To achieve its goals, the Commission proposes a range of measures to finance education and a set of strategic reforms necessary for ensuring finance delivers real learning results. These actions aim to engage domestic and international partners across governments, the private sector, and civil society. This report summarizes the Commission’s findings and conclusions. It draws upon new research by partners around the world, new expert analysis of the existing evidence base, and wide-reaching global consultations with practitioners, education providers, ministers of finance and education, policymakers, and partners in education. More than 300 partners in 105 countries engaged in this process. The report also draws on the conclusions of dedicated expert panels on technology, health and education, and finance, as well as a youth panel. The Education Commission concludes that it is possible to get all young people into school and learning within a generation – despite the scale of the challenge, we can create a Learning Generation. 

Inclusive education : an EFA strategy for all children

PETERS, Susan J
November 2004

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This paper studies inclusive education from within the context of the Education For All strategy. It examines experience of inclusive education and lessons learned from both northern and southern countries, and discusses economic issues (such as cost-effectiveness) and legal issues

Achieving universal primary education by 2015 : a chance for every child

BRUNS, Barbara
MINGAT, Alain
RAKOTOMALALA, Ramahatra
2003

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This study assesses whether universal primary completion can be achieved by 2015, the target date set by the Millennium Development Goals. This study focuses on the following two data gaps in many developing countries: the education policies that in many countries are needed for faster progress and the incremental financing required to support this progress. This study is useful for anyone interested in universal primary completion

Mental health financing : mental health policy and service guidance package

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2003

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"This module provides practical guidance to assist countries with the financing of mental health care. The aims of the module are to: (1) provide a conceptual introduction to key issues related to the financing of mental health care; (2) set out a step-by-step approach addressing these key financing issues, recognizing that the steps may need to be adapted and tailored to the circumstances of each country; (3) link the steps to activities defined in other modules. The Introduction emphasizes financing as a major driver of the system and indicates the need to integrate this function with policy-making and planning. Steps are then presented to assist countries in their financing efforts. These steps are not intended to be prescriptive or rigid. Instead they identify critical activities related to financing which should be addressed in order to build and sustain a mental health system that meets priority needs and produces desired outcomes. Barriers to mental health financing are also reviewed"
Note: This module is part of a guidance package that consists of a series of interrelated user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in mental health policy development and service planning. Its recommended for use by policy makers, service planners representatives or associations of families and carers of people with mental disorders

Open file on inclusive education : support materials for managers and administrators

UNITED NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
2002

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This report brings together experience from a wide range of countries. It identifies underlying principles, which inform practice across a wide range of contexts, and provides brief illustrations from a number of countries. It aims to help education administrators and decision-makers to move beyond the making of policy commitments towards the implementation of inclusive education

Review of the present situation in special needs education

HEGARTY, Seamus
1995

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An overall comparison between the two situations - 1986 and 1993 - reported here and in the previous report allow for some guarded optimism. Most countries provided some information on policies but varied greatly in the amount of detail offered. Special educational provision is more firmly located within regular education, at school and the administrative levels, than before and has greater legislative underpinning. Within the policy statements, themselves, the most common strands related to : developing the individual's potential, integration and necessary steps for implementation. Regarding legislation, most countries did include special needs provision in the same regulatory framework as general education; the most common reason given for excluding particular children was severity of disability. Much remains to be done and there is no room for complacency. Many countries face fiscal and personnel constraints, and maintaining let alone increasing existing investment in special educational provision will not be easy. A word of caution : even where resources are not the central issue, the pressures created by the general school reforms taking place in many countries may reduce the priority given to speical educational provision. However, progress has been made, despite the many difficulties.

Rural finance and investment learning centre

RURAL FINANCE AND INVESTMENT LEARNING CENTRE

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The Rural Finance and Investment Learning Centre (RFILC) is a web platform dedicated to the dissemination of cutting-edge knowledge for the promotion of rural and agricultural finance and investment in developing countries. It provides access to related materials for capacity development and policy design, in addition to the dissemination of news, events and multimedia

Target clients include all public and private organisations working towards greater financial inclusion and rural and agricultural development, such as financial institutions, governments, civil society organisations, development agencies and academia, among others. Materials such as training manuals, policy guides, and on-line training sessions are disseminated through the RFILC with the purpose of further developing clients’ capacity to deliver improved financial services that meet the needs of rural enterprises and households

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