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How can social protection responses to COVID-19 be made disability inclusive?

BANKS, Lena Morgon
HUNT, Xanthe
June 2020

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Question & problem

The COVID-19 pandemic and strategies essential for its containment are resulting in severe strains on economies, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). These impacts will be felt most by groups already in or at risk of poverty, including the estimated 1 billion people with disabilities globally. Interventions to address the short- and long-term economic effects of the pandemic are urgently needed. Some countries have begun implementing or announced plans for interventions addressing the economic impacts of COVID-19, such as food assistance, emergency cash transfers, unemployment assistance or expansions to existing social protection programmes. As these programmes are developed, it is important to consider the extent to which their design and delivery is inclusive of people with disabilities. Failure to adequately include people with disabilities in this process will lead to widening inequalities.

What are the key considerations for including people with disabilities in COVID-19 hygiene promotion programmes?

WILBUR, Jane
HUNT, Xanthe
August 2019

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Question & problem

People with disabilities may be more likely to acquire COVID-19, and if infected may be more likely to experience serious symptoms, or die. Aside from those consequences of the pandemic related to morbidity and mortality, people with disabilities are often reliant on carers to aid with common daily tasks, and so social distancing measures may be unfeasible. Furthermore, safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services and facilities may be inaccessible to people with disabilities, and, in many settings, efforts to deliver services in a socially-distanced world have resulted in the roll out of digital or remote healthcare approaches which are sometimes not accessible or inclusive. One of the key interventions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been international attention, and improved funding, programming and media messaging in support of WASH. People with disabilities – who are most at risk of negative consequences of COVID-19 – most need access to such interventions. Yet, WASH access is considered to be one of the biggest challenges of daily life for many people with disabilities.

Uzbekistan: Case for inclusion

NAM, Galina
2019

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The inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream education has become an important agenda for many developing countries. The Uzbekistan government has also attempted to provide equal educational opportunities to this previously excluded group of children. Despite these efforts, however, many children with disabilities remain segregated. The total number of children with disabilities under 16 years old in the country is 97,000 (Uzbek Society of Disabled People, 2014). The majority of them either study at specialised educational institutions, or receive home-based education. Those who are placed at specialised institutions are often deprived of resources and services necessary to receive adequate education (UNICEF, 2013). While limited by the lack of reliable empirical data and research, this article aims to present the current situation in the development of inclusive education in Uzbekistan. It outlines the major legislative documents intended to support inclusive education and identifies some of the current obstacles to inclusive education practices.

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 30, No 1 (2019)

Exploring the experiences of students with visual impairments at the University of Botswana

OATS, Reginald
DISELE, Chawapiwa
2019

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Purpose: This paper sought to document the responsiveness of the University of Botswana towards the academic needs of students with visual impairments. The study examined the academic experiences of students with visual impairments enrolled at the University and explored their information-seeking needs. The study was informed by the theory of social justice.

Method: This was a qualitative study. Data was collected from students with visual impairments and academic staff from different faculties at the University of Botswana, through document analysis, interviews and observation techniques.

Results: The findings revealed that students with visual impairments experience extra challenges compared to students without disabilities. This is mainly because they do not get full support to enable them to excel academically. Furthermore, lecturers use teaching methodologies that do not accommodate these students, and learning materials are not adapted to formats suitable for them. Access to information is another major concern that hinders the participation of students with visual impairments in tertiary institutions.

Conclusion: The study recommends that lecturers need to be trained on suitable methods to teach students with visual impairments and how best to deliver academic content to them.

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 30, No 1 (2019)

Disability and inclusive education - A stocktake of education sector plans and GPE-funded grants

BANHAM, Louise
PAPAKOSTI, Elena
et al
March 2018

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This report was commissioned by the Global Partnership for Education’s Secretariat to take stock of how disability and inclusive education are included in education sector plans in 51 countries, including GPE-funded programs, such as education sector program implementation grants, program documents, implementation progress reports education sector analysis, if applicable, and other relevant GPE program documents.

This report documents progress and highlights the need to step up support to GPE partner countries on disability and inclusive education, to improve consideration of issues around disability and inclusion in education sector analysis and sector planning processes to better promote the achievement of GPE 2020 strategic goal 2, and to fulfill the transformative vision of Agenda 2030

Women and girls with disabilities. Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. General comment No. 3 (2016). Article 6.

OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONERS FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (OHCHR)
September 2016

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"International and national laws and policies on disability have historically neglected aspects related to women and girls with disabilities. In turn, laws and policies addressing women have traditionally ignored disability". "Article 6 serves as an interpretation tool to approach the responsibilities of States parties across the Convention, to promote, protect and fulfil the human rights of women and girls with disabilities, from a human rights-based approach and a development perspective". These general comments take the form of an introduction, normative content, states parties’ obligations, the interrelationship of article 6 with other articles of the Convention (perspectives of women with disabilities in CRPD provisions) and national implementation

Ensuring that no one is left behind. High-level political forum (HLPF) 2016 position paper by Persons with Disabilities.

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
2016

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This position paper states that "only by utilising the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as a guiding framework in implementing the SDGs, will it be ensured that exclusion and inequality are not created or perpetuated". Proposals are made and background presented on the topics of: the unfinished work of the MDGs; realising, through an enabling environment, the full potential of persons with disabilities; working together to protect our planet; and reaching the farthest behind first

Gender and disability : a way forward to overcoming multiple discrimination

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents key information about the inclusion of disability in gender policies and programs. It highlights key facts and issues such as women and girls with disabilities facing multiple discrimination, gaps in political and program responses and legal policy and frameworks. It outlines practical steps can be taken by development actors at different levels and suggests ways to measure progress

 

Advocacy briefing paper

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

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“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Dialogues on sustainable development : a disability-inclusive perspective

KEOGH Mary
2015

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“This publication, with contributions from civil society, UN agencies and EU institutions as well as disability and development organisations…highlights the many commonalities between disability-inclusive development and a range of overarching development themes. It is structured around the three basic elements of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental sustainability – and discusses a range of sub topics relevant to these areas” 

 

Note: easy-to-read version is provided as a related resource link

Making sure people with disabilities everywhere can have a better future

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
2015

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“This easy-to-read version outlines countries’ development plans looking at how all people in the world can have a better life. The plans involve jobs and money, having a say, women and girls, making cities easier to live in, being clean and safe, coping when big problems happen and having access to information. A case study is also provided

Inclusion : the key to essential disaster risk management

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI)
2015

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This briefing paper outlines the importance of including people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in disaster risk management. The paper gives on overview of the basic principles of inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) before providing recommendations for practitioners, states and donors

 

Strengthening participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy

SIMMONS, Dr. Catharine
ROBINSON, Dr. Sally
October 2014

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Participation by children and young people in advocacy and change-making can not only improve and foster positive change in their own lives, but also influence the lives of others. When young people’s participation is supported, meaningful and engaged, multiple benefits accrue; their perspectives and experiences bring a unique contribution and can result in rights-based empowerment, enacted citizenship and improved relationships. This has the potential to shape policy, to increase the relevance and responsiveness of organisations they use, and to influence change in their communities in positive ways

 

However, there are significant issues and a range of barriers that discourage, prevent or actively exclude children and young people with disability from participating. A culture of low expectations, social and cultural barriers, relationship and identity difficulties and practical hurdles exist for many young people. As a result, many are precluded from participation, particularly around change-making activities

 

This paper examines how meaningful participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy and change-making can be strengthened. In the paper CDA calls for the promotion of children and young people’s participation as active and valued community members

The way forward on victim assistance : a consideration of the various aspects at play when integrating assistance to survivors into disability-inclusive development

HOTTENTOT, Elke
et al
August 2014

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This paper outlines specific elements when considering victim assistance in light of the CRPD and disability-inclusive development. It highlights the rights of survivors by ensuring improvement in their quality of life and transforming societies into being more inclusive of their diverse members, including survivors and other people with disabilities and families of casualties

Victim assistance in the context of mines and explosive remnants of war

HOTTENTOT, Elke
July 2014

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This policy paper presents background information on victim assistance in the context of landmines and cluster munitions. It describes how it is rooted in two instruments of international humanitarian law and guided by the CRPD, and reviews the current situation in terms of Handicap International’s day-to-day interventions and outlines a vision of VA that is in line with their 2011 – 2015 strategy. Overall, it aims to contribute to a common position and coherent communication on VA among Handicap International staff, whether at the operational, advocacy, communication or campaigning level and to instigate new ways of operating in order to capitalize on the opportunity presented by VA at this point in time
PP 1

Victim assistance issue briefs : how to ensure mine/ERW survivors benefit from and participate in disability-inclusive development

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2014

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Following on from the Way Forward Paper, this paper is a set of three issue briefs proposing specific efforts and recommendations for informing and influencing policy to ensure mine and explosive remnants of war survivors participate in, and benefit from, disability-inclusive development. The three topics are locating and identifying survivors, improving access to services, and measuring progress on the implementation of victim assistance

Old age, disability and mental health : data issues for a post-2015 framework

SAMMAN, Emma
RODRIGUEZ-TAKEUCHI, L. K
May 2013

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"This Background Note focuses on inequalities associated with old age, disability and mental health. It argues that these should be considered salient sources of group-based difference, given the numbers of people affected, their marginalisation and vulnerability, and their relative neglect in international agreements to date. This note identifies a lack of data as a particular concern, but one that can be addressed through revisions to standard household surveys. To this end, the paper discusses the available data and their limitations, constraints to better data collection and efforts needed to adjust key international survey instruments -the World Bank’s Core Welfare Indicator Questionnaire (CWIQ) and Living Standards and Measurement Survey (LSMS), Macro International’s Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and the UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS)- to collect reliable data on these issues. It sets out technical adjustments that would enable these surveys to broaden their coverage, collect richer information and improve their identification of these three groups. It concludes by commenting on how measures to address the inequalities that affect these groups could be incorporated within a new post-2015 framework agreement"
ODI Background note

Maternal and new-born care practices among disabled women, and their attendance in community groups in rural Makwanpur, Nepal

LEONARD CHESHIRE DISABILITY AND INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
2013

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This paper presents qualitative and quantitative research that describes the type and severity of disability of married women in the study area, describes their participation in community groups and analyses associations between maternal and new-born care behaviours and disability. Health workers and field researchers were also interviewed about their experience with disabled women in rural Makwanpur
Cross-cutting Disability Research Programme, Background Paper: 01

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