Resources search

Cambodia Capacity Building Learning Review and Annex

LIPSON, Brenda
March 2016

Expand view

ADD look at multiple factors, and others specific to the situation of organisations of People with Disabilities (PWD), to generate certain conditions which inform the choice of capacity building approach. In particular, ADD Cambodia’s commitment to an empowering and participative approach which aims to build sustainable organisations of PWD is a direct response to many of the negative factors. It underpins the ADD Cambodia strategy, as they work to “….help disabled people (sic) have their own ideas and develop their own approaches”. This commitment is critical for working in a new context where international donors are increasingly withdrawing from the country, as they are defining it as a newly emerging middle-income country.

Cross-cutting Capacity Building Learning Review

LIPSON, Brenda
GARBUTT, Anne
March 2016

Expand view

This short report is based on an analysis of the individual case studies on capacity building in Cambodia and Bangladesh. The purpose of this cross-case report is to present the views of the two consultants with regard to the following:

  • Points arising from the experiences in the two countries which shed light on the ADD approach and working model of capacity building.
  • Recommendations for ADD to reflect upon in its work to strengthen the capacity building model and the overall monitoring, evaluation and learning on this work.

Capacity building. ADD international’s approach. A learning paper

ADD
2016

Expand view

In 2016 ADD commissioned an independent learning review of their Capacity Building model. The review focused on ADD experience in Cambodia and Bangladesh, and was carried out by Anne Garbutt of INTRAC and Brenda Lipson of Framework. The review confirmed that the ADD approach is working as they thought, that it is effective, and that it contributes to positive change in line with ADD Theory of Change.

Voices of the marginalised

2016

Expand view

The aim of 'Voices of the Marginalised' is to bring the perspectives of those who live in poverty or who are highly marginalised, including those with disabilities, older people and people living with mental health problems, into post-2015 policymaking. Focusing on Bangladesh and Tanzania, people with disabilities and older people were asked to become researchers themselves, and were trained to collect and analyse stories from peers in rural and urban areas.

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

Expand view

“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Community based rehabilitation (CBR) : critical perspectives from Latin America

GRECH, Shaun
2015

Expand view

“CBR Perspectives from Latin America” is a critical reflection on the multi-dimensional and changing nature of CBR, the perceived benefits, the conundrum of standardized approaches versus community driven processes, the nature of links between CBR and human rights, the resourcing of CBR and the difficulty inherent in taking a short term view in the evaluation of what is a long term process. Not so often are the experiences and perspectives from Latin America shared to a wider audience, making Dr. Grech’s work a remarkable achievement for the Region.”

Beyond 2015 : shaping the future of equality, human rights and social justice

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY FORUM
EDF RESEARCH NETWORK
June 2015

Expand view

This publication is a collection of essays from Equality and Diversity Forum and EDF Research Network Beyond 2015 project. It presents a collection of articles about three main concepts: equality, human rights and social justice in the United Kingdom. The collection principally serves to describe levers for change and scenarios where equality and human rights could be promoted

Malawi : DoDMA exploring indigenous knowledge on disasters

KAZEMBE, Ida
May 2015

Expand view

This article contains an interview with Mulder Mkutumula, Mitigation Officer at the Department of Disaster Management Affairs in Malawi. Mr. Mkutumula discusses the importance of raising awareness and understanding of disaster risk reduction in Malawi, especially in the context of the 2015 floods

Mental health recommendations included in Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction

UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY
March 2015

Expand view

“The expert group was formed to address this challenge, bringing together UN experts to review evidence on mental well-being and disability related to disasters, share lessons learned and best practices, and develop recommendations for mainstreaming these issues in Disaster Risk Education.” This UN University report illustrates how disability and mental health should be highlighted as a priority in disaster risk reduction planning and execution. In addition, the group responsible for the report suggest that disability and mental health be integrated into any future discussions related to security and human rights. Finally, the group recommended that a United Nations working group be established to explore the ways in which policies and action effect or how these individuals can affect policy within the United Nations. 

Andrew Mohanraj : mental well-being, disability and disaster risk reduction

MOHANRAJ, Andrew
January 2015

Expand view

This video is an interview of Andrew Mohanraj, Regional Mental Health Development Advisor from the Christian Blind Mission (CBM) International. He explains why mental well-being and disability are important issues to consider in disaster preparedness and recovery, how efforts to reduce disaster risks can better address the needs of persons with mental and physical disabilities, and lessons learned from his own experience

A 10-year literature review of the impact of community based rehabilitation

BOWERS, Bob
KUIPERS, Pim
DORSETT, Pat
2015

Expand view

A thematic literature review of the impact of CommunityBased Rehabilitation (CBR) in low to middle-income countries was conducted. The review covered the period from 2002 to 2012, and the CBR Matrix was utilised to provide structure for the evidence. Seven studies that investigated the impact of CBR interventions in developing countries were included. A modified harvest plot was used to summarise the strength and nature of evidence provided in relation to the CBR Matrix. Quantitative studies tended to focus on the Health domain, while qualitative studies generally focussed on the Social and Empowerment domains. No evidence of CBR impact was found in the Education domain, and very little evidence was found pertaining to Livelihood. Overall, the evidence base related to the impact of CBR remains limited, both in terms of quantity and robustness of design.

 

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development (DCID), Vol 26, No 2

The right to adequate housing for persons with disabilities living in cities

UNITED NATIONS HABITAT
2015

Expand view

“This study reviews the literature on the meaning and impact of the right to adequate housing for persons with disabilities in cities. It uses the foundational framework of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and demonstrates how the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) provides a new understanding of this complex right”

 

Adequate Housing Series

Partnerships for disability research in Africa: Lessons learned in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

ALDERSEY, Heather
WENDA, Delphine Assumani
2015

Expand view

Issues concerning individuals with disabilities are under-researched in Africa, and persons with disabilities remain some of the most highly disadvantaged groups. In an increasing era of globalization, partnerships across borders and boundaries to conduct disability research is inevitable. Yet, such partnerships might be complicated by issues such as unequal power dynamics, poverty, and cultural misunderstandings, among others. In this article, the authors reflect upon their experience partnering for disability research across cultures, with one author being a Congolese person with a disability and the other being a Canadian ally. They discuss the nature of their research relationship, challenges they faced while conducting a seven-month study of personhood and support for people with intellectual disabilities in Kinshasa, and how they addressed these challenges. They also outline lessons learned from this partnership and how their past experience collaborating for disability research will shape their future endeavours.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

Expand view

Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Expert group meeting on mental well-being, disability and disaster risk reduction

ITO, Akiko
December 2014

Expand view

This Expert Group Meeting was organised by United Nations University International Institute of Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, in close collaboration with the World Bank Tokyo Development Center (TDLC) and the National Institute of Mental Health, Japan.  This video provides an overview of issues, trends and international norms and standards, as well as good practices and lessons learned from different countries related to mental well-being, disability and disaster risk reduction that were discussed

Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Disaster Reduction

Tokyo, Japan

November 2014

Learning from doing the EquitAble project: Content, context, process, and impact of a multi-country research project on vulnerable populations in Africa

MACLACHLAN, Mac
AMIN, Mutamad
MJI, Gubela
MANNAN, Hasheem
MCVEIGH, Joanne
MCAULIFFE, Eilish
AMADHILA, Elina
MUNTHALI, Alister
EIDE, Arne H
DUBE, A Kudakwashe
2014

Expand view

Background: The ‘EquitAble’ project carried out content analyses of policies and collected and analysed qualitative and quantitative data concerning access to health services in Sudan, Malawi, Namibia and South Africa. Our particular concern was to address the situation of people with disabilities, although not in isolation from other marginalised or vulnerable groups.

 

Objectives: This article reports on the content, context, process and impact of project EquitAble, funded by the European Commission Seventh Research Framework Programme, which brought together researchers from Ireland, Norway, South Africa, Namibia, Sudan and Malawi.

 

Method: After the 4-year project ended in February 2013, all members of the consortium were asked to anonymously complete a bespoke questionnaire designed by the coordinating team. The purpose of the questionnaire was to capture the views of those who collaborated on the research project in relation to issues of content, context, process and impact of the EquitAble project.

 

Results: Our results indicated some of the successes and challenges encountered by our consortium.

 

Conclusion: We identified contextual and process learning points, factors often not discussed in papers, which typically focus on the reporting of the ‘content’ of results.

The future framework for disaster risk reduction : a guide for decision makers

KELLETT, Jan
et al
June 2014

Expand view

“This guide to the future framework for disaster risk reduction (DRR) is intended for decision-makers, particularly those in government responsible for contributing to the new agreement. The guide is organised into a set of modules, each representing important aspects of the successor to the existing Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA). By presenting evidence in the form of data, facts and summary messages, the modules [in this report] highlight what should be covered by a new agreement. There are seven modules: Making the case, The architecture, Financing, Vulnerability, and inclusion, Climate change, Conflict and fragility,  Stakeholders and leadership”

Inclusion works : lessons learned on the inclusion of people with disabilities in a food security project for ultra poor women in Bangladesh

BRUIJN, Paulien
May 2014

Expand view

People with disabilities are often amongst the poorest in the developing world, and yet they are usually left out of development projects. Inclusion of persons with disabilities in mainstream development programmes is a relatively new concept in development. The ICCO Gaibandha Food Security Project in Bangladesh is one of the first programmes that has mainstreamed disability on a large scale. This book represents the lessons that are learned about mainstreaming disability in this programme. It is a source of inspiration and offers practical suggestions to make a start with including people with disabilities in (food security) projects

Pages

E-bulletin