Resources search

OPERA framework

July 2016

Expand view

"A guiding lens for CESR's national enforcement work, the OPERA framework allows an assessment that triangulates outcomes, policies and resources to provide a much fuller picture of what a state is doing to promote the realization of specific rights. Importantly, it traces economic and social deprivations and disparities back to the actions or omissions of the state, to make the case that they constitute an injustice and a violation of human rights."

Palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa : an appraisal

HARDING, Richard
HIGGINSON, Irene
2004

Expand view

This report was written from the belief that palliative care is, and will be for the forseeable future, an essential component in the continuum of managing HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. There is now a wealth of experience in sub-Saharan Africa about the ways in which palliative care can be delivered both affordably and effectively. However, there remains a lack of properly documented evidence and research to demonstrate the importance of this work and promote its development. This report provides a review of existing evaluations of palliative care projects in sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on isolating the factors that lead to sustainability, local ownership and scaling up; the role of palliative care in the management of HIV/AIDS and how to integrate palliative care and Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART); primary health based care projects in two countries, Kenya and Malawi, that could provide lessons for the implementation of palliative care; lessons from other parallel programmes which mirror palliative care delivery, for example, tuberculosis programmes, and primary care programmes with good links to local clinics and hospitals, and community mobilization and empowerment projects linked to health facilities. In this way it contributes to the effort of providing an evidence base to demonstrate the importance of palliative care and provides a source of reference for policy makers, practitioners, donors and researchers

Evaluation and utilization of traditional methods of communication in Cameroon's central, southern, eastern and extreme northern regions : case study 20

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO). Communication for Development Group
August 2003

Expand view

This study's main objectives are to evaluate traditional means of communication; to note their constraints; to select the traditional methods which can best be used for the diffusion of information and to devise a strategy for implementing the selected method of traditional communication. The methodology of this survey is based on the Active Method of Participative Research.
The study illustrates that the traditional media for communication in Cameroon are: the gong and songs accompanied by dances (in all of the surveyed provinces); the xylophone (in the center and south); griot [travelling poet] and balafon (in the east); colleagues of the traditional chiefs (Lawanes, Djaoros); and messengers of traditional chiefs or muezzins (extreme north).There are numerous constraints to using individuals in devising communications strategies: a lack of trained musicians, the lack of initiative on the part of the village elders, the disinterest of the youth, conflict among the different generations, the proliferation of modern communications technologies, the complexity of training in various methods, the possible alteration of messages, a lack of motivation and the slow speed of transmission. The study notes that the best methods for the diffusion of information in the regions surveyed in Cameroon are: the gong, the colleagues and messengers of traditional chiefs to organize village meetings in which reproductive health issues could be raised, singing and dancing, travelling poets and xylophones.
In order to devise effective strategies for conveying messages about reproductive health through these traditional methods of communication, traditional authorities must be engaged early on in the process and informed of the importance of these means of communication; qualified individuals must be identified as resources and others trained; and a training of trainers must be conducted

How can we learn more from what we do? Evaluation and evidence-based communications for development : summary record of workshop

EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT POLICY MANAGEMENT (ECDPM)
EXCHANGE PROGRAMME
2003

Expand view

This workshop report summarises presentations and discussion addressing issues such as: how can the learning and social/organisational change function of evaluation best be balanced with the control/accountability function? How can what we learn feed debate and change processes within organisations, among partners and in society at large? What linkages exist between the different levels? How can evidence from evaluations help spur national debate on policy options for development and motivate home-grown change processes?

Health : an ecosystem approach

LEBEL, Jean
2003

Expand view

Can people remain healthy in a world that is sick? Many ecological disasters can be directly traced to careless exploitation of the environment, with human beings as first perpetrator and then victim. Our health closely mirrors the health of our surroundings: this is the basis of the Ecohealth approach. It recognizes the links between humans and their biophysical, social, and economic environments, and that these links are reflected in the population's state of health. This is a new area of research, requiring input from scientists, community and interest groups, and decision-makers. This book describes this new approach, providing lessons and recommendations from various IDRC-supported research activities. It demonstrates how decision-makers, in particular, can use the ecohealth approach to formulate policies and solutions that are both immediately visible and sustainable over the long term

To handle life's challenges : a tracer study of Servol's Adolescent Development Programme in Trinidad

GRIFFITH, Jean
February 2002

Expand view

Can a 14-week programme for adolescents have a lasting effect on their lives? This tracer study shows that, 10 years on, 40 Trinidadians in their 20s are doing their best to meet life's challenges. These young people, many from backgrounds of disadvantage and abuse, took part in the Adolescent Development Programme run by SERVOL. The study compares their outcomes with a similar group of people and, while the differences between the groups are small, there are some distinctions. The former trainees themselves believe that the course enhanced their parenting skills and had a positive impact on their lives. The report also shares learning from the project

Getting research into policy and practice (GRIPP)

JOHN SNOW INTERNATIONAL (JSI) UK
POPULATION COUNCIL. Frontiers in Reproductive Health (FRONTIERS) programme
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON KNOWLEDGE PROGRAMMES. Opportunites and Choices. Safe Passages

Expand view

This website is a resource for researchers to aid them in changing policy by directly accessing and communicating with policy makers. The website has three components. One is a database of case studies documenting the process of getting research into practice. This gives an opportunity to researchers to share their experiences. The second section (on the left hand side of the website) comprises links to web pages for each component of the GRIPP process, giving examples of factors to consider and directions to resources relating to each step of the process. The third aspect of the website is a list of more general GRIPP related resources and a place where it is hoped that researchers will contribute comments related to both the content and activities of the website

ODI Research and policy in development (RAPID) Programme

Expand view

This website for ODI's Research and Policy in Development (RAPID) programme provides a range of information on the use of research and evidence in development policy and practice. The site includes lessons from the programme so far, current and past projects, bibliographies, and links to related work. The RAPID programme aims to improve the use of research in development policy and practice through improved knowledge about research-policy links; improved knowledge management and learning systems; improved communication; and improved awareness of the importance of research. It addresses the role of evidence in policy processes; improved communication and information systems for policy and practice; and approaches to institutional development for evidence-based policy

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates