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Advocacy impact assessment guidelines

LLOYD LANEY, Megan
2004

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DFID’s major advocacy activities focus on influencing agencies and governments to invest in infrastructure. However, it is hard to find concrete evidence of the contributions that advocacy makes towards poverty eradication. These guidelines describe an approach that many NGOs take to assess advocacy impacts. There are different types of advocacy impacts, known as different dimensions of change, and these guidelines describe some indicators for the following dimensions: changes in policies and their implementation; private sector change; strengthening civil society; and aiding democracy and improving the material situation of individuals. Participatory monitoring and evaluation asks the people being affected by a project whether it has made a difference. However, this is often more complex than standard evaluation systems and it is necessary to be clear about the goals of the process and who should be involved. In order to assess impact, it is necessary to know the existing situation prior to advocacy, and to monitor progress against this. Once you have the information, it needs to be analysed. Lessons can then be learned and evaluation results used to demonstrate that advocacy works

Routemapping culture and development : report on a pilot research project exploring the use of cultural approaches to development within five UK development agencies

GOULD, Helen
MARSH, Mary
2004

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This research highlights the inconsistent approach and limited explicit policy with reference to cultural activities in development, despite finding over 350 examples across five development agencies over two years. The study considers the different uses of culture in development, finding a lack of consistency in implementing projects, little understanding of how cultural processes work, and few examples of appropriate evaluation

Working from within : culturally sensitive approaches in UNFPA programming

UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND (UNFPA)
2004

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The nine case studies presented in this brochure are drawn from a longer UNFPA report entitled, "Culture Matters: Working with Communities and Faith-based Organizations". It highlights the necessity of mainstreaming cultural analysis and sensitivity in development efforts addressing issues such as gender equality and equity, HIV/AIDS, female genital cutting, gender-based violence and reproductive health. Presents an outline of key principles for working within cultures in a culturally sensitive way, and briefly looks at examples of programming in a number of countries highlighting what works in each case

Turning a crisis into an opportunity : strategies for scaling up the national response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Lesotho

KIMARYO, Scholastica Sylvan
et al
2004

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This book serves as a reference manual for the consultative process undertaken by UNDP in Lesotho on scaling up the national response to HIV and AIDS. It includes key recommendations and strategies on how to create an HIV and AIDS competent society for all levels of leadership including the individual; what national mechanisms and strategies should be used to support longer and healthier lives for the people, from government, to traditional leaders, the Church, businesses, and people living with HIV and AIDS; the establishment of a National AIDS Commission to lead the scaled up national efforts; and strategies for the core-streaming of HIV and AIDS into all government programmes and budgets. The book has been adopted as an official policy document for the Government of Lesotho, guiding its efforts to transform its response to capacity utilisation, institutional and personal accountability, and the creation of an HIV and AIDS competent society

Tecnologías y Sistemas de Información al servicio de la salud|[Technologies and systems of information in health]

ARELLANO Rodríguez, Madelein
GAMBOA Cáceres, Teresa
2004

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The purpose of this article is to discuss the potential of the technologies of information in health and to characterise in a preliminary way the subsystems of information in health according to the nature of the information. Although the investigation is fundamentally bibliographical conceptual, it is based on an empirical study of the systems of information in two Venezuelan regions with local governments of different political orientation. Concludes that responsive systems of information in health should contain information coming from different sources: epidemiological, clinical, nutritional, sociodemographic, environmental and occupational, scientific-technique and administrative, and merit as much attention in health as administration of resources. Therefore, coordinated action of ministries of health is required with different institutions

ICT for development : empowerment or exploitation

BEARDON, Hannah
2004

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A mid-term review of the Reflect ICT project, which uses a participatory approach to ICT and communication for development and empowerment. The review reinforces Reflect's position that it is the process whereby ICTs are chosen and introduced which determines their impact, as much or more than the investment itself, and describes pilot projects in Uganda, Burundi and India which illustrate the Reflect approach and inform the 'lessons learned' in the final section

Effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on rural communities in ACP countries : a reader

BOTO, Isolina
WESSELER, Gesa
BERKHOF, Irene Prins
Eds
2004

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This reader synthesises information from a number of sources on the impact of HIV on rural communities. It focuses the effects in the agricultural sector, and the implications of 'crusscutting issues' of gender and youth. It explores possible mitigation strategies, and information and communication strategies; and identifies 'urgent actions' which include improving the use of and access to ICT

The role of registers and databases in the protection of traditional knowledge : a comparative analysis

ALEXANDER, Merle
et al
January 2004

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This report seeks to help inform the debate regarding the potential and limitations of databases and registers for the protection traditional knowledge through the analysis of a number of case studies of existing registers established by indigenous peoples, states, non-governmental organisations and research institutes. Part I of the report discusses a number of underlying concepts regarding the nature of traditional knowledge; Part II presents case studies from Canada, India, Panama, Peru and Venezuela; Part III provides a comparative analysis of the case studies focusing on objectives, scope, procedures and benefits; Part IV considers the role of databases and registers in defensive and positive protection of traditional knowledge and their relationship to sui generis legal regimes, and the possibilities for interim protection of traditional knowledge through use of sui generis database laws and database trusts; and Part V sets down a number of conclusions and recommendations for further study

ICT and health [chapter] | ICT and MDGs : a World Bank Group perspective

WORLD BANK GROUP
December 2003

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This article explores the impact of ICTs on health care within developing countries. Topics covered include research and training of health-care workers, achieving health-related MDGs, and storing and disseminating health information. Details are also provided of selected World Bank-funded projects

Greenstone digital library software

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANISATION (UNESCO)
NEW ZEALAND DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECT(NZDL)
HUMAN INFO NGO
March 2003

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Greenstone is a suite of software for building and distributing digital library collections. It provides a new way of organising information and publishing it on the Internet or on CD-ROM. This CD-ROM contains the open source software as well as supporting documentation

Making information user-driven

LLOYD-LANEY, Megan
March 2003

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This brief document describes the issues and priorities involved in making information accessible. It explains that tailoring information to suit your audience increases the likelihood that your information will be accessed and taken up. To provide user-driven information it is important to understand who your target audience is, what information they want/need, how they access information and whether you are trying to inform or influence your audience. With this knowledge you can provide the information your target audience wants, in media they can use, and place your information where your audience will look for it. If you are clear about who has produced the information, who it is intended for and its purpose, the user can make informed decisions about the value of your information. Involving end users in research is also more likely to produce outputs that are quickly disseminated and taken up. Awareness of the strategic role of information within your organisation can be enhanced by encouraging all organisation members to become involved in identifying information needs, dissemination and community building

Resource centre manual : how to set up and manage a resource centre

O'SULLIVAN, Sheila
et al
2003

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Contains practical information on all aspects of setting up and managing a resource centre, from planning, fundraising and finding a suitable location, to collecting and organising materials, developing information services, and monitoring and evaluating the work of the resource centre. It assumes that most readers will use manual systems for organising information, but also explains how computers can be used in resource centres, including e-mail, Internet and databases. It describes how to select database software, and contains a detailed review of three leading database programs. It includes a list of organisations and publications that can provide further information

Disability in context

DELIN, Annie
2003

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This leaflet introduces the series Resource Disability Portfolio for libraries, archives and museums. It summarises the major aspects of the series. Although it is produced for the UK, it is also relevant for other countries

Training for equality

PLAYFORTH, Sarah
2003

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This brochure explains the major point of equality training for staff who work in museums and libraries. Although this brochure was produced for the UK it would also be very useful for people outside the UK

ICTs for development success stories : youth poverty gender

GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE PARTNERSHIP (GKP)
Ed
2003

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This publication highlights initiatives that are using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to make a real and meaningful difference in communities around the world. The aim is to share experiences and lessons learned to increase global understanding of how ICTs can be used to tackle poverty, injustice and inequalities. The stories were submitted to GKP under three broad categories: youth, poverty and gender. The best among them have been selected for the inaugural GKP Youth Award, the Tony Zeitoun Awards for poverty reduction, and the Gender and ICT Awards. The awards were presented at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in Geneva in December 2003

Are you listening : current practice in information, advice and advocacy services for older people

MARGIOTTA, Pat
et al
2003

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This study reports on a critical review of current practice in services designed to provide information, advice and advocacy for older people. The information is derived from a literature search, a search of the websites of local authority and major voluntary organisations, and three focus groups involving older people living in sheltered housing and elsewhere in the community. Examples of good practice are highlighted and some recommendations are made for future action

World oral health report 2003 : continuous improvement of oral health in the 21st century. The approach of the WHO Global Oral Health Programme

PETERSEN, Poul Erik
2003

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Chronic diseases and socio-environmental conditions are today's leading health problems. Rapidly changing diseases patterns are linked to changing lifestyles, which include diets rich in sugar, widespread use of tobacco and increased consumption of alcohol. In addition to socio-environmental conditions, oral health is highly related to the mentioned lifestyle factors which are common risks to most chronic diseases. Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems due to their high prevalence and incidence. As for all diseases the highest burden of oral diseases is on the disadvantaged and socially marginalised populations. Traditional treatment is extrememly costly and not feasible or possible to most low-income and middle-income countries. The WHO Global Strategy for the prevention and control of non-commincable diseases and the common risk factor approach is a new strategy to managing prevention and control of oral diseases. This document outlines the current oral health situation at the global level and the strategies and approaches for better oral health in the 21st century

Developing materials on HIV/AIDS/STIs for low-literate audiences

FAMILY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL (FHI)
PROGRAM FOR APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY AND HEALTH (PATH)
December 2002

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This manual provides a comprehensive methodology for developing materials for a low-literate audience in the context of a behaviour change communication program. It demonstrates the process of learning about target populations using qualitative research methodologies, developing effective messages with thir input, and crafting visual messages to support the overall HIV and AIDS program. Involving the target population and stakeholders in the development process is key to ensuring high-quality effective print materials. Finally, the guide outlines the process for rigorous pretesting to ensure that the information and issues are understood by the population groups that programs are trying to reach and influence. It can be adapted and used to develop audio-visual materials or materials for other target groups

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