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Expanding employment success for people with disabilities

FRUCHTERMAN, Jim
MELLEA, Joan
November 2018

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This report’s observations and recommendations were based on over fifty conversations with employers, technology vendors, disability experts—who were mainly people with disabilities, and technology experts, especially in artificial intelligence. It concentrates on human capital management (HCM) technology products used for attracting talent to companies, the actual interviewing/hiring process, and retention of employees once hired. Efforts on the market share leaders in each segment. 

Recommendations made concern:

  • Embracing artificial intelligence.
  • Boosting accessibility and accommodations.
  • Collecting and using data to inform action.
  • Guiding employers on the path from compliance to opportunity

Good for business. Promoting partnerships to employ people with disabilities

HUMANITY & INCLUSION
LEONARD CHESHIRE
April 2018

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NGOs like Humanity & Inclusion and Leonard Cheshire partner with the private sector to provide advice on employment practices to successfully transform the workplace and workforce to be disability inclusive. They support businesses in a number of ways including: 

  1. Provide a tailored approach, starting with an assessment
  2. Support inclusive recruitment processes
  3. Provide skills development for candidates
  4. Provide assessment and referral to support services
  5. Advise on constructing an accessible work environment
  6. Provide mentoring support

Case studies include HI's inclusive employment work in Morocco, Leonard Cheshire working in partnership with Accenture in South Asia, East Asia, and South Africa, with Henkel in the Philippines, with AnonTex in Bangladesh and with SUN ITES Consulting Private Ltd, Bangalore.

 

Top tips for global disability-inclusive employment are discussed.

Career guidance : a resource handbook for low- and middle-income countries

HANSEN, Ellen
2006

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This handbook provides information about career guidance in low and middle income countries. It is divided into two parts. Part I reviews current international trends in career guidance in high-income countries, comments on the relevance of these trends in low- and middle-income countries, and defines a framework of six key elements when developing a career guidance system. Part II indicates specific career guidance Internet web sites and resources. This resource is useful to policy makers, professionals, practitioners interested in career guidance in low and middle income countries

Organisational governance

BLACKMAN, Rachel
2006

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This resource is aimed primarily at Christian development organisations, but the principles and operational structures can be applied to other organisations. It focuses on organisational governance, the process of overseeing an organisation, looking in particular at how governing bodies should operate and lead an organisation. Section 1 analyses the role of the board and explains how its remit and responsibilities differ from those of the CEO. Section 2 reviews two key competencies, delegating authority and responsibility and developing policies. Section 3 looks at the main responsibilities of the board, including recruiting and supporting of the CEO; identifying mission, vision and values of the organisation; strategic planning; fulfilling legal requirements; identifying funding sources; and assessing progress. Section 4 looks in some detail at key operational aspects such as roles of board members, recruitment of new members and internal board policies. Section 5 suggests ways of making the board more effective, through the proper use of committees, agenda for meetings, chairing of board meetings, minute taking, sharing information, decision-making and board development

Job and work analysis : guidelines on identifying jobs for persons with disabilities

HERON, Robert
2005

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These guidelines provide information about job and work analysis to promote employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Practical steps and definitions are outlined in each topic-specific chapter. It is a useful document for employment services and service providers seeking to develop their capacity to promote the recruitment of persons with disabilities and the retention of workers who acquire a disability.
These guidelines form part of a series of ILO tools on placement services for disabled job seekers

Participation of African social scientists in malaria control : identifying enabling and constraining factors

NGALAME, Paulyne M
et al
December 2004

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This article discusses research examining the enabling and constraining factors that influence African social scientists' involvement in malaria control. Findings showed that most participants did not necessarily seek malaria as a career path. Having a mentor who provided research and training opportunities, and developing strong technical skills in malaria control and grant or proposal writing facilitated career opportunities in malaria. A paucity of jobs and funding and inadequate technical skills in malaria limited the type and number of opportunities available to social scientists in malaria control. Understanding the factors that influence job satisfaction, recruitment and retention in malaria control is necessary for better integration of social scientists into malaria control. However, given the wide array of skills that social scientists have and the variety of deadly diseases competing for attention in sub-Saharan Africa, it might be more cost effective to employ social scientists to work broadly on issues common to communicable diseases in general rather than solely on malaria

Global inclusion benchmark : an insight into corporate leadership on disability

EMPLOYERS' FORUM ON DISABILITY
October 2003

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This report provides an insight into corporate leadership on disability. It demonstrates that as disability moves up the corporate agenda, successful businesses are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of disabled people as key employees, customers, shareholders and stakeholders.
The benchmark examines how companies communicate their commitment to disabled people when they describe their impact on employees, customers, suppliers and the wider community. The report identifies ten key areas where companies should report on disability within their social reports

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