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Global humanitarian assistance report 2019

URQUHART, Angus
September 2019

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This report aims to reflect, respond to and inform efforts to improve the delivery of humanitarian assistance. This year's focus is on recurrent and protracted crises, to better understand how assistance is provided over the multiple years of a crisis. In the context of ever-more-complex and enduring crises and the increasing demand on limited resources, there is a pressing need to address the underlying causes of crises. The GHA Report therefore looks beyond humanitarian financing to examine other resource flows to countries in crisis, including developmental official development assistance (ODA less humanitarian assistance) and foreign direct investment, and the role they can and should play alongside humanitarian assistance to address crisis. 

Chapters of the report include: people, crisis and assistance; internation humanitarian assistance; wider crisis financing; effectiveness, efficiency and quality; and methodology and definitions. [Each chapter can be downloaded separately]

 

Associated datasets are also freely available

  • International humanitarian assistance provided by government donors, 2000–2018
  • International humanitarian assistance by recipient countries, 2000-2017

Fully accessible guide to flying with disabilities

2018

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A table is provided of the top 15 US airports giving notes on restrooms, pet relief areas, parking for people with disabilities and wheelchair services. Advantages of the use of specific credits cards by disabled people when travelling by plane in the USA are highlighted.

An intersection in population control: welfare reform and indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Australian northern territory

St GUILLAUME, Louise
THILL, Cate
2018

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In Australia, in the last decade, there have been significant policy changes to income support payments for people with a disability and Indigenous people. These policy reforms intersect in the experience of Indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Northern Territory who are subject to compulsory income management if classified as long-term welfare payment recipients. This intersection is overlooked in existing research and government policy. In this article, we apply intersectionality and Southern disability theory as frameworks to analyse how Indigenous people with a partial capacity to work (PCW) in the Northern Territory are governed under compulsory income management. Whilst the program is theoretically race and ability neutral, in practice it targets specific categories of people because it fails to address the structural and cultural barriers experienced by Indigenous people with a disability and reinscribes disabling and colonising technologies of population control.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1508-1530

Good Practices from the project : towards sustainable income generating activities for mine victim and other persons with disabilities in Cambodia

MUNOZ, Wanda
LAST, Ulrike
KIMSEAM, Teng
2010

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This report shares practices and tools that support the equal access and inclusion of persons with disabilities to livelihood services by exercising their social and economic rights and potential. Based upon experiences of a project in Cambodia, the document is divided into the following three sections: the project context; the methodology, tools and practices of the individual support provided to persons with disabilities and mine victims; and cross-cutting issues, such awareness raising, gender approach and partnerships. This report would be useful for disabled people organizations (DPO), government offices and representatives, local, national and international organizations and cooperation agencies

Good practices for the economic inclusion of people with disabilities in developing countries : funding mechanisms for self-employment

Handicap International
Ed
August 2006

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This report aims to highlight good practices, strategies, tools and operational methods that guarantee the sustainability of projects that support access to funding mechanisms and the self-employment of people with disabilities. More specifically, the study focuses on the use of microcredit enterprises and grants for the start-up and expansion of microenterprises. Developed in partnership with a diverse range of organisations of/for people with disabilities and microfinance providers, the report highlights the significant exclusion of people with diabilities from mainstream microfinance institutions and subsequently presents two solutions: firstly to develop schemes that promote the inclusion of people with disabilites; secondly to develop financial services by organisations of/for people with disabilities themselves. This report would be of relevance to anybody working in the fields of international development, disability or microfinance

The paradigm of communication in development : from knowledge transfer to community participation : lessons from the Grameen Bank, Bangladesh

FUGELSANG, A
CHANDLER, D
1997

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This case study describes in some detail the communication methodologies in a cooperative bank in Bangladesh, which relies on the participation of landless people. The paper describes and analyzes the bank's approach to external and internal communication and information processing, its methods of information, management and decision-making - features of the Bank's organization and functioning which have played a significant role in its success

Voices of the poor : poverty and social capital in Tanzania

NARAYAN, Deepa
1997

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This study explores the usage of participatory methods for policy research by comparing and contrasting these findings with those from more conventional household consumption and expenditure surveys. It shows how using these measures leads to different conclusions about the causes and nature of poverty. The study goes on to discuss the concept of social capital at the local level, providing quantifiable evidence that village-level social capital (defined as membership in groups with particular characteristics) significantly affects household welfare

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