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Guidance on an integrated approach to victim assistance: By states for states

CONVENTIONS ON CLUSTER MUNITIONS COORDINATORS
2016

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Realizing the rights, and addressing the needs of victims of cluster munitions, landmines, and other explosive remnants of war (ERW), requires a long-term commitment that should continue well after clearance work has been completed.

This Guidance was developed in a participatory manner through tailored questionnaires, a workshop, and an online platform with contributions from a total of 30 states, as well as from representatives of survivors’ organisations and a range of international and civil society organisations. With assistance from Handicap International, from the feedback received, the Convention on Cluster Munitions Coordinators selected a range of good practices and national examples of effective implementation. These have been identified at three levels: legislation, policies and plans; ensuring equitable and equal access to services and resources; and measuring progress.

In recognition of the fact that affected States and donor States face different challenges in implementing an integrated approach, the Guidance is divided into two parts – the first part addresses the practices of affected States, and the second those of donor States. Each part is further divided into two main sub-sections dealing with the dual imperatives of an integrated approach: ensuring that specific victim assistance efforts act as a catalyst for inclusion; and ensuring that broader efforts contribute to the realization of victim assistance obligations. Each sub-section highlights relevant provisions, challenges, good practices, and national examples for each of the three levels

Guidance on victim assistance reporting

2016

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In addition to a brief overview of victim assistance in the context of international humanitarian and human rights law, the Guidance on Victim Assistance Reporting is presented in two main parts: an overview of reporting obligations under the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, the CCM, and Protocol V to the CCW, and available guidance on these obligations; and, the introduction of a consistent approach to comprehensive victim assistance reporting. To support this approach, the Guidance on Victim Assistance Reporting includes in its Annexes a detailed questionnaire which is intended to provide guidance to States on the collection of relevant information to enhance their reporting, and sample reports using the questionnaire as a guide.

The Guidance was developed in consultation with key stakeholders, including members of the Victim Assistance Committee, victim assistance coordinators for the CCM and Protocol V to the CCW, as well as relevant United Nations and other international agencies, NGOs and disability actors

Disability and armed conflict: A quest for Africanising disability in Uganda

BUSINGE, Patrick
2016

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There are three key revelations from literature on disability and armed conflict in the Global South. First, though disability is a relative term, models from the Global North are widely used irrespective of indigenous knowledges and contexts. Second, though disability is caused by colonial and post-colonial inequalities such as poverty, disabled people are often forgotten in poverty reduction programmes. Third, while many countries experience armed conflict, little is known about its effects on disabled people living in contexts of armed conflict. This realisation led to the aims of this study which were to: i) investigate how disability is understood in the armed conflict setting of Uganda; ii) to understand the experiences of disabled people in armed conflict settings; and iii) examine ways of improving the experience of disabled people in the Global South. Using a critical, constructivist and grounded research methodology, the study revealed the nature of ‘African disabilities’ and the challenges faced by disabled people living in conflict settings: displacement, dehumanisation, rampant poverty and neo-colonialism. Disabled people experience rejection in their communities and invisibility in the provision of services. Using literature as a dialogue partner, this study concludes that the ways in which disabled people are treated runs counter to many African beliefs on what it means to be human and live in a community. Consequently, it proposes a theory which contains critical knowledge on how the Africanisation of disability could be thought of and brought about in conflict settings.

 

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2016, Vol. 3 No. 1

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2016, Vol. 3 No. 1

2016

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Articles include:

  • Disability and armed conflict: A quest for Africanising disability in Uganda
  • Disadvantage and disability: Experiences of people from refugee backgrounds with disability living in Australia
  • Tangible First Steps: Inclusion Committees as a Strategy to Create Inclusive Schools in Western Kenya
  • The Re-covering Self: a critique of the recovery-based approach in India’s mental health care
  • To what extent is Universal Design for Learning “universal”? A case study in township special needs schools in South Africa
  • Una Vida Sin Palabras?: Disability, Subalternity and the Sandinista Revolution

Disability inclusion : topic guide

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
November 2015

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This topic guide summarises evidence on the key debates and challenges of disability inclusion in development and humanitarian response. Disability does not necessary imply limited wellbeing and poverty. Yet there is growing evidence that the estimated one billion people with disabilities face attitudinal, physical and institutional barriers that result in multi-dimensional poverty, exclusion and marginalisation. Disability inclusion could increase earnings, tax revenues, and individual and societal wellbeing. It need not be costly or complicated. Inclusive approaches are more cost-effective than piecemeal disability interventions. GSDRC Topic Guides aim to provide a clear, concise and objective report on findings from rigorous research on critical areas of development policy. Their purpose is to inform policymakers and practitioners of the key debates and evidence on the topic of focus, to support informed decision-making

Available in both pdf and online versions

Thematic study on the rights of persons with disabilities under article 11 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, on situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies

OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (UN OHCHR)
November 2015

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This study sets out the standards concerning the human rights of persons with disabilities in situations of risk and humanitarian emergencies, and presents a harmonized understanding of existing international humanitarian law under article 11 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The aim of the study is to clarify the scope of the Convention in the context of ongoing global discussion relating to disasters and humanitarian emergencies, to identify good practices, and to make recommendations

Injuries, death, and disability associated with 11 years of conflict in Baghdad, Iraq : a randomized household cluster survey

LAFTA, Riyadh
et al
August 2015

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“The objective of this study was to characterize injuries, deaths, and disabilities arising during 11 years of conflict in Baghdad.” The quantitative study shows the methodology used in the collection of data, the findings discovered through evaluation of the data gathered, and interpretation of how to best use those findings to serve specific populations”

 

 PLOS ONE, 10(8)

Disability in humanitarian context : views from affected people and field organisations

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
July 2015

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This report is based on the results of a global consultation carried out in 2015 as a contribution to the World Humanitarian Summit and is intended to better identify the changes needed for a disability inclusive humanitarian response. A total of 769 responses were collected through 3 online surveys targeting persons with disabilities, disabled people's organisations (DPOs) and humanitarian actors. The results demonstrate that while most humanitarian actors pledge to target vulnerable persons in crisis time, few of them are putting in place specific mechanisms and procedures to effectively reach to, and taking into account, persons with disabilities in their programmes. Addressing these challenges is a human right imperative and has also to do with an effective implementation of principled humanitarian aid. This ambition requires changes in policies and practices within the humanitarian community as a whole

A systematic literature review of the quality of evidence for injury and rehabilitation interventions in humanitarian crises

SMITH, James
ROBERTS, Bayard
KNIGHT, Abigail
GOSSELIN, Richard
BLANCHET, Karl
July 2015

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Introduction: Humanitarian crises continue to pose a significant threat to health; the United Nations estimates that 144 million people are directly affected by conflict or environmental disasters. During most humanitarian crises, surgical and rehabilitative interventions remain a priority.

 

Objectives: This review assessed the quality of evidence that informs injury and physical rehabilitation interventions in humanitarian crises.

 

Methods: Peer-reviewed and grey literature sources were assessed in a systematic manner. Selected papers were evaluated using quality criteria based on a modified version of the STROBE protocol.

 

Results: 46 papers met the inclusion criteria. 63 % of the papers referred to situations of armed conflict, of which the Yugoslav Wars were the most studied crisis context. 59 % of the studies were published since the year 2000. However, only two studies were considered of a high quality.

 

Conclusions: While there is now a greater emphasis on research in this sector, the volume of evidence remains inadequate given the growing number of humanitarian programmes worldwide. Further research is needed to ensure a greater breadth and depth of understanding of the most appropriate interventions in different settings.

 

International Journal of Public Health, Vol 60

State of the world’s emergencies : a briefing for new UK parliamentarians

BOND HUMANITARIAN GROUP
BOND CONFLICT POLICY GROUP
July 2015

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“The briefing is designed to give incoming members of parliament a rapid overview of some of the world’s most fragile situations and highlight actions which key influencers can take to ensure the UK government most effectively delivers on its moral and political responsibilities. Beginning with summaries of key issues we face as agencies working in humanitarian crisis and conflict settings, the briefing then focuses on short summaries of 10 fragile situations and emergencies”

Note: the information is accurate to the middle of April 2015

The use of explosive weapons in Syria : a time bomb in the making. Analysis of weapons contamination in Syria.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
May 2015

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Details are given of the use of explosive weapons in Syria since 2011 and its effects on the population highlighted. The density of explosive weapons use (2013 - 2015) in Syria is mapped and the numbers of affected population by Syrian governorate are provided. Between December 2012 and March 2015, 77,645 incidents were recorded following conventional weapons and IEDs use in Syria. Explosive weapons represent 83.73% of recorded incidents and the distribution of type of weapons use per rural and urban areas is given. The higher risk of developing permanent impairments by people injured by explosive weapons and the long-term impact of explosive remnants of war on services and infrastructure are highlighted.

"I see that it is possible": Building capacity for disability inclusion in gender-based violence programming in humanitarian settings

Women's Refugee Commission
International Rescue Committee
May 2015

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While humanitarian organizations are increasingly recognizing women and girls with disabilities in policies and guidelines, there are still significant gaps in operationalizing this. Their needs and capacities are often under-represented in gender, protection and disability forums. Furthermore, organizations of women with disabilities, which can play a critical role in bridging the development/humanitarian divide, are not meaningfully included in humanitarian coordination and decision-making.

This report documents findings and recommendations from a participatory action research project on disability inclusion in GBV programming in humanitarian settings, conducted with communities affected by crisis and conflict.

This toolkit was created with the input and participation of persons with disabilities, as well as GBV practitioners,
over the course of the project. It is intended to support GBV staff to build disability inclusion into their work, and
to strengthen the capacity of GBV practitioners to use a survivor-centered approach when providing services to
survivors with disabilities. The tools are designed to complement existing guidelines, protocols and tools for GBV
prevention and response, and should not be used in isolation from these. GBV practitioners are encouraged to
adapt the tools to their individual programs and contexts, and to integrate pieces into standard GBV tools and
resources.

Responding to the Syrian health crisis : the need for data and research

COUTTS, Adam
et al
March 2015

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This article assesses the impact of the war in Syrian the context of the health system and neighbouring countries and the rise in non-communicable diseases. The authors advocate that  urgent policy and research attention needs to be given to the generation of timely and high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of the humanitarian health response, the capacity of health systems within Syria, and the issue of non-communicable diseases among internally displaced people and refugees

The Lancet, Vol 3, Issue 3, PE8-E9, Mar 01, 2015

 

 

Humanitarian response : how to include everyone?

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents key information about the inclusion of persons with disabilities and most vulnerable people in humanitarian response. It highlights key facts and issues during humanitarian emergencies such as lack of access, gaps and legal policy and frameworks. It outlines practical steps can be taken by humanitarian actors at different levels and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

Disability under occupation : at the congruence between conflict, religion, & society in Palestine

RASHID, Omar
January 2015

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A dissertation on the Palestinian experience of disability under Israeli territorial occupation. The following key research questions were considered under this dissertation. "First, to locate the perceptions of disability among the disabled in the occupied territories of Palestine, in light of their religious affiliation. Second, to investigate the realities of the disabled within Palestine; and third, to enquire as to whether there had been any differences in the perceptions of disabilities and the realities of those who were injured in conflict, and those who were born with impairment" These questions were answered through a hybrid-methods system of research, with a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods being used

 

Dissertation submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Birmingham

The user has given permission for the original dissertation document to be uploaded to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Minimum standards for age and disability inclusion in humanitarian action : pilot version

AGE AND DISABILITY CONSORTIUM
2015

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This pilot version of the Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action has “been developed for use by all practitioners involved in humanitarian response, including staff and volunteers of local, national, and international humanitarian agencies, with the expectation that the inclusion of people with disabilities and older people is feasible at every stage of the response and in every sector and context. The Standards are intended to inform the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian programmes; to strengthen accountability to people with disabilities and older people; and to support advocacy, capacity-building and preparedness measures on age and disability across the humanitarian system

 

The Standards are drawn from a wide-ranging review of existing guidance and standards developed by humanitarian actors over recent years. This includes material from organisations with a special focus on disability and/or older age, together with key documents, including the Sphere Handbook, the Sphere Companion Standards and the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS). The Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion do not create entirely new demands on humanitarian actors; rather, they clarify and reinforce what is already required if broader standards of impartial humanitarian programming and the principles of the Humanitarian Charter are to be upheld”

Guidelines for integrating gender-based violence interventions in humanitarian action: Reducing risk, promoting resilience and aiding recovery

WARD, Jean
LAFRENIERE, Julie
et al
2015

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The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist humanitarian actors and communities affected by armed conflict, natural disasters and other humanitarian emergencies to coordinate, plan, implement, monitor and evaluate essential actions for the prevention and mitigation of gender-based violence (GBV) across all sectors of humanitarian response. Part One presents an overview of GBV, provides an explanation for why GBV is a protection concern for all humanitarian actors and outlines recommendations for ensuring implementation of the Guidelines. Part Two provides a background to the ‘thematic areas’ in Part Three. It also introduces the guiding principles and approaches that are the foundation for all planning and implementation of GBV-related programming. Part Three constitutes the bulk of these Guidelines. It provides specific guidance, organized into thirteen thematic area sections: camp coordination and camp management; child protection; education; food security and agriculture; health; housing, land and property; humanitarian mine action; livelihoods; nutrition; protection; shelter, settlement and recovery; water, sanitation and hygiene; humanitarian operations support sectors. The importance of cross-sectoral coordination is highlighted in each section. It is also recommended that sector actors review the content of all thematic area sections. The Guidelines draw from many tools, standards, background materials and other resources developed by the United Nations, national and international non-governmental organizations, and academic sources. In each thematic area there is a list of resources specific to that area, and additional GBV-related resources are provided in Annex 1. The importance of indicators being disaggregated by sex, age, disability and other vulnerability factors is highlighted throughout.

Disability and displacement in times of conflict: Rethinking migration, flows and boundaries

BERGHS, Maria
2015

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In this paper, I try to understand the changed relationship of conflict to migration as seen through a lens of fluidity and what that entails for disabled people - particularly what boundaries and borders are at stake. Secondly, I investigate migration through the idea of ‘ontological insecurity’ and try and link this to ideas of (dis)/ableism. Then, I attend to what happens when boundaries are enforced in the humanitarianism of a refugee camp, to explain how territoriality of such a setting unmakes people into ‘strangers’. I show how the structural violence of poverty leads to a necessary fluidity and illustrate how people use this to combat the ‘unmaking’ of the self and reinsert themselves back into social life and relationships. Lastly, I examine the place of biolegal politics in medical humanitarianism and explore the relationship to ‘necropolitics’ and its consequences.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 1

Equal basis 2014 : access and rights in 33 countries

BURKE, Megan
PERSI VICENTIC, Loren
December 2014

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This report presents research about efforts to meet the needs and uphold the rights of persons with disabilities in four thematic areas: health care, rehabilitation, work and employment, and accessibility and enabling environments. Research findings are drawn from the experiences of landmine and cluster munition survivors and other persons with similar needs in 33 countries experiencing armed conflict or emerging from armed conflict or political or economic transition. Findings are placed within the context of relevant articles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the World Report on Disability

Including people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts

OOSTERHOFF, Pauline
KETT, Maria
November 2014

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This issue focuses on the inclusion of people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts and concludes that “more must be done to ensure the needs and rights of people with disabilities are fully recognised in disaster risk reduction and emergency responses. Accelerating progress will require inclusive humanitarian programming and the use of technological solutions to be effectively promoted and incentivised, and people with disabilities and their organisations to be involved from the outset in the design and implementation of policies and programmes”

IDS Rapid Response Briefing 8

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