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Empowering practice

WEETMAN, Robert
October 2010

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"(T)his book was originally written to accompany a training course for people involved in support work. It's directed at people with the imagination and creativity to recognise that 'how we've always done things around here' isn't a good guide to good practice...The book looks in detail about what can go wrong...about how support can be disempowering...The book goes on to discuss alternative ways of working. It takes a look at what overall aims may be appropriate in support work; how different service design might help; what capacity thinking is; and it presents some ideas on how to work in an empowering way"
Version 2b

Educator development and support

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
March 2008

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Limited attention has been given to helping educators to deal with the new challenges posed by the epidemic. Even less attention has been given to protecting educators from HIV infection and to providing care, treatment and support for educators infected with or affected by HIV and AIDS. There are also very few programmes addressing the needs of other education sector personnel, such as planners, managers and support staff. This booklet looks at educator development and support; educator conduct; and prevention, care, treatment and support of infected and affected eduators

The medical peace work textbook

ROWSON, M
MELF, K
Eds
2008

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This textbook provides an introduction to medical peace work and includes chapters relating to human rights; the causes and health effects of war and violent conflict; how health workers can promote peace-building and reconstruction; and the health and well-being needs of refugees and immigrants. The book is aimed at doctors, nurses, public health workers and other health professionals, and students. This e-textbook is part of an online course on Medical Peace Work. The book can be consulted, downloaded, or printed for free without registering for the course

HIV & AIDS and supportive learning environments

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
2008

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This booklet addresses the following issues for learners: - Rights and access to education - Protection - Knowledge, attitudes and skills - Care and support Schools and other educational settings play an important role in educating young people about HIV and AIDS, developing the skills they need to protect themselves from HIV infection, tackling fear, stigma and discrimination and promoting care and support of those who are infected with and affected by HIV and AIDS

The essentials of antiretroviral therapy for health care and program managers

HOPE, Ruth
ISRAEL, Ellen
April 2007

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This book provides health care workers and mangers with information and practical guidance relating to antiretroviral therapies (ART). It also considers wider care and treatment issues such as; opportunistic infections, the integration of ART with antenatal and midwifery services, the particular needs of children and young people, support relating to nutrition, spiritual needs, psycho-social and economic issues. In addition, the need for community level support to help with adherence to treatment and address stigma and discrimination are also considered, as is end-of-life care for people whose disease does not respond to treatment

Civil society perspectives on TB policy in Bangladesh, Brazil, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Thailand

Public Health Watch, Open Society Institute
2006

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This publication contains an overview of the common themes and funding resulting from five country reports, and the five reports themselves. The World Health Organization has designated all five as TB-high burden countries. The research findings show a low level of awareness about TB, and TB and HIV co-infection; about how TB is transmitted and how it can be cured; and about the link between poverty and TB; as well as low media coverage of TB and a lack of strong communication strategies for national TB programmes. It also contains country-specific recommendations

Promoting young people's sexual and reproductive health : dynamic contextual analysis

CHALMERS, Helen
et al
January 2006

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This resource offers a new approach to understanding and developing work to meet the sexual and reproductive health needs of young people. After setting out the key principles which inform a Dynamic Contextual Analysis, the guide outlines the three main steps in carrying out such an assessment of needs and opportunities. Policy-makers, practitioners and researchers working to promote young people's sexual health in resource-constrained settings will find this resource particularly useful

2006 report on the global AIDS epidemic

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2006

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This annual report takes an overall look at the global AIDS epidemic. Provides an impact analysis of AIDS on populations at risk and civil society. Looks at effective ways to prevent, control and treat the disease. Indicates how to improve allocation and use of financial resources, design and implement effective national policies and approach the response from a strategic perspective rather than in terms of crisis management. Annexes include country profiles, essential statistics and country progress indicators

Expanding access to HIV treatment through community-based organisations

SIDACTION
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
July 2005

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This UNAIDS Best Practice Collection document aims to highlight and advocate for the work of civil society, community based organisations in particular, in responding to the AIDS epidemic in Africa. The paper describes a ground breaking survey by Sidaction, a Paris based treatment rights group, which supports community responses to AIDS in low and middle income countries. In 2004, Sidaction, in cooperation with the UNAIDS secretariat and WHO mapped treatment and care efforts by community based organisations in Africa. Many community based organisations are already dispensing ARVs on a significant scale. The survey confirmed that community efforts to provide treatment represent an important opportunity to enrol more people in antiretroviral therapy. To seize this opportunity, national governments and the international community need to quickly provide support to expand the coverage and impact of community based treatment. The aim is for CBOs to work closely with the public sector so that each reinforces the efforts of the other

Progress on global access to HIV antiretroviral therapy : an update on "3 x 5"

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
June 2005

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WHO and UNAIDS launched a strategy for ensuring treatment for 3 million people living with HIV and AIDS in low and middle income countries by the end of 2005 - the "3 x 5" target. Since late 2003, coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has more than doubled from 400,000 to approximately 1 million receiving treatment by the end of June 2005. 14 of these countries are providing ART to at least 50% of those who need it, consistent with the 3 x 5 target. This interim report highlights progress made to date and the major obstacles that remain to the rapid scale up of HIV treatment. It looks primarily at the reasons for the successes and failures of scaling up HIV/AIDS interventions in different settings. The report also makes recommendations concerning the approaches needed to overcome bottlenecks as well as the need for sustainable financing mechanisms and greater harmonisation of effort by technical and financing partners at country level

Guidelines for establishing community-led antiretroviral treatment through a human capacity development approach

SALVATION ARMY
April 2005

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These guidelines for delivering anti-retroviral therapy in communities describe a set of principles, based on the Salvation Army's belief that an effective response to HIV relies on a combination of drug treatment administration and human capacity development. A number of agents can be involved in the successful delivery of antiretroviral treatment, and these include patients, families, neighbourhood, religious congregations and clinics. An integrated approach, engaging with all members of the community and committed to the development of human capacity, would ensure equitable access to treatment, support for all people affected by the disease and higher levels of adherence

Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy

MACHTINGER, Edward L
BANGSBERG, David R
2005

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This "chapter" of the HIV InSite website provides a technical overview of key issues concerning adherence to ARV treatment including global rates of ARV adherence, implications of adherence, predictors and measuring adherence and interventions to promote adherence. While the emphasis is not on developing countries, one section on adherence in resource poor countries is of interest. It says that recent data suggests that even without dedicated adherence programmes, patients in resource poor settings have levels of adherence and virological suppression that are equivalent to, or possibly better than those seen in resource-rich settings. According to their data, financial barriers have been the only consistent predictor of incomplete adherence in resource limited settings

Antiretroviral therapy in primary health care : experience of the Chiradzulu programme in Malawi. Case study

MEDECINS SANS FRONTIERES (MSF) MALAWI
July 2004

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The Chiradzulu programme is one of MSF's largest. MSF currently provides HAART to more than 13,000 patients in 56 projects spread across 25 countries. These programmes provide a continuum of care, including prevention efforts (health education, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV), voluntary counselling and testing, prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections, HAART and nutritional and psychosocial support. Although the Chiradzulu project is still evolving, and treatment systems and point of care continue to be modified, the project has already shown that when treatment is adapted to local conditions and is supported by human and financial resources, rural health systems can effectively provide comprehensive HIV/AIDS care

Analysis of aid in support of HIV/AIDS control, 2000-2002

DAC
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
June 2004

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This report is a review of statistical data on aid to HIV/AIDS control. It was compiled by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Secretariat in collaboration with the members of the DAC Working Party on Statistics (WP-STAT) and UNAIDS between February and May 2004. The key findings are presented concerning total official development assistance commitments for HIV/AIDS control, and bilateral aid. It also includes contributions to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The report notes that larger donors especially multilaterals are the main funders of treatment programmes, which require substantial funding and long term commitments. Smaller donors tend to concentrate on HIV prevention, but also support home-based care and social mitigation activities

The Senegalese antiretroviral drug access initiative : an economic, social, behavioural and biomedical analysis

DESCLAUX, Alice
et al
April 2004

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This very thorough analysis of the Senegalese Antiretroviral Drug Access Initiative (ISAARV) presents preliminary results from the initiative's first three years. The analysis explores four aspects of the programme: treatment access, adherence, therapeutic efficacy, and the impact of this treatment programme on the Senegalese health care system

Moving forward : a report on pioneering responses to children affected by HIV/AIDS in Andhra Pradesh, India

VASAVYA MAHILA MANDALI (VMM)
March 2004

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Since 2000, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and its country office in India has worked in three states in India to establish and support three Lead Partners, including Vasavya Mahila Mandali (VMM), and 37 implementing NGOs to carry out a pioneering programme of home and community-based care and support for children affected by HIV/AIDS and their families. In this report, VMM draws on its work to identify gaps in existing services and propose effective initiatives, policies and examples of good practice for dealing with the issues that children face when they are affected by HIV/AIDS

Nonconsensual sex among youth

FINGER, William
et al
March 2004

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Reproductive health and HIV prevention programmes for youth rarely look at the reallity of coercive sex that so many youth face. Coercive sex is a violation of a person's rights and can have severe mental, physical and reproductive health consequences, including pregnancy and HIV and other STIs. This paper highlights a number of key issues: the range of sexual coercion faced by youth; the impact of gender norms on coercion; the consequences of coercion; and programme approaches to reduce the problem

Empowered to differ : stakeholders' influences in community-based rehabilitation

FINKENFLÜGEL, Harry
2004

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'Empowered to differ' equally addresses researchers and CBR professionals. The book gives an overview about the developments in the field of community-based rehabilitation since 1978, using the examples of CBR projects in Southern Africa. Finkenflügel asks for the knowledge and the evidence for CBR and to what extent the roles, interests and powers of stakeholders can contribute to this knowledge and evidence

World health report 2004 : changing history

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2004

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This report argues that a comprehensive HIV/AIDS strategy linking prevention, treatment, care and support for people living with the virus could save the lives of millions of people in poor and middle-income countries. At present, almost six million people in developing countries need treatment, but only about 400 000 of them received it in 2003. The World Health Report 2004 argues that a treatment gap of such dimensions is indefensible and that narrowing it is both an ethical obligation and a public health necessity. In September 2003 WHO, UNAIDS and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and their partners launched an effort to provide three million people in developing countries with antiretroviral therapy (ART) by end 2005 - the 3 by 5 initiative. This World Health Report shows how a partnership linking international organizations, national governments, the private sector and communities is working simultaneously to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment, reinforce HIV prevention and strengthen health systems in some of the countries where they are currently weakest

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