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An integrated approach to victim assistance in Cambodia & the role of Australia as supporting state

De BEAUPUIS, Gaetan
HOTTENOT, Elke
November 2018

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The objective of this case study was to review how Cambodia, as an affected state, and Australia as a donor, promote the provision of victim assistance in sectors including health, rehabilitation, disability, socio-economic development and poverty reduction. It documents promising practices and proposes next steps to ensure the sustainability of victim assistance provision in the near and long-term future. This study aims to inspire the mine action community in both affected and donor states to increase its contribution to victim assistance. This case study focuses on both prongs of the integrated approach to victim assistance by describing: i) Broader multi-sector efforts that reach casualties, survivors and indirect victims; and ii) Specific victim assistance efforts to improve victims’ quality of life deployed by mine action stakeholders, other actors in charge of coordinating victim assistance in Cambodia, and Australia as a donor state. An analysis of these specific efforts revealed that they fall into one of two of the following categories: a) Bridging gaps in data collection and service provision, or b) Advocating for, and facilitating, a multisector response.

 

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) and the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority (CMAA) conducted the study in November 2017 in seven provinces. The methodology comprised three steps: a desk review of project documents, national plans and policies from a range of sectors with a focus on programmes funded by Australia; interviews with key personnel from the mine action and the disability sectors; and a field survey comprising 31 individual indepth interviews with 19 survivors and 12 other persons with disabilities (23 male and 8 female), 12 focus group discussions as well as field visits to observe the initiatives described in this publication. 

 

 

Intellectual property rights and access to ARV medicines : civil society resistance in the global south|Brazil, Colombia, China, India, Thailand

REIS, Renata
TERTO, Veriano Jr
PIMENTA, Maria Cristina Pimenta
Eds
2009

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This book looks at "...the recent history and the many struggles related to advocacy for access to [antiretroviral] medicines of engaged civil society. Through the experiences of five middle-income countries - Brazil, China, Colombia, India, and Thailand." It presents "...the perspective of local civil society organisations about the national impact of intellectual property protection and access to medications. "These five countries were chosen due to their accumulated experience in this field, their capacity to produce generic medication, their activist efforts, and the exchange of ideas and information that already exists between them"

The medical peace work textbook

ROWSON, M
MELF, K
Eds
2008

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This textbook provides an introduction to medical peace work and includes chapters relating to human rights; the causes and health effects of war and violent conflict; how health workers can promote peace-building and reconstruction; and the health and well-being needs of refugees and immigrants. The book is aimed at doctors, nurses, public health workers and other health professionals, and students. This e-textbook is part of an online course on Medical Peace Work. The book can be consulted, downloaded, or printed for free without registering for the course

Behind the pandemic : uncovering the links between social inequity and HIV/AIDS

DE PAUW, Lia
2007

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This is an education toolkit which takes an exploratory and participatory approach to helping improve people's understanding about international HIV and AIDS issues and the links between HIV and AIDS and social inequity and poverty. There are three modules: Background and Basics, a Global HIV Pandemic Simulation, and Moving Into Action: Stopping the Pandemic. It also contains an extensive information section and instructions for leading the sessions

UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention : towards universal access

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2007

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These practical guidelines are designed to help policy makers and planners to create an effective national response to HIV prevention, by ensuring that their response matches the epidemic dynamics and social context within their country and the populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. The guidelines encourage countries to know the national and local epidemiological scenarios and their current response; to match and prioritise their response; to set ambitious, realistic and measurable prevention targets; to tailor prevention plans to local epidemic scenarios and to use and analyse strategic information

Neglected diseases : a human rights analysis

HUNT, Paul
et al
2007

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This report introduces and explores some of the connections between neglected tropical diseases (those affecting people living in developing countries, particularly in rural areas) and human rights with a view to urging all parties concerned to work collaboratively in identifying the practical implications of applying human rights to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies, programmes and projects for neglected diseases

Violence and abuse against women with disabilities in Malawi

HOEM KVAM, Marit
HELLUM BRAATHEN, Stine
November 2006

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This is a case study of violence and sexual abuse towards women with disabilities in Malawi. It is based on in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. This work examines the childhood and adult experiences of these women, and asserts that discrimination, stigma and vulnerability is worse for adult women.It claims that improvements to access and education will lead to empowerment, thus improving the overall quality of life that women with disabilities can enjoy. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in human/ women's rights and disability

World report on violence against children

PINHEIRO, Paulo Sergio
August 2006

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This book presents "the outcome of the first comprehensive global attempt to describe the scale of all forms of violence against children and its impact. Violence is a problem that calls for a multisectoral response. This report approaches the issue from the combined perspectives of human rights, public health and child protection. This report asserts that no violence against children is justifiable and all forms of violence are preventable. The commitments made at international and national levels and the accumulated knowledge described in this report give us the necessary tools to protect children from violence, to prevent it from happening in the first place, and to mitigate the consequences"
Note: the report is available in individual pdf files from the link above

HIV and AIDS treatment education : a critical component of efforts to ensure universal access to prevention, treatment and care

UNAIDS INTER AGENCY TASK TEAM (IATT) ON EDUCATION
June 2006

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The expansion of access to ART is significantly improving the lives of people living with HIV and the wellbeing of communities affected by the epidemic. However, stigmatization and discrimination and poor adherence threaten to weaken the full potential of drug treatment and medical care. This paper looks at the contribution that treatment education can make to maximise the impact of greater ART accessibility and improved care provision. It takes a wide-ranging approach to education, which should include treatment literacy, advocacy and community mobilisation. It takes the view that treatment preparedness can only be achieved through the full involvement of people living with HIV/AIDS. An effective strategy will also rely on inter-sectoral collaboration between governments, the education sector, civil society and development organizations. It argues that the success of interventions will depend on their gender-responsiveness, and in their ability to adopt participatory and interactive methods, targeting different groups and settings in a culturally sensitive manner

Monitoring financial flows for health research 2006 : the changing landscape of health research for development

MATLIN, Stephen
DE FRANCISCO, Andres
Eds
2006

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This study aims to provide NGOs and decision-makers with an overview of currently available information on resource flows into health research. It paints the picture of a changing landscape, with an increased number of actors and increases in resources for health promotion and health research in developing countries. The document provides statistical data on global spending on R&D for health, looks at trends and patterns of morbidity and mortality and discusses health research challenges and priorities for the public sector

Civil society perspectives on TB policy in Bangladesh, Brazil, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Thailand

Public Health Watch, Open Society Institute
2006

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This publication contains an overview of the common themes and funding resulting from five country reports, and the five reports themselves. The World Health Organization has designated all five as TB-high burden countries. The research findings show a low level of awareness about TB, and TB and HIV co-infection; about how TB is transmitted and how it can be cured; and about the link between poverty and TB; as well as low media coverage of TB and a lack of strong communication strategies for national TB programmes. It also contains country-specific recommendations

Globalisation and privatisation : the impact on childcare policy and practice

VANDENBROECK, Michel
January 2006

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This paper explores the impact of globalisation and neo-liberalism policies on child care provision, with a special focus on Belgium. It provides an overview of the historical context, and shows how even in Belgium social democratic welfare state globalisation has stimulated privatisation and decentralisation of services, and forced parents to take direct responsibility for the care of their children. The paper suggests that policy makers need to balance competing demands: government responsibility versus autonomy; standardisation versus diversity; inclusion versus exclusion

Expanding access to HIV treatment through community-based organisations

SIDACTION
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
July 2005

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This UNAIDS Best Practice Collection document aims to highlight and advocate for the work of civil society, community based organisations in particular, in responding to the AIDS epidemic in Africa. The paper describes a ground breaking survey by Sidaction, a Paris based treatment rights group, which supports community responses to AIDS in low and middle income countries. In 2004, Sidaction, in cooperation with the UNAIDS secretariat and WHO mapped treatment and care efforts by community based organisations in Africa. Many community based organisations are already dispensing ARVs on a significant scale. The survey confirmed that community efforts to provide treatment represent an important opportunity to enrol more people in antiretroviral therapy. To seize this opportunity, national governments and the international community need to quickly provide support to expand the coverage and impact of community based treatment. The aim is for CBOs to work closely with the public sector so that each reinforces the efforts of the other

What do we do with culture? Engaging culture in development

VINCENT, Robin
March 2005

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This short briefing paper gives a critical overview of recent attempts to engage culture in development work, and in HIV and AIDS work in particular. It also outlines a range of insights from anthropological work that relate to understanding and addressing culture in development. Areas covered include moving beyond a focus on the individual in analysis of change, looking beyond the local setting only, considering the role of the organisational culture of development institutions, valuing indigenous knowledge, and looking at the way mobilising culture and cultural resources is intimately linked to power relations

Our common interest : report of the Commission for Africa

COMMISSION FOR AFRICA
March 2005

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This wide-ranging report was produced by the Commission For Africa, assembled by British Prime Minister Tony Blair in 2004 to define the challenges facing Africa, and to provide clear recommendations on how to support the changes needed to reduce poverty. The report is in two parts. The first, The Argument, addresses itself to a wider audience and sets out the Commission's call to action. The second part, The Analysis and Evidence, lays out the substance and basis of the recommendations. Recommendations are set out between these two sections. Topics covered include governance, peace and security, social issues such as education, health and vulnerability, and economic growth and development

Preventing chronic diseases : a vital investment. Overview

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

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This report urges health planners and decision-makers influence multisectoral government action to prevent chronic diseases. It dispels the long-held misunderstandings about heart disease, stroke, cancer and other chronic diseases that have contributed to their global neglect. It states clearly that 80% of the 35 million chronic disease-related deaths in 2005 will occur in low and middle income countries, where they affect men and women at younger ages than in high income countries. Premature deaths in countries such as China, India and the Russian Federation are projected to cost billions of dollars over the next 10 years

Mainstreaming of disability and HIV/AIDS : a double challenge

DE GREVE, A
2005

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This paper describes how organisations take into account, or mainstream, disability and/or HIV and AIDS in their work. In the introduction, guest writer Nora Groce discusses the link between disability and HIV/AIDS and the similarities between the issues. The next chapters examine different forms of mainstreaming, and then discuss the arguments for and against mainstreaming disability and/or HIV/AIDS. Chapter 3 deals with the basic principles of the mainstreaming process. Chapter 4 discusses the integration of the disability and/or HIV/AIDS factor in development activities. This includes activities of and with partners in the South, ie socio-economic projects, awareness raising and training activities in the South. It discusses how mainstreaming implicates the representation and participation of persons with a disability and/or living with HIV or AIDS, and the relevant interest organisations representing both groups, in the initial phases of the project as well in implementation. Chapter 5 deals with mainstreaming in organisational policy. There is a need for Northern NGOs as well as Southern partners to actively adapt their policy to take into account disability and/or HIV/AIDS. Both themes should be integrated into the whole organisational structure, and taken into account when setting up activities and in workplace policy

Global health watch 2005-2006 : an alternative world health report

LEMA, Claudia
et al
2005

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This report is the result of a collaboration of leading popular movements, NGOs, activists, academics and health workers. It provides an evidence-based analysis of the political economy of health and health care and challenges policies and initiatives of global organisations including the World Bank, the World Health Organization and UNICEF. Many key issues relevant to health are covered, including health care services and systems, health of vulnerable groups, climate change, food and water, education, armed conflicts. Part E also provides and assessment of the impact global institutions, transnational corporations and rich countries. This report is a call for action, directed to health workers and activists and national and international policy-makers

Universal birth registration : a universal responsibility

PLAN INTERNATIONAL
2005

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This publication is the final report arising from a Plan International campaign on universal birth registration. Article 7 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child states that 'the child shall be registered immediately after birth and shall have the right to a name and the right to acquire a nationality'. Most recent statistics estimate that 36 percent of children are currently not registered. Without a birth certificate, children may have difficulty proving to officials that they are eligible for assistance at times of personal and national crisis. They may have problems accessing human rights such as care and education. They can be at risk of exclusion and not fulfilling their potential by operating at a disadvantage within social, cultural, economic and political spheres. This campaign aims to ensure that evey child is registered at birth

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