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Informe regional America Latina Bajo El enfoque de la convencion sobre los derechos de las personas con discapicidad

March 2019

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Este primer informe regional de la situación de las personas con discapacidad en América Latina ha sido elaborado por RIADIS con la finalidad de realizar un primer acercamiento al estado de la implementación de los ODS bajo el enfoque de la CDPD y la reformulación del Programa de Acción del Decenio de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA). En este sentido, el informe pretende identificar los avances y buenas prácticas que se encuentran realizando los gobiernos de la región en materia de la aplicación de la CDPD a través de la implementación de los ODS en la región, así como establecer las oportunidades y los desafíos que se presentan para que las organizaciones de personas con discapacidad puedan seguir conquistando nuevos espacios y haciendo efectivo el ejercicio pleno de sus derechos. El presente informe se enfoca en diez principales áreas temáticas, identificadas como prioritarias por las personas con discapacidad de la región, quienes aportaron al abordaje de las mismas, tanto a través de las respuestas que se recopilaron de la encuesta inicial, como a través de las contribuciones grupales e individuales obtenidas en el taller de revisión del borrador del informe regional.

 

Las diez áreas temáticas que se abordan en el presente informe son las siguientes: 1. Educación inclusiva 2. Mujeres con discapacidad 3. Personas indígenas con discapacidad 4. Inclusión laboral de las personas con discapacidad 5. Reducción de riesgos de desastres y acción humanitaria 6. Accesibilidad 7. Acceso a la justicia 8. Derecho a vivir de forma independiente y ser incluido en la comunidad 9. Recopilación de datos 10. Participación de las personas con discapacidad

ASEAN hometown national guidelines compilation

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)
March 2019

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The National Guidelines for the Project for ASEAN Hometown Improvement through DisabilityInclusive Communities Model: A Compilation is a consolidation of policies from 7 ASEAN countries, namely, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, to provide a technical guiding document in the planning and implementation of an inclusive Hometown Improvement process.

 

Policies for each country are reported and topics covered include: situation of persons with disabilities; disability inclusive governance; accessibility for persons with disabilities; disability inclusive business; hometown improvement model; and partnership amongst ASEAN

 

WHO consolidated guideline on self-care interventions for health: sexual and reproductive health and rights

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2019

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SELF-CARE is the ability of individuals, families and communities to promote health, prevent disease, maintain health, and to cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a health-care provider. 

The purpose of this guidance is to develop a peoplecentred, evidence-based normative guideline that will support individuals, communities and countries with quality health services and self-care interventions, based on PHC (Primary Health Care) strategies, comprehensive essential service packages and people-centredness. The specific objectives of this guideline are to provide:

• evidence-based recommendations on key public health self-care interventions, including for advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), with a focus on vulnerable populations and settings with limited capacity and resources in the health system

• good practice statements on key programmatic, operational and service-delivery issues that need to be addressed to promote and increase safe and equitable access, uptake and use of self-care interventions, including for advancing SRHR.

Strengthening participation of people with disabilities in leadership roles in developing countries

PRICE, Roz
April 2018

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Evidence on strategies/pathways for strengthening people with disabilities’ leadership in political and public life, at all levels of governance (formal and informal) is reviewed.

Topics discussed concerning participation in political and public life include: UNCRPD; barriers; strategies to support inclusive electoral and political processes; womens empowerment; capacity building and training; the role of disability movements and DPOs; affirmative action and quotas; election observation and increasing the visibility of people with disabilities 

 

K4D helpdesk report

INCLUDE US! Good practices in the inclusion of persons with disabilities in Myanmar

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
2018

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In 2015, Humanity & Inclusion HI began the project: “Empowering persons with disabilities to contribute to equal access to basic social services and local policymaking processes in under-resourced areas of Ayeyarwady and Mandalay”. The project supported Disabled Peoples Organizations and other civil society groups to participate in the development of inclusive regional policies and programmes, and to promote good practices contributing to greater access to services for persons with disabilities. An aim was also to document, publish and disseminate these good practices throughout Myanmar, increasing awareness and understanding in order to sensitise people to disability inclusion and influence policy change. Rather than focusing on what is not working, this report seeks to shift attention to what has worked locally and how it could be replicated in other parts of the country, providing constructive, practical recommendations to decision-makers, service providers and other community groups in Myanmar. The report is related to two projects. The second is “Advocacy for Change: Fostering protection and rights of men and women with disabilities in Myanmar”. 

 

There are global recommendations. There are seven good practices:

  • Related to education:  Case Study I: Promoting Inclusion of children with disabilities in Middle Schools of Ayartaw. Case Study II: How the development of the teacher training promotes inclusion of all children in education
  • Related to economic life: Case Study III: How partnerships between private companies and organizations of people with disabilities can improve access to employment and vocational training
  • Related to social/community life: Case Study IV: Giving the Myanmar Deaf Community access to information.  Case Study V: How parental advocacy can make a difference
  • Related to political life: Case Study VI: Community advocacy in obtaining the National Registration Card. Case Study VII: Supporting people with disabilities to participate in Myanmar elections

 

Everybody Matters: Good practices for inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes

Van SLOBBE, Caroline
November 2017

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This publication provides introductory chapters from two activists who work to create better opportunities for people with disabilities in Nigeria and India. Subsequently, the challenges that organisations worldwide have encountered whilst improving the access to and knowledge of sexual and reproductive health and rights for people with disabilities are presented. Ways in which they managed to find solutions and the results achieved are reviewed. Some cases show the importance of a more personal approach whilst others emphasise the advantage of changing systems and policies. Different regions, types of disabilities and various SRHR-topics are reflected in these stories. All cases provide lessons learnt that contribute to a set of recommendations for improved responses. The closing chapter highlights the challenges, solutions, and ambitions that are presented and lead up to a concise overview of recommendations.  

Good practice examples include:

A shift in SRH programming (Nepal)

Breaking Barriers with performance art (Kenya)

Her Body, Her Rights (Ethiopia)

People with disabilities leading the way (Israel Family Planning Association)

Best Wishes for safe motherhood (Nepal)

It’s my body! (Bangladesh)

Calling a spade a spade (Netherlands)

Four joining forces (Colombia)

Change agents with a disability (Zimbabwe)

Tito’s privacy and rights (Argentina)

Sign language for service providers (Kenya)

Good practice report on inclusive education and employment for people with disabilities in Bangladesh

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI)
2017

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This report is the output of a project titled “Advocating for Change for Persons with disabilities in South and South-east Asia” which was implemented by Handicap International for the period January 2013 – June 2014. In Bangladesh, the project supported Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in 17 districts across the country, developing their capacity to advocate for rights of people with disabilities in education and employment. This report has been compiled to showcase good practices collected by DPOs and to promote practical recommendations, based on local evidence, on how to include people with disabilities in employment and education systems in Bangladesh. The Making it Work methodology was used as part of this project.

This report includes the 11 validated good practices including

  • to ensure access of people with disabilities to waged employment n factories
  • to ensure waged employment of people with disabilities though the Chamber of Commerce and Industries
  • to ensure access to start up capital for people with disabilities
  • to use local initiative to create educational opportunities for children with disabilities
  • to ensure access of students with disabilities to secondary education through social mobilisation by school authorities
  • to ensure access of children with disabilities to inclusive primary education
  • to ensure physical accessibility for children with disabilities in high schools
  • to ensure free of cost High School education for children with disabilities

Achieving professional integration of young people with disabilities - Collection of good practices and shared experiences in Casablanca, Morocco

TORRECILLA, Audrey
November 2016

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This publication aims to analyze and disseminate good practices implemented throughout the project called "Improving access to employment for Young people with disabilities in the Greater Casablanca. " To assess the success of this project, it was needed to meet the people with disabilities that benefited from work placement in the companies. The following testimonies come from smiling, dynamic people who, thanks to a stable employment, are able to project into the future.Their disability has become "a detail": for their Colleagues, they are Anouar, Zineb, Mustafa, Anas, Yasmine ... competent staff who as everyone in the company brings an added value. Rabii And Sanaa, who both work as inclusion agents at the AMH Group and in the association called ANAÏS, contributed greatly to these personal and professional achievements. Every day they accompany, advise, facilitate training, prepare disabled young people for the labor market, but they also approach companies and propose nominations. The career paths exposed in this publication are encouraging towards continuing their efforts, along with ANAPEC and the other players at stake in the inclusion sector: not only professional, but also every Moroccan companies and the CGEM, to allow Young people with disabilities to access to stable and rewarding work places. As for the companies, the results speak for themselves: trained human resources departments, formalized action plans to implement disability policies, CSR targets achieved, and skilled employees providing added value to the teams.

Prosthetics & orthotics impact assessment : India and Bangladesh

COCHRANE, Helen
ROSARIO, Demetria
SINGH, Anil
GHOSH, Ritu
June 2015

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Mobility India is the only International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics​ (ISPO) recognised program in India offering training for ISPO Category II single discipline. From 2002 to the time of the study Mobility India enrolled two hundred and twenty-one students. This study was conducted in association with ISPO’s USAID funded programme: ‘Rehabilitation of physically disabled people in developing countries’. Activities included: field visits to India and Bangladesh, interviewing Ministry officials, Heads of Clinical Services and Heads of Prosthetic and Orthotic Departments;  a partial audit of graduate clinical skills and competencies and determining the professional development needs of graduates in selected South-East Asian countries; and listening to service users, hearing stories of how services had directly impacted upon their lives. Services in India and Pakistan are outlined and 22 recommendations to help to further develop prosthetic and orthotic services are provided.

Technical report 1 : mapping of organisations in Indonesia in disaster risk reduction [MOIDRR]

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the first Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the mapping of organisations in Indonesia working in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The two year project was concerned with understanding the gaps between disability inclusive policy and practices in DRR and supporting opportunities to include people with disabilities in all phases of disaster risk management. The premise of this work was that reducing the vulnerability of people with disability during disasters is a key strategy to promote broader community resilience

 

The direct and practical solutions that people with disability can offer to community-level DRR activities should be a key consideration within all phases of disaster risk management. Inclusion of people with disabilities in DRR before, during, and after disasters contributes to the “whole-of-community” approach to disaster resilience advocated in contemporary policy and enacted by DRR agencies. This project was initially framed within an increasing awareness of disability inclusion in DRR globally which is now articulated in the recently issued Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (UNDISR, 2015), and within an increasingly supportive policy environment in Indonesia

Technical report 3 : the disability inclusive disaster resilience (DiDR) tool : development and field-testing

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the third Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the development, refinement and field–testing of the Disability Inclusive Disaster Resilience (DiDR) tool. The purpose of the DiDR tool is to identify the resilience and capabilities of people with disabilities to natural disasters in their family and community setting. The tool is designed to be used by people with disabilities, their families or carers and thereby to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) policy making and strategy implementation. The tool assesses the resilience of people with disabilities by bringing together four components known to be fundamental to disaster risk reduction: the individual’s functioning status, their level of participation in their communities, the physical vulnerability of their place of residence, and individual risk predictors known to influence the behaviour of the general population before, during and after a natural hazard emergency. In February and March 2015, the survey teams administered the DiDR Tool by interviewing 289 people with disabilities or their carers in four Indonesian Districts affected by diverse natural hazards 

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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The purpose of this document is to share good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences. More specifically, it is intended to 1) provide a clear indication to HIV and AIDS practitioners that disability mainstreaming in HIV and AIDS is indeed possible and workable in various contexts and by implementing specific steps/initiatives; 2) transfer concrete knowledge and practices to disability stakeholders, including disabled people's organisations, on how to work in HIV and AIDS; and 3) persuade HIV-related development partners that more investment is needed to develop this knowledge base in order to bring about practical changes at micro, meso and macro levels, as well as among the population. The good practices are also intended to inspire and motivate other organisations and agencies to use and replicate them in other contexts and countries, if/when they are adapted to the needs and situations of people with disabilities and communities

LL 07

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence : brief

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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This brief is an introduction to the lessons learned document on good practices about the inclusion of disability in HIV policy and programming. Good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming are highlighted, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences

LL No 7 Brief 

The future is inclusive. How to make international development disability-inclusive

KEOGH, Mary
January 2014

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This first publication in our series on disability inclusive development covers key facts and figures on the situation of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities living in lowincome countries and presents the reasons why development and humanitarian actions must be disability-inclusive. •

Chapter 1 introduces the key concepts in disability-inclusive development and reflects also on CBM’s own journey towards disability-inclusive development.

Chapter 2 highlights why the inclusion of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities is important for effective development and humanitarian outcomes.  

Chapter 3 sets out why the human rights of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities are closely associated with development both at home and in international cooperation.

Chapter 4 highlights the key issues which cause barriers to disability-inclusive development, and provides a set of principles, case studies and good practice examples of how it can be achieved.  

Chapter 5 concludes with some key messages and introduces the topics that we will address in future publications in this series.

Empowerment and participation : good practices from South & South-East Asia in disability inclusive disaster risk management

BOLTE, Patrick
MARR, Samadhi
SITOMPU, Dewi
et al
2014

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This report presents good practices showing examples of inclusion and active participation of persons with disabilities in disaster risk management. The paper is structured in three sections that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities.

Section A provides the background on disability inclusive disaster risk management and reviews existing guidelines as to how the participation of people with disabilities in disaster risk management can be facilitated. 

Section B contains the actual good practices, structured in three separate chapters that illustrate general recommendations towards greater participation of persons with disabilities. Each practice highlights the involvement of individual persons as well as groups, describes the initial setting, the achievements, and the lessons learned from the practice. Each practice concludes with a box with key insights.

The final section C presents the key recommendations that can be drawn from the good practices and that are geared to inform future programming

Disaster resilience in an ageing world : how to make policies and programmes inclusive of older people

HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL
2014

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“This publication aims to promote age-inclusive resilience-building among practitioners and policy-makers. It gives a comprehensive overview of how resilience-building programmes should be designed and implemented to ensure the inclusion of older people. It also highlights the benefits of including and empowering older people through DRR and resilience-building activities. By applying an older people lens to DRR programming, which involves assessing the specific vulnerabilities and capacities of older people and encouraging them to take a more proactive role, we can support older people to become more resilient – with wide ranging benefits for themselves, their families, and their wider communities. We have included case studies to highlight good practice, demonstrating what can be achieved by working for and with older people” 

Resilient livelihoods : disaster risk reduction for food and nutrition security framework programme

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
April 2013

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Through its disaster risk reduction (DRR) activities, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) seeks to protect livelihoods from shocks, to make food production systems more resilient and more capable of absorbing the impact of, and recovering from, disruptive events. The FAO Disaster Risk Reduction for Food and Nutrition Security Framework Programme (DRR for FNS) serves to support and provide strategic direction, to FAO member countries and partners, for the implementation of Disaster Risk Reduction for Food and Nutrition Security programmes. The goal is to enhance the resilience of livelihoods against threats and emergencies to ensure the FNS of vulnerable farmers, fishers, herders, foresters and other at risk groups

Linking CBR, disability and rehabilitation

MUSOKE, Grace
GEISER, Priscille
Eds
2013

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This 4th book in the series can be used as a basis for future action throughout the African continent. The content provides an overview of present day CBR knowledge, and also details how this information has been interpreted and implemented in the African context. The writers are predominantly of African origin and provide insightful views of the dynamic nature of CBR and its capacity to respond to contextually different challenges. Examples are provided from their own CBR experiences and case studies of their programmes, highlighting the problems they face and how they were overcome

The content of this book has been developed from conference presentations and discussions, and some chapters have been reinforced with additional information from discussions or relevant literature. The end of each chapter provides references to the academic literature used by the authors

4th CBR Africa Conference

Abuja, Nigeria

26th-29th October 2010

Local development in West Africa : how to make it inclusive for all?

DIMBARRE KPEHOUNTON, Cathy
et al
January 2013

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“With the push towards decentralization, local governments are gradually emerging as development agents. Overarching development policies are shaped at a national level while public policies are devised and implemented at the local level by local authorities. This film showcases local stakeholders’ contribution to development. It aims to answer the question posed by many local government representatives: ‘How to make local development policies inclusive for all?’ ‘Making it INCLUSIVE’ means not only enabling the citizens to partake in consultation and decision-making processes, but also offering them equal access to services. Within this framework the most vulnerable groups, including people with disabilities, are treated on a par with others”

Good practices in the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the Tibet Autonomous Region, China : how to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities are promoted and respected?

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
November 2012

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The report is a collection of good practices of inclusion of people with disabilities in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China, compiled through the ‘Support to DPOs’ project. Making It Work methodology was used to collect good practice of social integration and participation by people with disabilities; good practice in terms of working methods to ensure partner ownership and long term sustainability; and good practice in terms of process, such as participative working methods to ensure the long-term ‘real’ inclusion of persons with disabilities. The target of the report is the Disability Working Committee, the key Government body in decision making on disability issues. The report considers 13 case studies on such topics as DPO activity, inclusive education, community participation, rehabilitation and livelihoods. For each case study, influencing factors (positive and negative) are identified, and possible improvements and recommendations for replication suggested. This collection of good practices gives a diverse range of possible actions for the enhanced inclusion of persons with disabilities; combining access to services (early education, mainstream education, and rehabilitation), arts and culture, awareness-raising, and active participation in political and social life

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