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Unmet needs and use of assistive products in two districts of Bangladesh: Findings from a household survey

PRYOR, Wesley
NGUYEN, Liem
ISLAM, Qumrun Naher
JALAL, Faruk, Ahmed
MANJULA, Marella
December 2018

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Access to assistive products (AP) is an under-researched public health issue. Using an adaptation of a draft World Health Organization tool—the ‘Assistive Technology Assessment—Needs (ATA-N)’ for measuring unmet needs and use of AP, we aimed to understand characteristics of AP users, self-reported needs and unmet needs for AP, and current access patterns in Bangladesh. The ATA-N was incorporated in a Rapid Assessment of Disability (RAD), a population-based survey to estimate prevalence and correlates of disability. In each of two unions of Kurigram and Narsingdi districts, 60 clusters of 50 people each aged two years and older were selected using a two-staged cluster random sampling process, of whom, 4250 (59% Female; 41% Male) were adults, including 333 using AP. We estimate 7.1% of the studied population used any AP. AP use is positively associated with age and self-reported functional difficulty. The proportion of people using AP is higher for mobility than for sensory and cognitive difficulties. Of all people with any functional difficulty, 71% self-reported an unmet need for AP. Most products were home or self-made, at low cost, but provided benefits. Needs and unmet needs for AP are high, especially for people with greater functional difficulties. Assessing unmet needs for AP revealed important barriers to scale that can inform policy and practice.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2901;
doi:10.3390/ijerph15122901

Benefits and costs of e-accessibility : how economics and market forces can support e-accessibility and the convention on the rights of peoples' with disability

BURGER, Dominique
et al
March 2012

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This white paper seeks to document the innovative elements of a conference discussion about e-accessibility costs and benefits. Despite technological and political achievements, the economics of e-accessibility need to be understood. This paper aims to define new approaches to understand how best to promote e-accessibility models
E-Accessibility costs and benefits
Paris, France
28 March 2011

The OPERA framework : assessing compliance with the obligation to fulfil economic, social and cultural rights

CORKERY, Allison
WAY, Sally-Anne Way
OTERO, Victoria Wisniewski
2012

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“This paper presents a practical framework for integrating different tools and techniques in order to provide a more comprehensive assessment of how public policies comply with the obligation to fulfill ESC rights. The OPERA framework (so called because it triangulates Outcomes, Policy Efforts and Resources to make an overall Assessment) articulates relevant human rights standards and principles to take into account when monitoring ESC rights fulfillment and offers practical guidance on which tools and techniques might be employed to evaluate them. These range from simple descriptive statistics that summarize data to more complex fiscal policy and budget analysis that assess the availability and allocation of resources. By making explicit this crucial link between the various human rights standards and principles that underpin the obligation to fulfill and the different assessment methods available to monitor them, the framework enables a systematic approach to building evidence of failures to fulfill ESC rights”

The contributions of ICTs to pro-poor growth

BATCHELOR, Simon
SCOTT, Nigel
TAYLOR, Nigel
March 2005

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A background paper prepared for the DAC Network on Poverty Reduction. It provides a useful overview of definitions of ICT, pro-poor growth thinking and impacts on poverty

Undergraduate medical and pharmacy education : the need for change and the way forward

2005

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This is a report of the Second International Consultation on Undergraduate Medical and Pharmacy Education, convened by Health Action International Asia Pacific (HAIAP) in collaboration with the South East Asia Regional Office (SEARO) and the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO) of the World Health Organization (WHO). It attempts to identify the shortfalls of medical and pharmacy education in the context of developing countries, indigenous cultures and changing expectations and demands on the profession. The consultation produced a series of recommendations, including introducing social, economic and ethical concepts in medical education and making access to information resources more available to pharmacy students and pharmacists

Social capital and coping with economic shocks : an analysis of stunting of South African children

CARTER, M R
MALUCCIO, J A
2002

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This study explores household coping capacity in relation to social context and community supporting networks, using data on household responses to economic shocks and their effects on child nutritional status. It makes a critical point, supported by evidence, that households in communities with more social capital seem better able to weather economic shocks

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