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Knowledge translation : a Research Matters toolkit|Bridging the 'know-do' gap : a resource for researchers

CAMPBELL, Sandy
et al
November 2008

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Knowledge Translation (KT) works to knit together research and action. "An intensely social process, KT depends upon relationships....[It has] three core principles: - Knowledge. KT efforts at any level depend upon a robust, accessible and contextualized knowledge base. - Dialogue. The relationships at the heart of KT can only be sustained through regular, two-way dialogue and exchange. - Capacity. Researchers, decision-makers and other research-users require a strengthened skill-base to create and respond to KT opportunities." The introduction is also available in French

Listen to our stories : words, pictures, and songs by young people with disabilities

HILLYER, Linda
2008

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Listen to Our Stories highlights poetry, essays, interviews, songs, journal writing, letters, and pictures that tell the personal stories of young people with disabilities. The contributors are young girls and boys aged 5 to 21, from varied backgrounds, different talents and a range of disabilities. This website may be useful to anyone interested in personal life stories and experiences, written or told by children and young adults with disabilities

How information is shared among CBR service providers in Uganda

COMMUNITY ACTION RESEARCH ON DISABILITY IN UGANDA
2008

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This study examines how information is shared among CBR programmes in Uganda and identifies challenges and strategies for improvement. Recommendations include the development of strategies for the oral means of information sharing; awareness raising of cost effective means of information sharing and using modes of communication that can reach people with special needs. This resource is useful for people interested in how information is shared among CBR programmes in Uganda

HIV & AIDS awareness and training projects for blind and partially sighted persons in Africa : end of project report

NDUTA, Sally
December 2007

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This is the final report of the HIV & AIDS awareness and training projects for blind and partially sighted persons in Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda and Tanzania. Including a summary of the workshops and trainings conducted across these countries, the aim is to highlight achievements, share research and put forth a set of recommendations about mainstreaming disability issues into HIV & AIDS programmes

The straight talk campaign in Uganda : impact of mass media initiatives

ADAMCHK, Susan E.
et al
September 2007

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This summary report presents the findings of an evaluation of the Straight Talk mass media communication programmes to inform youth in Africa about sexual and reproductive health, which have been implemented in Uganda since 1993. The campaign was delivered through a radio show and two newspapers - one aimed at primary school children and one at secondary school students

The world health report 2007 - a safer future : global public health in the 21st century

World Health Organization (WHO)
August 2007

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"This report dicusses...current challenges to global health secturity and asks: How can a safer future be acheived? It looks at the potential new tools for collective defence, particularly the revised 'International Health Regulations' (2005) which came into force [in 2007]...[It] concludes with recommendations intended to provide guidance and inspiration towards cooperation and transparency in the effort to secrure the highest level of global public health security"

At the heart of change : the role of communication in sustainable development

WILSON, Mark
WARNOCK, Kitty
SCHOEMAKER, Emrys
2007

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This paper shows how information, communication, the media and ICTs are powerful agents of change, how they can give 'voice' to the poor and contribute to more sustainable development, but it also emphasises the need to support and strengthen communication processes used by poor and marginalised people who already face many barriers to receiving information, and to develop the skills and capacity of those people to make their own voices heard. It concludes by suggesting an agenda for action by policy makers, development experts, international organisations, non-governmental organisations and the private sector (including the media)

How to accelerate your Internet : a practical guide to bandwidth management and optimisation using open source software

FLICKENGER, R
Ed
October 2006

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Information and communications technologies and the Internet have become critical components of development policies and practices. The speed of the Internet, however, is also the measure of a growing disparity between developed and developing countries. This publication provides practical tips, optimisation techniques and guidance on how to gain the largest benefits from network connections, with a particular focus on use of Internet in developing countries. Chapters cover a comprehensive range of issues, from policy development to monitoring and analysis, implementation of basic techniques, and general good practices. Include case studies, resources and glossary

'The last thing the world needs is another website' : the role of evidence in integrating information and communication into development policy

PERKINS, Nicholas
Ed
October 2006

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This summary paper outlines the interim findings from the ICD (Information and Communication for Development) Knowledge Sharing and Learning programme. It summarises the communication processes that are needed to engage with policy makers in order to embed effective information and communication within their development policies and practice

Strengthening women's rights organizations through inclusion : lessons learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute

ROSENHEK, Sarah
September 2006

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Largely based on information gathered at the Mobility International (MI) USA's Gender, Disability and Development Institute (GDDI), this report asserts that inclusion of women with disabilities is not only feasible, but easy. This resource identifies how women's organisations can include disabled women in their work and ensure active participation. It explores a range of factors including; transport and accessibility, leadership opportunities; and participation. Useful for anyone with an interest in gender equality, disability and inclusion

Electronic resource for media on HIV and AIDS

DAVIES, Jackie
July 2006

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The past two decades have seen the advent of two significant global developments: the spread of HIV and AIDS, and the creation of the Internet. Both of these factors have had a profound effect on many societies, and both are areas of conflict and controversy. An increasing number of media support organisations are using the Internet to provide information and training resources to media workers in developing countries. These electronic resources, or e-resources, are aimed at assisting media to produce effective communication about HIV and AIDS. But are e-resources relevant, how are they being developed and what factors need to be considered to ensure they are effective? This paper aims to explore these questions by examining the HIV and AIDS communication context for local media, and their information and communication needs. E-resources for HIV and AIDS communication are briefly outlined, and gaps and challenges identified; and finally conclusions and recommendations are presented

Policy engagement for poverty reduction : how civil society can be more effective

COURT, Julius
June 2006

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This briefing paper draws on a report by Julius Court and others entitled 'Policy engagement: how can civil society be more effective', also published by ODI. It examines the role of civil society organisations in poverty reduction strategies and looks at ways to enhance their influence on the policy making process. Inadequate knowledge about the policy making process, lack of resources, insufficient capacity and policy makers' mistrust of CSOs are the main obstacles to their full engagement in policy making. Effective approaches should entail: campaigning and implementation of pilot projects aimed at improving adverse political contexts; rigorous mapping and assessment of political contexts; identify critical policy stages; provide relevant and objective evidence; use effective communication methods and strategies; apply network approaches; engage in systematic capacity building

Young people and social capital

BOECK, Thilo
FLEMING, Jennie
KEMSHALL, Hazel
June 2006

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This brief paper explores the concept of social capital and its bearing on young people's lives. In particular it distinguishes between a static social capital (strong/static networks, immediate reciprocity, restricted sense of belonging and outlook in life) and dynamic social capital (diverse networks, generalised reciprocity and diverse outlook). It suggests that young people should be encouraged to embrace an enhanced version of dynamic social capital, and should be offered opportunities to do so. An enhanced dynamic social capital would enable them to cope with risks rather that avoid them, and would give them access to more power and opportunities

Social capital and transnational South Asian families : rituals, care and provision

MAND, Kanwal
March 2006

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This paper looks at social capital in the context of migration. It challenges the view that critical processes of social changes such as migration undermine and weaken social capital assets. It shows how transnational networks are strengthened and maintained, and social norms enhanced and replicated as a coping strategy in times of social changes. The paper focuses in particular on family ties, ethnicity, gender, household, care and provision. Some of the conclusions may be applied to other contexts, such as emergency situations, conflict situations and contexts of particular hardship

Soul City

January 2006

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The Soul City Institute for Health and Development Communication (SC IHDC) is a social change project which aims to impact on society at the individual, community and socio-political levels. SC IHDC is South Africa's premier edutainment project. The webiste includes details and publications about all major Soul City projects, including evaluation reports, advocacy material and training material

Getting started in electronic publishing

MORRIS, Sally
2006

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Many journals around the world struggle to attract authors and readers, and frequently suffer from a lack of resources - both human and financial. In addition, research habits are changing and researchers increasingly expect any information to be found online which means that a journal which cannot be located on the web may be effectively invisible. Online publications can help to address some of these issues. At the same time, many readers still seem to prefer print so it may not be possible to stop producing a print edition as well.
Publishing a journal electronically sounds very attractive. There are a number of good reasons for doing so, but it does have disadvantages too. Before committing to the effort and expense involved in online publication, it is sensible to look carefully at both the advantages and disadvantages. In the end, the decision will depend on what the main objectives are, so it is important to be clear about the reasons for publishing in the first place: what information is being disseminated, and to whom

eHealth tools and services : needs of the member states. Report of the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) GLOBAL OBSERVATORY FOR EHEALTH
2006

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This is a report on some of the findings of a global survey on eHealth carried out by the Global Observatory for eHealth (GOe), concerning the needs for eHealth tools and services. The survey found that WHO Member States would welcome an active involvement of WHO in the development of generic eHealth tools, while particularly non-OECD members would benefit form guidance on eHealth issues. It also found that needs vary even among OECD countries, and that existing eHealth tools and services should be better known. The report recommends that WHO should actively intervene in the provision of generic tools (eg, drug registries, patient record systems, health professional directories), facilitate access to existing tools, promote knowledge exchange, provide eHealth information and promote eLearning programmes

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