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Universal declaration on cultural diversity

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
2001

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This Declaration supports cultural diversity, cultural rights and the role of culture in development - as a key component of human rights. It states that "All persons have [...] the right to express themselves and to create and disseminate their work in the language of their choice, and particularly in their mother tongue; all persons are entitled to quality education and training that fully respect their cultural identity; and all persons have the right to participate in the cultural life of their choice and conduct their own cultural practices, subject to respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms"

Networks for development : lessons learned from supporting national and regional networks on legal, ethical and human rights dimensions of HIV/AIDS

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP). HIV AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
October 2000

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The two principal aims of this publication are to synthesise and disseminate key lessons learned from a decade of experience supporting the establishment and development of networks. It will be useful to anyone considering offering support to networks in order to address a specific development challenge. It should also be useful to those, including activists, who are planning to establish networks

Popular communications [whole issue]

October 2000

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The special theme section of this issue of PLA Notes examines how popular communications can be used to engage with local people and bring the views of those who are generally excluded to a broader arena for sharing and exchange. It illustrates how popular media can act as a powerful mechanism to bring policy makers and local people together and shows the potential of certain popular communications techniques (eg participatory video, theatre for development etc) for community empowerment.The issue also contains five general issues on PLA approaches and experiences

Measuring the difference : guide to planning and evaluating health information outreach

BURROUGHS, Catherine M
WOOD, Fred B
September 2000

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This guide presents a programmatic and goal-orientated approach to outreach activities. The premise of this approach is that evaluation is an integral part of programme development: planning and evaluating an outreach initiative is one and the same process, and asking the right questions at the beginning is essential for getting useful results at the end. The guide is practical in purpose, with checklists, worksheets and examples, but also heavily theory-based, offering a range of methodological possibilities and strategies. The guide should be useful to community organisations, libraries, clinics or other groups seeking to affect the capacity of individuals or communities to use health information resources and to address barriers to access, through simple or complex outreach projects. It is not specifically written for developing-country contexts

Access for all : helping to make participatory processes accessible for everyone

SAVE THE CHILDREN
2000

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This manual draws attention to different aspects of the accessibility of meetings, written documents, visual communications, presentations, environment and accommodation. It gives an overview of the major issues around accessibility for disabled people and presents practical adaptations to enable disabled people to be included in participatory activities

Everyday braille

ROYAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND (RNIB)
2000

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Aimed at family and friends of braille users, it explains how even a little braille can make a difference to the life of a blind or partially sighted person. Available in print and in braille.

Working with the media in conflicts and other emergencies

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
2000

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A guide written primarily for DFID staff, highlighting the benefits, challenges and options when considering funding media/communications interventions. Includes sections on when to support such initiatives; what types of assistance to provide media organisations; how to appraise and monitor media interventions. Also supplies intervention frameworks to assist in identifying relevant interventions; advice on supporting balanced, responsible reporting; case studies; lists of relevant organisations, contacts within DFID, and further reading

Using the Internet to share research and knowledge

LAMB, R
2000

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Overview of using websites and email to communicate research findings. Recommends using e-mail to build one-to-one dialogue rather than to send out press releases or other mass mailings. Sees the strength of websites as providing a public space for publications and databases

Telemedicine versus face to face patient care : effects on professional practice and health care outcomes

CURRELL, R
et al
2000

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A Cochrane systematic review assessing the effects of telemedicine compared to direct patient care. Seven trials were included including studies in the emergency department, videoconsultations between primary and outpatients department, home care provision or self monitoring. Suggests that policy makers should be cautious about recommending increased use and investment in unevaluated technologies

Towards ethical guidelines for dealing with unsolicited patient emails and giving teleadvice in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship : systematic review and expert survey

EYSENBACH, G
2000

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A systematic review looking at email communication, solicited and unsoliticed between patient and clinician, whether these constitute medical practice and clinicians are ethically obligated to respond. The review seeks to provide a set of guiding ethical principles applicable to this interaction

Disseminating health information in developing countries : the role of the internet

TAN-TORRES EDEJER, T
2000

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This article notes that information and communication technologies have not been harnessed systematically to improve the health of populations in developing countries and that the current digital divide is more dramatic than any other inequity in health or income. It also states that the quality of health information available on the web is inconsistent, and the visibility of research from developing countries is limited and concludes that the way forward is to exploit the full interactivity of the internet, which allows rapid feedback and change to continuously mould information into useful knowledge

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