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Bridging the mobile disability gap in refugee settings

DOWNER, Matthew
September 2019

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This case study highlights refugees with disabilities’ access to mobile services and the benefits and challenges associated with using these services in three different humanitarian contexts. The analysis is based on a representative survey of refugees in three contexts: Bidi Bidi refugee settlement (Uganda), Kiziba refugee camp (Rwanda) and with urban refugees in Jordan. It also includes qualitative data drawn from two focus groups conducted with refugees with disabilities in Bidi Bidi and Kiziba. The survey used the Washington Group Questions (WGQs) to assess prevalence of disability amongst the refugee population

WFD’s position paper on the language rights of deaf children

WORLD FEDERATION OF THE DEAF
September 2016

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Early exposure to sign language and multilingualism, combined with strong family support for sign languages, best prepares deaf children for their future effective participation in society. This position paper covers language acquisition for deaf children, the benefits of multilingualism, multilingual education and interpreting UN CPRD Article 24 in support of sign bilingual education. 

Each section of the paper has International sign videos available.

Benefits and costs of e-accessibility : how economics and market forces can support e-accessibility and the convention on the rights of peoples' with disability

BURGER, Dominique
et al
March 2012

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This white paper seeks to document the innovative elements of a conference discussion about e-accessibility costs and benefits. Despite technological and political achievements, the economics of e-accessibility need to be understood. This paper aims to define new approaches to understand how best to promote e-accessibility models
E-Accessibility costs and benefits
Paris, France
28 March 2011

Making mobile phones and services accessible for persons with disabilities

NARASIMHAN, Nirmita
LEBLOIS, Axel
2011

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"This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies: technical accessibility features for handsets, accessible and assistive applications and services as well as business cases of companies which have implemented significant accessibility programs...(T)his report will be a useful resource for telecom regulators, mobile operators, organizations of persons with disabilities and other mobile stakeholders to develop successful accessibility policies and programs in their respective countries to equally serve persons of all abilities"

Strengthening women's rights organizations through inclusion : lessons learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute

ROSENHEK, Sarah
September 2006

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Largely based on information gathered at the Mobility International (MI) USA's Gender, Disability and Development Institute (GDDI), this report asserts that inclusion of women with disabilities is not only feasible, but easy. This resource identifies how women's organisations can include disabled women in their work and ensure active participation. It explores a range of factors including; transport and accessibility, leadership opportunities; and participation. Useful for anyone with an interest in gender equality, disability and inclusion

A historical overview of health disparities and the potential of eHealth solutions

GIBBONS, M
2005

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Over the past decade a rapidly expanding body of literature has demonstrated the existence of disparities in health and health care. While consensus has not emerged regarding the causes of disparities, they are generally thought to be related to sociocultural, behavioural, economic, environmental, biologic, or societal factors. To effectively address disparities, several authorities have suggested the need for greater information technology research and investments. eHealth researchers may be able to make significant contributions in this area through research and its applications. This paper begins with a historical overview of health disparities in the United States and Europe. It then discusses the role that the Internet, and access to the Internet, may play in the genesis of health disparities. Finally, this paper closes with a discussion of the potential benefits of eHealth applications and the possible contributions of the field to overcoming disparities in health and health care

Information and communication technologies and the effects of globalization : twenty-first century digital slavery for developing countries -- myth or reality?

OGUNSOLA, L A
2005

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This paper examines the ICT (Information and Communication Technology) revolution and the concept of globalization as they effect developing countries. The wide gap in availability and use of ICTs across the world and the influences ICTs exert on globalization at the expense of developing countries are carefully examined and suggestions and necessary policies are offered for developing countries to leap-frog the industrialization stage and transform their economies into high value-added information economies that can compete with the advanced countries on the global market. This is why it is important for Africa, in general, and Nigeria, in particular, to be aware of the implications, prepare to avoid the most telling consequences and prepare to meet its challenges

Can we achieve health information for all by 2015?

GODLEE, Fiona
et al
July 2004

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This article summarizes the attempts, since 1995, to utilize information and communication technology to bridge the health information gap between developing and industrialized countries. The authors note that the successes has been 'patchy' and that the potential has not been reached. Significant gaps continue between the north and south and also are seen between urban and rural areas especially for current clinical information. Stakeholders have not been involved sufficiently and there is considerable need for better telecommunications access and capacity building. The authors conclude that, without championing by a major player such as the WHO, the millennium goal of unviersal access to health information will not be reached despite some successes in the past 10 years

Open access to scholarly communication : new perspective for health professionals and scholars

SCARIA, Vinod
March 2004

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Open access is perhaps more relevant in the health domain than perhaps any other. This article provides a good background to the issue of open access in the health domain, providing a definition of open access; the three pillars of open access (open access publishing, open access archiving and open access support/advocacy). It also examines the funding of open access initiatives. Finally it provides links to Indian open access journals, a directory of open access journals and archives

Convention document legal analysis : a legal commentary on the draft convention text produced by the working group for the UN Ad Hoc Committee on a Comprehensive and Integral International Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights and Dign

LANDMINE SURVIVORS NETWORK
2004

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The legal analysis of the draft convention text Comprehensive and Integral International Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities is an exellent document explaining and commenting on the convention text. This document addresses both legal experts and people who need legal background information about the convention

Disabled people and the internet : experiences, barriers and opportunities

PILLING, Doria
BARRET, Paul
FLOYD, Mike
2004

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This report explores how provision of goods and services over the Internet affects people’s lives. While the Internet might have some capability to provide goods, services and communication at a distance, improving access in doing so, some research findings in the early days of e-commerce suggested diminished access for some groups.
This research focuses on the impact of the Internet on people with disabilities. There is the possibility that provision of information and services through the Internet might actually narrow rather than widen choices, because it might lead to the phasing out of traditional ways of providing services preferred by some disabled people

An information system and medical record to support HIV treatment in rural Haiti

FRASER, H S
et al
2004

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Recent studies have shown the feasibility of treating HIV/AIDS in developing countries. Lack of infrastructure, including information and communication systems, is considered a barrier to successful HIV treatment programmes. Internet based information systems offer a way to provide communication infrastructure in remote, resource-poor areas such as rural Haiti. A web based medical record system can be effectively used to track clinical outcomes, laboratory tests and drug supplies, and create reports for funding agencies. Development and evaluation of practical, low cost clinical information systems should be a priority in rolling out HIV treatment in developing countries

HINARI : Bridging the global information divide

KATIKIREDDI, S V
2004

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HINARI cannot reach everyone who might benefit. In many countries internet access is slow, expensive, and unreliable. Many poor institutions carrying out valuable research in countries with a GNP per capita of over $3000 per year are not eligible to use HINARI Information is often not available in electronic format - especially if it has been produced locally. The electronic format may be unsuitable for certain uses - for example, medical students in the developing world may benefit more from printed textbooks than from virtual textbooks that are only accessible from an unreliable internet connection at medical school. HINARI may also pose problems to researchers and health professionals working in the developing world. Allowing unrestricted access to much of the world's medical literature may produce an information overload and lead to valid and relevant information being difficult to find. This is particularly important for people who are not experienced in using information technology and reading primary research (but this problem occurs in the developed world too). Some valuable journals of specific relevance to the developing world (tropical medicine journals, for example) may not be available through HINARI as this may compromise publishers' commercial viability. Also, in a few countries, publishers withhold some journals because the sales of these journals are significant in these countries. However, institutions in these few countries are still able to access at least most of the key general medical and scientific journals without restrictions

Low cost access and connectivity : local solutions

UN ICT TASK FORCE
2004

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This publication, a UN ICT Task Force Working Group Paper, brings together case studies of local initiatives which highlight innovation in meeting the information and communication needs in developing countries. Seven papers explore connectivity and access issues in different countries. Papers on Benin and Cameroon are in French

The Internet in developing nations : grand challenges

PRESS, L
2004

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The author outlines the 'grand challenge' or $15 billion project for achieving truly global connectivity. It is based on the methodology for the development of the US National Science Foundation Network. The plan emphasizes the use of wireless technology and input on local means of delivery based on stakeholders' decisions. The author does discuss the intellectual property rights problem and the need to subsidize access in lesser developed regions

Advancing equity in health in Southern Africa : EQUINET publications 1998-2004

EQUINET
Ed
2004

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This CD-ROM provides a collection of EQUINET publications from 1998 to 2004 and includes dozens of policy papers, discussion papers, reports, resolutions, toolkits and training materials. EQUINET, the Regional Network on Equity in Health in Southern Africa, is a network of professionals, civil society members, policy makers, officials and other stakeholders and aims to promote equity and social justice in health.

Using knowledge management to make health systems work

BAILEY, Christopher
December 2003

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The discipline of knowledge management aims to bridge the gap between information availability and its communication in areas where the it is needed most. This editorial looks at two programmes that demonstrate how knowledge management can work

HINARI programme : bridging the knowledge gap

LONG, Maurice
December 2003

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The Health InterNetwork Access Initiative (HINARI) provides institutions in developing countries with free or reduced-price online access ot leading biomedical journals. This article describes the services HINARI offers to researchers in developing countries. Its strengths are that it is technically very simple, offereing authenticated users a simple gateway through which to pass directly to their journal of interest. However, one of the challenges is that many institutions in the developing world cannot aford the cost of connecting to the Internet, or do not have the necessary hardware

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