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Study on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq

NIJHOLT, Sarah
April 2019

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Handicap International (HI) commissioned a study on on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq. The overall objectives of the study were to:

  • Understand what explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes exist in Iraq;
  • Identify who is collecting such information, for which reasons and how it is being shared, and how it is being officially used;
  • Identify whether international victim data collection good practices and reporting standards are being followed up, and make concrete recommendations to help meet the standards;
  • Understand the successes, shortfalls, and challenges in data collection and information sharing;
  • Identify the needs of the data collection community in terms of ensuring sufficient victim reporting and data collection;
  • Identify if and how the data on victims is being collected and used by government authorities and the international fora.

 

Desk research was carried out and data collection took place in March 2019 in Erbil, Baghdad and Ninewa governorates in Iraq. In total, the qualitative researcher spent 3 days in Erbil, 4 days in Baghdad, and 6 days in Ninewa governorate to conduct interviews through a snowball approach. In total, 22 interviews were conducted with a variety of stakeholders, including humanitarian mine action actors, government officials, hospital directors, police and community leaders. This report provides an overview of the main findings.

Deaf people in Pacific Island countries. A design for the Pacific deaf strenthening program

JENKIN, Elena
WATERS, Philip
SEN, Krishneer
ADAM, Robert
2019

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Pacific Disability Forum (PDF) is committed to advancing the rights of people with disabilities living in Pacific Island Countries (PICs). Developing an evidence base to understand more about deaf children and adults’ experiences and priorities will better assist communities, DPOs, organisations and governments to plan inclusive communities, policy and programs.

 

The development of the design was deliberately planned to be highly collaborative and the team met with 161 people who shared their views. This provided opportunities for deaf people and DPOs to contribute to the design, along with representatives from government, non-government and regional organisations. This collaboration occurred in three countries in the Pacific, namely Solomon Islands, Samoa and Fiji. Within Fiji, the design team met with deaf and DPO representatives of other PIC’s along with regional multi-lateral organisations such as UNICEF and the Pacific Island Forum Secretariat (PIFS). Consultations also occurred remotely with supporting organisations and development workers that are focused on disability inclusion in the Pacific. The design undertook a desk review to learn what is known about deaf children and adults in the Pacific region. Participatory methods ensured the process was highly respectful of the views of deaf people. DPOs, other organisations and governments will be asked to identify to what extent deaf children, adults and their families are participating in services, programs and establishments, and to identify potential supports required to increase deaf people’s participation.  A capacity building element has been carefully built into the design. The report is divided into three parts. Part A rationalizes the design, with background information and a brief desk review to collect evidence from and about deaf children and adults in the Pacific. Part B describes the design development process and reports findings. Part C details the design for the situation analysis.  

Disability data collection: A summary review of the use of the Washington Group Questions by development and humanitarian actors

QUIGLEY, Nolan
et al
October 2018

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The Washington Group Questions on Disability are rapidly emerging as the preferred data collection methodology by the global community for national data collection efforts on disability. However, more and more development and humanitarian actors are now using the methodology in their own data collection efforts. This is beyond the original purpose of the questions, which was to generate usable data for governments. Leonard Cheshire and Humanity & Inclusion, two international charities focussed on disability and inclusion, have worked together to share learnings of recent research studies. These studies aim to understand how the Washington Group Questions (WGQ) have been used by development and humanitarian actors and the impact of using the methodology. This summary report outlines the key findings, analysis and conclusions about the application of the Washington Group Questions in a range of contexts. The report concludes with a number of recommendations for different stakeholders.

Digital Accessibility Toolkit

CBM
May 2018

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The purpose of this toolkit is to share a selection of tools and recommendations pertaining to the accessibility of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Based on international standards and a scan of available technologies, these tools and recommendations are intended to contribute to the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities by ensuring that information is equitably accessible.

The goals of this toolkit are:

  • To outline the key international frameworks around digital accessibility and why it is critical for inclusion of persons with disabilities.
  • To link people with tools, practice examples, free online training, and other resources so that their practice is digitally accessible.
  • To ensure that digital accessibility is an inherent aspect of daily practice.
  • To align the practices of those working with and for CBM. 

This toolkit is intended to be used as a guide and practice resource by people working with and for CBM so that we produce accessible digital content and communications, and place accessibility at the centre of our ICT procurement processes. We hope that the toolkit will be a resource for the wider community of persons with disabilities, Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs), and nongovernmental organisations (NGOs).

Portrayal of disabled people in the Kuwaiti media

ALENAIZI, Hussain Mohammed
2018

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"This paper explores the views of 10 participants on how the Kuwaiti media represents disabled people. Participants expressed their views through focus groups and interviews. The findings show that, generally, disabled people in Kuwait are shown in a negative light in the media. The media depicts disabled people as ‘pitiable’, ‘violent’, ‘sinister’, ‘tragic’, and as a ‘tool of ridicule’. The findings, however, witness some positive examples of media representation regarding how some TV shows portray deaf people in a positive light. On the other hand, the study suggests that learning disabled people are the most negatively depicted group in Kuwaiti society. There are also indications of implicit endorsement or internalisation by the participants of views of disabled people as ‘extraordinary’ despite the presence of their impairments. The study concludes that it is more important that the media shows the everyday lives of disabled people before showing their abilities and achievements"

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 1, 1315-1336

Network on inclusive employment of people with disabilities

SHEKULO TOV
2017

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The establishment of an international digital network on inclusive employment of people with disabilities is proposed.

The main goals of this digital network are to:

  • Enhance strategic networking, engagement and dialogue among the different stakeholders around the world
  • Disseminate cutting edge knowledge, good practice and innovations through diverse formats
  • Actively involve people with disabilities in the promoting this issue in all levels.

Activities of the network to include: an electronic mailing list; a monthly webinar and presentations of new research findings and evidences and of policy papers and information material

Virtual knowledge center to end violence against women and girls

UNITED NATIONS ENTITY FOR GENDER EQUALITY AND THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN
2017

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This Knowledge Centre is designed to serve the needs of policymakers, programme implementers and other practitioners dedicated to addressing violence against women and girls. It's primary purpose is to encourage and support evidence-based programming to more efficiently and effectively design, implement, monitor and evaluate initiatives to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls. To achieve this, the Global Virtual Knowledge Centre offers a ‘one stop’ service to users by making available the leading tools and evidence on what works to address violence against women and girls. It draws on expert recommendations, policy and programme evaluations and assessments, and fundamentally, on practitioners’ experiences from around the world

Fair’n square : a fair and equal world for all children

UNICEF
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This website presents information about a joint UNICEF-Handicap International programme on child disability in two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola. The focus of the project was to first identify children with disabilities and then ensure that these children could access services. The website features a useful video and practical case studies

Making it work : good practices for disability-inclusive development and humanitarian action

ADAMS, Lisa
GUY, Michael
LAST, Ulrike
2015

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“This practical guide outlines the Making it Work methodology. Making it Work aims to mobilise a group of organisations around a specific issue, document good examples of good practices and then support specific target groups to replicate or scale-up these practices...It provides a straightforward and flexible methodology that can be adapted to different organisations, topics, settings, strategies and available resources” 

HIV/AIDS and disability networking : summary report of survey consultation

CAMERON, Cathy
March 2010

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Recognising the importance of the connection between HIV and disability, this report aims to explore options for the development of a global network among the HIV/AIDS and disability fields in order to advance policy and program development. Through a survey consultation process, the report identifies and documents communication and collaborative activities that currently exist or are under development and provides recommendations to increase communication and collaboration. This report would be of interest to those working in the HIV/AIDS and disability fields

Capacity building in network organisations : experiences from and practical guidelines for HIV and other networks

SLUIJS-DOYLE, José
November 2009

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This report assesses seven capacities of organisations of people living with HIV and other HIV network organisations to see what makes a well-functioning network. These capacities are: involvement and accountability; partnership alliances; leadership; knowledge and skills; internal communication; impact, outputs and external communication; and management and finance. The report looks at four network organisations in Eastern and Southern Africa, with secondary research drawn from networks in Bangladesh, Nepal and India. The findings and recommendations cannot be applied universally to capacity strengthening in all network organisations, but need to be adapted to the context of each particular group

Mobile cell-phones (m-phones) in telemicroscopy : Increasing connectivity of isolated laboratories

BELLINA,Livia
EDUARDO, Missoni
June 2009

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This article analyses the development of modern information telecommunication (ITC) technology and its use in telemedicine by facilitating access to some diagnostic services. Images were taken without the use of an adaptor by simply approaching the lens of the mobile cell phone camera to the ocular of common optical microscopes, and subsequently sent via multimedia messaging services (MMS) to distant reference centres for tele-diagnosis. The study concludes that "the use of otherwise already widely available technologies, without any need for adaptors or otherwise additional technology, could significantly increase opportunities and quality diagnostics while lowering costs and considerably increasing connectivity between most isolated laboratories and distant reference center"
Diagnostic Pathology Vol 4, Issue 19

Disability rights and policies - reference documents and resources

CHERVIN, Phillippe
et al
January 2008

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This CD-ROM presents reference publications, web pages and websites selected in connection with the theme of disability rights and policies. The aim is to expand on the eight introductory chapters of the booklet. Each chapter provides both theoretical references to help clarify important concepts and approaches and resources that stem from practical experience to support project development and implementation

Electronic resource for media on HIV and AIDS

DAVIES, Jackie
July 2006

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The past two decades have seen the advent of two significant global developments: the spread of HIV and AIDS, and the creation of the Internet. Both of these factors have had a profound effect on many societies, and both are areas of conflict and controversy. An increasing number of media support organisations are using the Internet to provide information and training resources to media workers in developing countries. These electronic resources, or e-resources, are aimed at assisting media to produce effective communication about HIV and AIDS. But are e-resources relevant, how are they being developed and what factors need to be considered to ensure they are effective? This paper aims to explore these questions by examining the HIV and AIDS communication context for local media, and their information and communication needs. E-resources for HIV and AIDS communication are briefly outlined, and gaps and challenges identified; and finally conclusions and recommendations are presented

East African Network for Monitoring Antimalarial Treatment

February 2006

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The East African Network for Monitoring Antimalarial Treatment (EANMAT) is a local initiative to strengthen the regional information base on parasite chemosensitivity, on which rational treatment policy can be based. The Network was formed in 1997 with three countries: Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Rwanda joined in 2000 and Burundi in 2002. The network has high-level commitment and support from the Ministries of Health in the countries involved. EANMAT brings together representatives of the National Malaria Control Programmes (NMCPs) of the member countries, together with other operational and research expertise. This provides a dynamic assessment of current antimalarial treatment, and the data upon which policy change can be based. The website provides a seachable database of malaria treatment efficacy patterns, a map of sentinel sites where this data is gathered, the network's newsletter (including back issues), which comes out three times a year and includes articles about drug efficacy, recent research, and treatment programmes, and a fieldworkers' guide to in vivo anti-malarial drug efficacy testing

Soul City

January 2006

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The Soul City Institute for Health and Development Communication (SC IHDC) is a social change project which aims to impact on society at the individual, community and socio-political levels. SC IHDC is South Africa's premier edutainment project. The webiste includes details and publications about all major Soul City projects, including evaluation reports, advocacy material and training material

Telling stories, understanding lives, working toward change

COPLEY, Kath
HAYLOR, Graham
SAVAGE, William
December 2005

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This paper considers the importance of listening to people's stories when working towards improving the lives and livelihoods of individuals and communities. "Stories are helping us learn more about the livelihoods of the fishers and farmers with whom we work in eastern India. We are engaged with these communities in processes and activities aimed at improving their lives and promoting changes in government policy and service delivery in aquaculture and fisheries. Stories are told in several languages by women and men who fish and farm, about their lives, their livelihoods and significant changes they have experienced. We also record stories as narrated to us by colleague-informants. The written and spoken word, photographs, drawings and films - all are used to document the stories of people’s lives, sometimes prompted by questions as simple as 'What do people talk about in the village?' Through the power of language, stories can be an entry point into livelihoods programming, monitoring and evaluation, conflict transformation and ultimately a way of giving life to a rights-based approach to development"

networklearning.org

NETWORK LEARNING
December 2005

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This website aims to make high quality manuals, field books and training courses easily available to groups who need them (free of cost to those in the South but with a contribution of $25 requested from those in the North); to encourage colleagues to be open to new knowledge and skills, to plan and stick to self-guided learning; to introduce topics which may be new to some people an to link users to resources, useful organisations, websites and materials; and to provide a place for users working in different countries in the South to stay informed. The resources are available online and cover a variety of topics in a clear, easy to understand format. It provides a number of guidelines including guidelines for writing reports [http://www.networklearning.org/writing-reports.html] and a simple guide to the web [http://www.networklearning.org/web.html]

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