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Study on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq

NIJHOLT, Sarah
April 2019

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Handicap International (HI) commissioned a study on on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq. The overall objectives of the study were to:

  • Understand what explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes exist in Iraq;
  • Identify who is collecting such information, for which reasons and how it is being shared, and how it is being officially used;
  • Identify whether international victim data collection good practices and reporting standards are being followed up, and make concrete recommendations to help meet the standards;
  • Understand the successes, shortfalls, and challenges in data collection and information sharing;
  • Identify the needs of the data collection community in terms of ensuring sufficient victim reporting and data collection;
  • Identify if and how the data on victims is being collected and used by government authorities and the international fora.

 

Desk research was carried out and data collection took place in March 2019 in Erbil, Baghdad and Ninewa governorates in Iraq. In total, the qualitative researcher spent 3 days in Erbil, 4 days in Baghdad, and 6 days in Ninewa governorate to conduct interviews through a snowball approach. In total, 22 interviews were conducted with a variety of stakeholders, including humanitarian mine action actors, government officials, hospital directors, police and community leaders. This report provides an overview of the main findings.

Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal

BIBHAV Acharya
et al
January 2017

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Abstract

Background

Mental illnesses are the largest contributors to the global burden of non-communicable diseases. However, there is extremely limited access to high quality, culturally-sensitive, and contextually-appropriate mental healthcare services. This situation persists despite the availability of interventions with proven efficacy to improve patient outcomes. A partnerships network is necessary for successful program adaptation and implementation.

Partnerships network

We describe our partnerships network as a case example that addresses challenges in delivering mental healthcare and which can serve as a model for similar settings. Our perspectives are informed from integrating mental healthcare services within a rural public hospital in Nepal. Our approach includes training and supervising generalist health workers by off-site psychiatrists. This is made possible by complementing the strengths and weaknesses of the various groups involved: the public sector, a non-profit organization that provides general healthcare services and one that specializes in mental health, a community advisory board, academic centers in high- and low-income countries, and bicultural professionals from the diaspora community.

Conclusions

We propose a partnerships model to assist implementation of promising programs to expand access to mental healthcare in low- resource settings. We describe the success and limitations of our current partners in a mental health program in rural Nepal.

Humanitarian Hands on Tool (HHoT)

CBM
2017

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The CBM smartphone app 'Humanitarian Hands-on Tool' (HHoT) provides step-by-step guidance on how to implement an inclusive emergency response. With disability-inclusive humanitarian action broken down into individual task cards, which explain the basic 'how-to' details in simple language and images, this web-based tool and downloadable mobile app aims to become the ‘go-to’ field resource for all agencies planning humanitarian work that leaves no-one behind

Pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in complex contexts (Togo, Madagascar and Syria)

CONICAVE, Jerome
TAN, Daniele
2017

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In January-October 2016, Handicap International carried out a pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in Togo, Madagascar and Syria. The aim of the study was to explore and test how physical rehabilitation services can be more accessible to people living in complex contexts via innovative technologies (such as 3D printing, treatment processes that use Internet technology and tools) and decentralised services by bringing them closer to the patients. This scientific summary provides the context, the objectives, the methodology, the results of the study, and perspectives for the future.

A number of technical appendices are available

RS/05

AuthorAid

AUTHORAID
December 2015

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AuthorAid is a tool to help researchers in developing countries to network and further disseminate their work to a wider audience. The website contains links to find mentors/collaborators, a range of E-learning opportunities, funding opportunities for people working in developing countries, and a plethora of resources on topics ranging from how to write a grant proposal though to the publication process itself

The barefoot guide 4 : exploring the real work of social change

KLUGMAN, Barbara
et al
March 2015

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“This is a book about social change practices from many countries. It contains a variety of stories, analyses, and ideas, with many poems and illustrations to illuminate and enhance the text. For activists, civil society leaders, practitioners and students, this is not a book of easy answers, but one of experiences, learnings and questions, all asking “What is the real work of social change?”  The writers have not attempted to provide “best practice models”, but rather something to be learned from, to deepen our questions, and to be more thoughtful in our practice”

Disaster risk reduction through climate change adaptation : Incheon declaration, remap and action plan

NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, REPUBLIC OF KOREA
October 2010

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This conference report presents a summary of the agreements made during the fourth Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. The report contains a roadmap, agreed by the States in attendance, to establish climate resilient disaster risk management (DRM) systems that contribute to sustainable development at regional, national, sub national and community levels by 2015. This roadmap details a wide range of activities, including delivering training to key stakeholders, developing communication plans relating to disaster risk reduction, and the promotion of child- and people-centered education for community preparedness and risk reduction

The 4th Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

25-28 October 2010

Incheon, Republic of Korea

Capacity building in network organisations : experiences from and practical guidelines for HIV and other networks

SLUIJS-DOYLE, José
November 2009

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This report assesses seven capacities of organisations of people living with HIV and other HIV network organisations to see what makes a well-functioning network. These capacities are: involvement and accountability; partnership alliances; leadership; knowledge and skills; internal communication; impact, outputs and external communication; and management and finance. The report looks at four network organisations in Eastern and Southern Africa, with secondary research drawn from networks in Bangladesh, Nepal and India. The findings and recommendations cannot be applied universally to capacity strengthening in all network organisations, but need to be adapted to the context of each particular group

Change at hand : web 2.0 for development

ASHLEY, Holly
et al
June 2009

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There are dozens of emerging interactive web services and applications, sometimes referred to as the ‘participatory’, ‘social’ or ‘readwrite’ web, but more commonly known as Web 2.0. Together, they are radically changing the ways we create, share, collaborate and publish digital information through the Internet. These new technical opportunities bring challenges as well as opportunities that we need to understand and grasp. Most of the themed articles are based on presentations made at the the international Web2forDev conference, 25-27 September 2007 at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) headquarters in Rome, Italy

Tree of life

NCUBE-MLILO, Ncazelo
DENBOROUGH, David
2008

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The Tree of Life is a psychosocial support tool based on Narrative Practices. It is a tool that uses different parts of a tree as metaphors to represent the different aspects of our lives. The use of metaphors and carefully formulated questions invites children and others to tell stories about their lives in ways that make them stronger and more hopeful about the future. While it was not designed as a 'bereavement tool', it opens up space and has been used extensively with children in different contexts to facilitate conversations about loss and bereavement. The tool allows children severely affected by HIV and AIDS, poverty and conflict to tell, hear, and explore stories of loss without remaining trapped in expressions of grief and bereavement. It simultaneously opens up spaces and opportunities to tell, hear and explore stories of hope, shared values, connection to those around them as well as to those who have died. This resource takes facilitators through the different stages of the Tree of Life process

At the heart of change : the role of communication in sustainable development

WILSON, Mark
WARNOCK, Kitty
SCHOEMAKER, Emrys
2007

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This paper shows how information, communication, the media and ICTs are powerful agents of change, how they can give 'voice' to the poor and contribute to more sustainable development, but it also emphasises the need to support and strengthen communication processes used by poor and marginalised people who already face many barriers to receiving information, and to develop the skills and capacity of those people to make their own voices heard. It concludes by suggesting an agenda for action by policy makers, development experts, international organisations, non-governmental organisations and the private sector (including the media)

'The last thing the world needs is another website' : the role of evidence in integrating information and communication into development policy

PERKINS, Nicholas
Ed
October 2006

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This summary paper outlines the interim findings from the ICD (Information and Communication for Development) Knowledge Sharing and Learning programme. It summarises the communication processes that are needed to engage with policy makers in order to embed effective information and communication within their development policies and practice

Strengthening women's rights organizations through inclusion : lessons learned from the Gender, Disability and Development Institute

ROSENHEK, Sarah
September 2006

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Largely based on information gathered at the Mobility International (MI) USA's Gender, Disability and Development Institute (GDDI), this report asserts that inclusion of women with disabilities is not only feasible, but easy. This resource identifies how women's organisations can include disabled women in their work and ensure active participation. It explores a range of factors including; transport and accessibility, leadership opportunities; and participation. Useful for anyone with an interest in gender equality, disability and inclusion

Policy engagement for poverty reduction : how civil society can be more effective

COURT, Julius
June 2006

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This briefing paper draws on a report by Julius Court and others entitled 'Policy engagement: how can civil society be more effective', also published by ODI. It examines the role of civil society organisations in poverty reduction strategies and looks at ways to enhance their influence on the policy making process. Inadequate knowledge about the policy making process, lack of resources, insufficient capacity and policy makers' mistrust of CSOs are the main obstacles to their full engagement in policy making. Effective approaches should entail: campaigning and implementation of pilot projects aimed at improving adverse political contexts; rigorous mapping and assessment of political contexts; identify critical policy stages; provide relevant and objective evidence; use effective communication methods and strategies; apply network approaches; engage in systematic capacity building

Disaster preparedness for vulnerable populations : determining effective strategies for communicating risk, warning, and response

SULLIVAN, Helen T
HAKKINEN, Markku T
January 2006

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"Vulnerable populations, including those with disabilities, the elderly, the situationally disabled, and those with special needs are at particular risk in a disaster. Communicating preparedness and warning information is critical for these groups...This paper explores the challenges faced by vulnerable populations and discusses strategies that may prove effective in providing preparedness information to these groups. An ongoing project to develop accessible Tsunami preparedness information in Japan is described and the applicability of the results globally is discussed"

networklearning.org

NETWORK LEARNING
December 2005

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This website aims to make high quality manuals, field books and training courses easily available to groups who need them (free of cost to those in the South but with a contribution of $25 requested from those in the North); to encourage colleagues to be open to new knowledge and skills, to plan and stick to self-guided learning; to introduce topics which may be new to some people an to link users to resources, useful organisations, websites and materials; and to provide a place for users working in different countries in the South to stay informed. The resources are available online and cover a variety of topics in a clear, easy to understand format. It provides a number of guidelines including guidelines for writing reports [http://www.networklearning.org/writing-reports.html] and a simple guide to the web [http://www.networklearning.org/web.html]

ICTs : information and communication technologies for the poor

TORERO, Maximo
VON BRAUN, Joachim
November 2005

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This 'issue brief' describes the proliferation of electronically communicated information, which has accelerated economic and social change across all areas of human activity worldwide. It observes that the rapid growth of ICTs in developing countries is partly a result of very low initial access, and therefore in absolute terms developing countries are still well behind the developed world in access to ICTs. It concludes that ICTs offer an opportunity for development, but not a panacea. For the potential benefits of ICTs to be realized in developing countries, many prerequisites need to be put in place: prompt deregulation, effective competition among service providers, free movement and adoption of technologies, targeted and competitive subsidies to reduce the access gap, and institutional arrangements to increase the use of ICTs in the provision of public goods. The paper advocates for the importance of all three "Cs": connectivity, capability to use the new tools, and relevant content provided in accessible and useful forms

Themed sessions on ICTs for disaster relief

WORLD SUMMIT FOR THE INFORMATION SOCIETY
February 2005

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This webpage provides background information on a special themed meeting on the use of information and communication technologies for disaster relief. It includes links to relevant international conventions, useful documents and organisations working in this area

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