Resources search

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. Video gallery

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO). REGIONAL OFFICE FOR EUROPE
April 2020

Expand view

Several short videos concerning COVID-19 are available including:

  • Seven steps to prevent the spread of the virus
  • How to protect yourself against COVID-19
  • How is the new coronavirus affecting people who get it?
  • What is the correct way to wear and dispose of masks?
  • Why is it recommended to avoid close contact with anyone who has fever and cough?
  • Q&A on Coronavirus - COVID-19 in the workplace - WHO's Dr Rosamund Lewis

The impacts of COVID-19 on people with disabilities: a rapid review. Disability Inclusion Helpdesk Query No: 35

MEANIE-DAVIS, Jessie
LEE, Harri
CORBY, Nick
April 2020

Expand view

There is currently very limited data and evidence on the impacts of COVID-19 on people with disabilities and pre-existing health conditions, with no disability-disaggregated data on mortality rates available in the public sphere. However, reports from the media, disability advocates and disabled peoples’ organisations (DPOs) point to several emerging impacts, including primary and secondary impacts including on health, education, food security and livelihoods.  Most of the available data is from high income countries (HICs) though reports from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are likely to emerge. Evidence was gathered by a rapid desk based review. Gaps are identified. 

 

The section concerned with lessons drawn from similar epidemics draws heavily on lessons learned from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2016, and touches on lessons from the Zika outbreak in 2015-2016 and the SARS pandemic in the early 2000s.10 It also touches briefly on SARS, MERS and H1N1 (swine flu). 

 

Primary and secondary impacts of COVID-19 on people with disabilities are reviewed.


People with disabilities are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 not only because it can exacerbate underlying medical conditions, but because of attitudinal, environmental and institutional barriers to their participation in and benefit from the pandemic response. For example, inaccessible public health messaging and healthcare facilities, and stigma and discrimination.

Facts for life

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
et al
2010

Expand view

This resource consists of 14 chapters filled with practical information about how to ensure children’s rights to survival, growth, development and well-being. The topics address pregnancy, childbirth, major childhood illnesses, child development, early learning, parenting, protection, and care and support of children. The messages it contains are based on human rights, particularly the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The resource aims to provide families and communities with the information they need to save and improve the lives of children. Parents, grandparents, other caregivers and young people can refer to this practical source of information for answers to their questions related to childbearing and getting children off to the best start in life. The website includes a link to an interactive site for posting comments, sharing experiences and materials and discussing relevant issues

Child survival in sub-Saharan Africa : taking stock

SUPPORT FOR ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH IN AFRICA (SARA) PROJECT
2005

Expand view

This paper presents the findings and recommendations of research, funded by USAID, to understand better the growing gap between Africa and the rest of the world in achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals that relate to child health. It aims to provide an analysis of child health trends in order to identify how USAID could improve its contribution to improving child health in Africa

Facts for life

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2002

Expand view

A comprehensive guide aiming to provide parents and other caregivers with the information they need to save and improve children's lives. Presents information in non-technical language so it can be understood and acted upon easily by people who do not have a scientific background. Though mostly about the diseases, infections and other factors that can slow or hinder children's growth and development, it also includes a section on 'child development and early learning' which describes what children need to develop socially, emotionally, physically and intellectually

Facts for life

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2002

Expand view

This book aims to put lifesaving knowledge about children‘s health into the hands of those who need it most: parents, caregivers, health workers, government officials, journalists and teachers. This edition has updated information on safe motherhood, early childhood development, nutrition, HIV/AIDS and other major causes of childhood illnesses and death. In simple language, it emphasises practical, effective, low-cost ways of protecting children‘s lives and promoting their development

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates