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Gender equality and disability inclusion within water, sanitation and hygiene: exploring integrated approaches to addressing inequality

WATERAID
CBM AUSTRALIA
KILSBY, Di
et al
March 2017

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WaterAid, in collaboration with CBM Australia and Di Kilsby consulting have published a paper to examine the linkages, common approaches and learning in both areas. 

The discussion paper explores: 
• How the water, sanitation and hygiene sector can continue to improve practice on gender and disability
• How an integrated approach to the two intersectional issues of gender and disability help us to ‘do development better’

The discussion paper provides reflections on applying integrated gender and disability approaches to rights- based water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea.  
The paper is intended as a conversation starter for WASH program managers and other development practitioners looking to strengthen their conceptual and practical understanding of challenges and successes in integrating gender and disability in WASH and those looking to move towards more transformative and sustainable practice.

Projecting progress : reaching the SDGs by 2030

NICOLAI, Susan
et al
September 2015

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The report presents an analysis that begins to systematically quantify the scale of the challenge that the world has set itself with the Sustainable Development Goals for the first time.  The authors selected one target per goal – a total of 17 – and projected forward to 2030, grading them from A-F according to how near they will be to completion in 2030. This was based on available projections of current trends sourced from leading institutions, alongside our own where there were gaps. The resulting scorecard shows that unless significant changes are made, none of the SDGs will be met

Up-scaling pro-poor ICT policies and practices

GERSTER, Richard
ZIMMERMANN, Sonja
February 2005

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This paper is the result of a literature review and discussions during a two-day workshop. It examines how ICT can make a difference in reducing poverty and reaching the MDGs. This potential contrasts, however, with the relatively modest pro-poor ICT implementation level. It asks what key barriers impede the implementation of declarations, and how can we multiply, upscale and replicate successful pilot projects. This study idenfies four "basic requirements" for successful up-scaling of poverty reduction through ICTs: an enabling ICT policy environment; a high priority assigned to ICT for poverty reduction; appropriate technology choices; and mobilisation of additional public and private resources

Autonomy or dependence? North-south NGO partnerships

BREHM, Vicky Mancuso
July 2004

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This paper describes research undertaken by INTRAC into the relationships between northern and southern NGOs working in partnership. It summarises European and southern perspectives on partnership based on research and three case studies, and draws out the key themes. It concludes with some recommendations, especially around funding, accountability/transparency, and working together as organisations rather than pairings of individuals or departments

Promoting the application of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. UNCTAD
April 2004

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This paper places ICT in a broad perspective of science and technology. The report seeks to identify approaches for the effective promotion and use of science and technology to meet the development goals contained in the Millennium Declaration (MDGs). It particularly emphasises that academia/government/industry partnerships are essential in order to build scientific and technological capabilities and to foster market-oriented policies and developments; and that access to new and emerging technologies is imperative

Participation, relationships and dynamic change : new thinking on evaluating the work of international networks

CHURCH, Madeline
et al
2003

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Gives an overview discussion of the key characteristics of networks, noting that international development increasingly takes a network form. Networks typically put an emphasis on: facilitative leadership; building relationships and trust; light co-ordinating structure that allows decentralisation, autonomy and voluntary participation. However, these are charactersitics that traditional evaluation approaches have not been developed to address. Provides a useful check-list for evaluating networks and suggests some useful practical tools to approach the evaluation of networks, such as: ‘Contributions assessment’ to guage how effectively the network facilitates the circulation of resources, and enables people to make the contribution that they are capable of; ‘Clarification of aims and activities’ (adapted Weaver’s Triangle) tool to clarify how participants perspectives and activities diverge or converge over time; ‘Channels of Participation’ tool to assess how and were members interact in a network and look at changes over time; ‘Monitoring the edges’ to track independent networking stimulated but not through the centre

Mental health legislation and human rights : mental health policy and service guidance package

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2003

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"Mental health legislation is essential for protecting the rights of people with mental disorders, who comprise a vulnerable section of society. This module provides information to help guide the development of mental health legislation. The module begins by setting out the activities that are required before legislation is formulated. The content of legislation is then described, including substantive provisions for specific mental health legislation and substantive provisions for other legislation impacting on mental health. Process issues in mental health legislation are then outlined, including drafting procedures, consultation and the implementation of legislation"
Note: This module is part of the WHO Mental Health Policy and Service Guidance Package. The package consists of a series of interrelated user-friendly modules designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in policy development and service planning. Each module addresses a core aspect of mental health

The poverty of partnerships

TAYLOR, James
2002

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Discusses the term 'partnership' and its usage in development agencies. Contends that the term is overused with no regard for the centrality of building truly interdependent relationships to the process of development

Multi-stakeholder processes for governance and sustainability : beyond deadlock and conflict

HEMMATI, Minu
et al
2002

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"This book is about how people and organisations from very different backgrounds can work together in an increasingly complex political, social and economic environment.... "[It] puts forward a framework for designing multi-stakeholder processes (MSPs), aiming to contribute to the advancement of such mechanisms as will produce practical solutions. MSPs seem a promising path, both around (inter)governmental processes and independent of them"

Cultures, spirituality and development

WORLD FAITHS DEVELOPMENT DIALOGUE (WFDD)
2001

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This booklet puts forward the point of view that development processes are only successful if they take into consideration the cultural and spiritual dimensions of people's lives. Drawing on examples from different parts of the world, it discusses what this means in practice and suggests how it may be done. It includes sections on development paradigms and the relevance of inclusive, participatory approaches; the relevance of culture; ideas toward a 'code of conduct' or way of working with culture in development; and raises methodological issues. The aim is to open up a debate about issues which have often been ignored because of their intangible and sometimes sensitive nature

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