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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

The world development report 2012 : jobs

THE WORLD BANK
2012

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This report "takes the centrality of jobs in the development process as its starting point and challenges and re-frames how we think about work. Adopting a cross-sectorial and multi-disciplinary approach, the Report looks at why some jobs do more for development than others. The Report finds that the jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, foster trust and civic engagement, or reduce poverty. Critically, these jobs are not only found in the formal sector; depending on the country context, informal jobs can also be transformational"...The Report advances a three-stage approach to help governments meet these objectives. First, policy fundamentals "including macroeconomic stability, an enabling business environment, investments in human capital, and the rule of law" are essential for both growth and job creation. Second, well-designed labour policies can help ensure that growth translates into employment opportunities, but they need to be complemented by a broader approach to job creation that looks beyond the labor market. Third, governments should strategically identify which jobs would do the most for development given their specific country context, and remove or offset the obstacles that prevent the private sector from creating more of those jobs
Note: Links are provided to full document and separate files containing the messages, overview, each chapter and statistical annex

Feeding and nutrition of infants and young children : guidelines for the WHO European Region, with emphasis on the former Soviet countries

MICHAELSEN, Kim Fleischer
2000

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This publication contains the scientific rationale for the development of national nutrition and feeding recommendations from birth to the age of three years, and provides information that will help national experts to develop or update their current national feeding recommendations. It will also interest ministries of health, paediatricians, dieticians, nutrition scientists and public health and other health professionals concerned with nutrition and the health of young children

The pursuit of global health : the relevance of engagement for developed countries

HOWSON, Christopher P
FINEBERG, Harvey V
BLOOM, Barry R
1988

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The globalisation of the world economy and the consequent increase in commerce, travel, and communication have brought benefits to virtually every country. But these changes also bring risks that cannot be addressed adequately within traditional national borders. These risks include emerging infectious diseases, resulting in part from increased prevalence of drug-resistant pathogens; exposure to dangerous substances, such as contaminated foodstuffs, and banned and toxic substances; and violence, including chemical and bioterrorist attack. By investing in global health, industrliased countries will not only benefit populations in desperate and immediate need of assistance, but also themselves--through protecting their people, improving their economies, and advancing their international interests. This paper describes the rationale for involvement of industrialised countries in global health, and suggests a means for its coordination.

Go-between

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Provides information on the UN's work in development and health, on UN-NGO cooperation, and the activities of NGOs and their participation in the work of the UN
2-3 times a year
Free online

Alertnet

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This news network provides in depth coverage of emerging and current global health issues, natural disasters, war and conflict, and food crises. It also has sections on climate change, country profiles, multimedia, blogs of opinion and eye witness reports and an area for aid agencies who are members of AlertNet

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