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Making the future of work inclusive of people with disabilities

ILO GLOBAL BUSINESS AND DISABILITY NETWORK
FUNDACION ONCE
November 2019

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This is a first exercise to connect different areas of debate, looking at the key trends of the future of work from a disability perspective and seeking to identify specific action needed in order to shape the future of work in a more disability-inclusive way.

Chapters include: Work and disability - overview of current situation; megatrends of future work and persons with disability (technological revolution, skills revolution, cultutral change, demographic change and climate change); and Roadmap for an inclusive future of work.

 

The following five key objectives for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the future of work have been identified:

1. New forms of employment and employment relations integrate disability inclusion

2. Skills development and life-long learning made inclusive of persons with disabilities

3. Universal Design embedded in development of all new infrastructure, products and services

4. Assistive technologies, existing and newly developed, to be made affordable and available

5. Measures to include persons with disabilities in growing and developing areas of the economy

 

Governments, companies, disability NGOs, trade unions and academia must be encouraged to commit and contribute towards achieving these objectives through different actions. An inclusive future of work can be reached through coordination and alliances among the different stakeholders

Guidelines on best practice for persons living with deafblindness

ZWANENBURG, Aline
TESNI, Sian
June 2019

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These guidelines were developed to advance understanding of the needs and challenges of persons living with deafblindness and to promote their inclusion in society. The target audience are members of the CBM Federation with particular interest to, among others staff at Regional and Country Offices, Member Associations, co-workers, partners (including governments, education agencies, public and private service providers, and professionals), as well as persons living with deafblindness and their families.

 

Part One gives an overview of the impact deafblindness can have on an individual’s development and learning. It emphasises the need for a continuum of services and programmes, including early detection, referral, educational input, and family support.

 

Part Two outlines components of education and rehabilitation programmes. It provides guidelines on communication, holistic assessment procedures, assistive devices, advocacy and self-determination, transition planning, and discusses the importance of on-going regular access to health and therapeutic services.

 

Part Three considers how to improve and expand existing services through the provision of on-going personnel capacity building, and through networking with key stakeholders, to consider intersecting issues and service expansion. Each section includes an overview of the topic explored, some case studies and considerations for service implementation.

Health economic evaluation in orthotics and prosthetics: a systematic review protocol

CLARKE, Leigh
DILLON, Michael
SHIEL, Alan
June 2019

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The aim of this systematic review is to critically appraise the existing orthotic/prosthetic health economic evaluation literature and therefore determine evidence gaps, critical method design issues and the extent to which the literature informs orthotic/prosthetic policy and investment decisions

 

Systematic Reviews volume 8, Article number: 152 (2019)

doi:10.1186/s13643-019-1066-9

 

 

Disability-themed emojis approved for use

British Broadcasting Company (BBC)
February 2019

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New accessibility-themed emojis including characters with hearing aids, wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, white "probing" canes and guide dogs are to be introduced.

Their inclusion in 2019's official list means many smartphones should gain them in the second half of the year

Assistive technology

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
May 2018

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A brief introduction to facts behind the global unmet need for assistive technology and the WHO response in coordination the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE).

Digital Accessibility Toolkit

CBM
May 2018

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The purpose of this toolkit is to share a selection of tools and recommendations pertaining to the accessibility of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Based on international standards and a scan of available technologies, these tools and recommendations are intended to contribute to the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities by ensuring that information is equitably accessible.

The goals of this toolkit are:

  • To outline the key international frameworks around digital accessibility and why it is critical for inclusion of persons with disabilities.
  • To link people with tools, practice examples, free online training, and other resources so that their practice is digitally accessible.
  • To ensure that digital accessibility is an inherent aspect of daily practice.
  • To align the practices of those working with and for CBM. 

This toolkit is intended to be used as a guide and practice resource by people working with and for CBM so that we produce accessible digital content and communications, and place accessibility at the centre of our ICT procurement processes. We hope that the toolkit will be a resource for the wider community of persons with disabilities, Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs), and nongovernmental organisations (NGOs).

Assistive technology and people: a position paper from the first global research, innovation and education on assistive technology (GREAT) summit

DESMOND, Deirdre
et al
May 2018

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"Assistive technology (AT) is a powerful enabler of participation. The World Health Organization’s Global Collaboration on Assistive Technology (GATE) programme is actively working towards access to assistive technology for all. Developed through collaborative work as a part of the Global Research, Innovation and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit, this position paper provides a “state of the science” view of AT users, conceptualized as “People” within the set of GATE strategic “P”s. 

Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology 
Volume 13, 2018 - Issue 5: Position Papers from the First Global Research, Innovation, and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit

This issue has 7 papers from the GREAT summit

https://doi.org/10.1080/17483107.2018.1471169

Assistive technologies in developing countries

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
March 2018

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This rapid review looks at examples of existing literature on the availability of assistive technologies and efforts to make these technologies more affordable and accessible in developing countries. Needs and access to assistive technologies are overviewed. The discussion of market characteristics of assistive technologies covers availability, affordability, quality, appropriate design, and awareness and demand.  Efforts to increase the affordability and accessibility of assistive technology are discussed covering: The Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE); the WHO Priority Assistive Products List; and EYElliance and eye health initiatives. Market shaping and community based approaches are discussed in this context.

 

This is a K4D helpdesk report. This report was commissioned by the UK Department for International Development (DFID)

Addressing the rising prevalence of hearing loss

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
February 2018

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Hearing loss is the fourth highest cause of disability globally, with an estimated annual cost of over 750 billion dollars. These facts are well known and have contributed to growing global consciousness on the need for accessible hearing care in all regions of the world. Looking forward however, the demand for hearing care is likely to grow significantly in coming decades. This report highlights the potential escalation of hearing loss to the middle of the century, and focusses on the factors responsible for hearing loss and the means to address them. 

WHO estimates in 2008 found that 360 million people worldwide live with disabling hearing loss, including 32 million children and 180 million older adults. The most recent estimations place this figure at over 466 million people with disabling hearing loss in 2018. The main areas of the world affected by disabling hearing loss are the South Asian, Asia Pacific and Sub-Saharan African regions, with a prevalence rate almost four times that of the high income regions.

 

Measures to address these concerns deal with: prevention of infections in mothers and babies; chronic ear infections; noise exposure; and ototoxic hearing loss.

 

Public health aspects are highlighted. 

Wheelchair Service Provision Course

LOWE, Rachel
RAU, Barbara
2018

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This MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) aims to provide a basic theoretical understanding of wheelchair mobility and to develop an understanding of the theoretical principles, skills and knowledge underlying the management skills and knowledge in the management of wheelchair service delivery.  Starting on 3 September 2018 and lasting for 4 weeks, it will involve around 4-6 hours of work each week (depending on your learning style)

This course is aimed at Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy professionals, clinicians, students and assistants. It will introduce the role of the wheelchair in mobility, explore assessment and the roles of the multidisciplinary team in wheelchair service delivery, as well as provide a theoretical understanding of management techniques and related clinical considerations. It will not teach practical skills or lead to any clinical qualification. 

 

Hearing aid systems in low-resource settings (Community Ear & Hearing Health, vol.15, no.19, 2018)

RICARD, Paddy
Ed
2018

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Articles in this issue are:

  • Hearing aid systems in low-resource settings
  • How hearing aids work and how to take care of them
  • The impact of hearing aid use in low and middle-income countries
  • Barriers to the use of hearing aid systems in low-and middle-income countries
  • Beyond devices: what to consider when providing hearing aids in LMICs
  • Improving access to hearing care and hearing rehabilitation in the Philippines
     

New sign language new(S): the globalization of sign language in the smartphone era

TANNENBAUM-BARUCHI, Caroline
FEDER-BUBIS, Paula
October 2017

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"Languages are dynamic and change over the years. Changes in sign languages have been usually initiated to accommodate the needs of the local Deaf community. With the increase in smartphone use, sign languages are influenced not only by the local Deaf community, but also by foreign Deaf people on the other side of the screen, regardless of their location. Smartphones influence the sign language itself and the Deaf community by connecting different communities of Deaf people through messages, shared information and experiences, and news delivery. The popularity of this technology among Deaf communities is a social phenomenon emerging from Deaf people themselves. Smartphones may promote the globalization of sign language, shortening distances between Deaf communities around the world"

Disability & Society, Volume 33, 2018 - Issue 2

The Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning physical rehabilitation services

PRYOR, Wesley
SMITH, Fleur
April 2017

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Ensuring quality and affordable rehabilitation services to anyone in need is at the heart of Handicap International mandate and strategy. The organisation is implementing physical rehabilitation projects in 40 countries,  The Rehabilitation Management System was initially developed to allow for more effective and reliable analysis of the quality of rehabilitation services in low resource countries. It draws on international standards, consensus and evidence and it is made of a set of scorecards that are used to monitor key components of management and support service planning. The initial instrument went through several participatory revisions and has been now implemented by Handicap International partners for about 6 years. While it covers domains that are specific to rehabilitation services, it is aligned to the broader health system strengthening framework. It is currently used in around 14 physical rehabilitation centers in 8 countries where settings and governance systems considerably vary, reflecting the different stages of development of physical rehabilitation services worldwide.

The “Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning Physical Rehabilitation services” guide follows the revision of the RMS scorecards, as a response to the demand from partner organisations, programmes and the Handicap International’s Rehabilitation Technical Unit for a greater adaptability of the system. It is hoped that this guide will further assist partners and programmes in implementing the RMS in effective and strategic management of their services in order to provide the highest quality care in the most sustainable manner.

School and classroom disabilities inclusion guide for low- and middle-income countries

BULAT, Jennae
HAYES, Anne
et al
January 2017

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This guide provides strategies and recommendations for developing inclusive classrooms and schools. We specifically address the needs of Sub-Saharan African countries, which lack the resources for implementing inclusive education. However, our strategies and recommendations can be equally useful in other contexts where inclusive education practices have not yet been adopted. Strategies for enhancing existing school and classroom environment and instruction include: modify the physical environment; modify classroom managment strategies; ensure social inclusion; adopt best instructional practices; apply strategies for students with sensory disabilities; and use assistive technologies. Strategies for adopting response to intervention include: tier by tier implementation; individualised education plans; and planning for school wide adoption of inclusive practices and a multilevel system of support.

 

 

Rehabilitation in health systems

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2017

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This document provides evidence-based, expert-informed recommendations and good practice statements to support health systems and stakeholders in strengthening and extending high-quality rehabilitation services so that they can better respond to the needs of populations. The recommendations are intended for government leaders and health policy-makers and are also relevant for sectors such as workforce and training. The recommendations and good practice statements may also be useful for people involved in rehabilitation research, service delivery, financing and assistive products, including professional organisations, academic institutions, civil society and nongovernmental and international organisations. The recommendations focus solely on rehabilitation in the context of health systems. They address the elements of service delivery and financing specifically. The recommendations were developed according to standard WHO procedures, detailed in the WHO handbook for guideline development

Standards for prosthetics and orthotics

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2017

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This document provides a set of standards and a manual for implementation to support countries in developing or improving high-quality, affordable prosthetics and orthotics services. Its aim is to ensure that prosthetics and orthotics services are people-centred and responsive to every individual’s personal and environmental needs. Implementation of these standards will support Member States in fulfilling their obligations under the CRPD and in meeting the SDGs, in particular Goal 3. With these standards, any government can develop national policies, plans and programmes for prosthetics and orthotics services of the highest standard. This document has two parts: the standards and an implementation manual. Both parts cover four areas of the health system:

• policy (governance, financing and information);

• products (prostheses and orthoses);

• personnel (workforce);

• provision of services

Priority assistive products list

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
May 2016

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The Priority Assistive Products List (APL) aspires to follow in the footsteps of the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, which creates awareness among the public, mobilises resources and stimulates competition. The Priority Assistive Products List is similarly intended to be a catalyst in promoting access to assistive technology. It is not a restrictive list but aims to provide each Member State with a model from which to develop a National priority assistive products list. 

The List includes hearing aids, wheelchairs, communication aids, spectacles, artificial limbs, pill organizers, memory aids and other essential items for many older people and people with disabilities to be able to live a healthy, productive and dignified life.

The APL is part of the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE)

Google & Motivation collaboration

MOTIVATION
April 2016

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A 24 month collaboration between Google.org and Motivation to develop and test a model for using 3D printing to create customised postural support devices to enable wheelchairs to be adapted and fitted to the unique needs of the wheelchair user is announced. An integral part of the project is the piloting of a ‘Print Pod’ overseas, which will act as a temporary wheelchair clinic, kitted out with a 3D printer and raw material.

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