Resources search

Sommet Mondial sur le Handicap +2 Ans: Les Progrès dans la Mise en Oeuvre des Engagements [World Summit on Disability +2 Years: Progress in the Implementation of the Commitments]

GLOBAL DISABILITY SUMMIT
March 2021

Expand view


The 2018 World Disability Summit, held in London, was intended to spark a new wave in the disability rights movement.

The 2-year GDS + report presents critical information on the progress made by national governments, multilateral agencies, donors, foundations, and private sector and civil society organizations on the nearly 1,000 commitments adopted in 2018.
 

How do legal and policy frameworks support employment of people with disabilities in Uganda? Findings from a qualitative policy analysis study

GRIFFITHS, Andrew
BECHANGE, Stevens
LORYMAN, Hannah
IGA, Chris
SCHMIDT, Eleanor
August 2020

Expand view

This policy analysis reviewed the current legislation and policies on the economic empowerment of people with disabilities in Uganda and explored the views of national stakeholders on the implementation of these policies in practice. The analysis was conducted through a document review and in‐depth stakeholder interviews. The study found that anti‐discrimination policies can only do so much for disability inclusive recruitment. Questions about policy implementation, stakeholder ownership, trust and efficiencies within the system and sufficient accountability mechanisms need addressing, if the existing framework is to be effective and positively impact the lives of people with disabilities in Uganda.
 

https://doi.org/10.1002/jid.3508


Journal of International Development J. Int. Dev. 32, 1360–1378 (2020J

Disability Inclusion Matters: Including persons with disabilities in the promotion of good governance

SCHMIDT, Bettina
Ed
April 2019

Expand view

In the past nine years, the GIZ Sector Project ‘Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities’ has been supporting more than 30 programmes worldwide to include persons with disabilities in our efforts to improve good governance. This publication consolidates lessons learnt and offers guidance and tools around how to address disability in governance programming

India’s Disability Policy – Analysis of Core Concepts of Human Rights

O'DOWD, J
MANNAN, H
MCVEIGH, J
2014

Expand view

Purpose: To analyse India’s National Policy for Persons with Disabilities (2006), using a Human Rights approach.

 

Method: A framework analysis was carried out using EquiFrame, which analyses policies for inclusion and quality of Core Concepts of Human Rights and inclusion of Vulnerable Groups.

 

Results: India’s National Policy for Persons with Disabilities scored 67% for Core Concept Coverage, 24% for Core Concept Quality and 42% for Vulnerable Group Coverage. This gave the policy an overall ranking of Low quality.

 

Conclusions: The current policy for persons living with disabilities in India would benefit from being updated to encompass the Core Concepts of Human Rights.

Human Rights, Social Inclusion and Health Equity in International Donors' Policies

Eide, A H
Amin, M
MacLachlan, M
Mannan, H
Schneider, M
2013

Expand view

Background: Health policies have the potential to be important instruments in achieving equity in health. A framework – EquiFrame - for assessing the extent to which health policies promote equity was used to perform an equity audit of the health policies of three international aid organizations.

 

Objective: To assess the extent to which social inclusion and human rights feature in the health policies of DFID (UK), Irish Aid, and NORAD (Norway).

 

Method: EquiFrame provides a tool for analyzing equity and quality of health policies with regards to social inclusion and human rights. Each health policy was analyzed with regards to the frequency and content of a predefined set ofVulnerable Groups and Core Concepts.

 

Results: The three policies vary but are all relatively weak with regards to social inclusion and human rights issues as defined in EquiFrame. The needs and rights of vulnerable groups for adequate health services are largely not addressed.

 

Conclusion: In order to enhance a social inclusion and human rights perspective that will promote equity in health through more equitable health policies, it is suggested that EquiFrame can be used to guide the revision and development of the health policies of international organizations, aid agencies and bilateral donors in the future.

 

Limitations: Analyses are limited to “policy on the books” and does not measure how effectively vulnerable groups are included in mainstream health policy work.

E-bulletin