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Removing barriers - The path towards inclusive access. Disability assessment among Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon. Jordan report

ASAI, Yahoko
et al
July 2018

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Humanity & Inclusion (HI) and iMMAP conducted a study concerning with the lack of disability data in the Syria crisis context,  which aimed to:

  • Provide statistically reliable prevalence of disability as well as disability disaggregated data indicators on access to services.
  • Increase understanding of the situation of Syrian refugees with disabilities and their households, compared to their peers without disabilities, in relation to the access to services including education, and key barriers experienced in accessing these services.
  • Recommend inclusive actions to be prioritized by humanitarian actors.

The study conducted a literature review, quantitative data collection as well as qualitative data collection. Quantitative data was collected from 6,381 persons of randomly sampled 1,159 households in Azraq and Zaatari camps and Irbid between October 2017 and January 2018. Twenty-five Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and 3 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were also conducted between November 2017 and January 2018 to elicit deeper insights on the educational situation of children with and without disabilities

Removing barriers - The path towards inclusive access. Disability assessment among Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon. Lebanon report

ASAI, Yahoko
et al
July 2018

Expand view

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) and iMMAP conducted a study concerned with the lack of disability data in the Syria crisis context,  which aimed to:

  • Provide statistically reliable prevalence of disability as well as disability disaggregated data indicators on access to services.
  • Increase understanding of the situation of Syrian refugees with disabilities and their households, compared to their peers without disabilities, in relation to the access to services including education, and key barriers experienced in accessing these services.
  • Recommend inclusive actions to be prioritized by humanitarian actors.

The study conducted a literature review, quantitative data collection as well as qualitative data collection. Quantitative data was collected from 2,495 persons of randomly sampled 506 households in the urban setting in Bar Elias as well as Informal Tented Settlements (ITS) in Bar Elias and Arsal in December 2017. Fourteen Key Informant Interviews (KII) were also conducted in December 2017 to elicit deeper insights on the educational situation of children with and without disabilities.

Inclusive and safe urban mobility and Disaster Risk Management in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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Disabled people are disproportionately affected by disasters owing to mobility difficulties in evacuation, lack of access to information or services and discrimination. When disasters occur, constraining external factors, such as unsafe roads and lack of accessible pedestrian and transport routes, create additional difficulties for coping with the situation. Developing cities vulnerable to disasters also are likely to have a greater proportion of the population with a disability, due to past injuries.

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility challenges relating to disasters discussed include: inaccessible disaster shelters, inaccessible means of evacuation and lack of information.

 

Case histories provided are: Building back better in Haiti; a focus on inclusive access and mobility; and Improving universal accessibility in Kathmandu, Nepal

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Report on the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities (CRPD) by the European Union

THE EUROPEAN UNION
June 2014

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This report covers the period of the entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) for the European Union (EU)  in January 2011 to December 2013. It begins with a brief introduction to the institutions of the EU, and some key legal and structural information. The report then focuses on the key articles of the CRPD (articles 1 to 33) and provides details on the EU's strategy towards implementation, including discussion of the measures taken, and information on the relevant EU legislation. This report would be particularly useful to anyone interested in understanding how the EU has implemented the CRPD so far

Commission Staff Working Document

Brussels, 5.6.2014 , SWD(2014) 182 final

World youth report 2003 : the global situation of young people

UNITED NATIONS. Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Ed
2004

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Overall, young people today are better off than previous generations, but many are still severely hindered by a lack of education, poverty, health risks, unemployment and the impact of conflict. The World Youth Report 2003 provides an overview of the global situation of young people. The first ten chapters focus on the priority areas of education, employment, extreme poverty, health issues, the environment, drugs, delinquency, leisure time, the situation of girls and young women, and youth participation in decision-making as identified by the World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) adopted by the General Assembly in 1995. The remaining five chapters address some of the newer issues that were later identified as additional priorities for youth and were adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2003

Providing low-cost ICT access to low-income communities in developing countries : what works? what pays?

CASPREY, G
O'CONNOR, D
2003

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This Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development report discusses the potential of and need for telecommunications development in rural areas of low-income countries. It outlines the main challenges, and describes sustainable options. The report also reviews low-cost options and summarizes policies that would support the more rapid diffusion especially telecommunications reform

Strengthening local capacities to create and adapt healthcare information

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
October 2002

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The key messages of this report centre around the current global information explosion and its limited impact on access to relevant, practical information for healthcare providers in developing countries, who continue to lack access to the basic information they need. Relevance and reliability are paramount in meeting health information needs. Local 'health information providers' (publishers, libraries, NGOs, Ministries of Health) are best placed to provide content for local 'end users'. The effectiveness of the international 'health information community' is dependent on its ability to facilitate the expression of local knowledge and experience, and to promote dialogue and exchange among local providers and end users. Local producers and end users must be involved from the earliest stages in dialogue, priority-setting, problem-solving, creative thinking, and generation of plans for action. Creation and adaptation of local content requires access to a wide range of existing source materials, both internationally and nationally. Creation and adaptation of local content is resource-intensive and requires the full range of skills, including medical knowledge, knowledge of end-users needs, and writing and editorial skills. Traditional knowledge and 'scientific' knowledge are mutually reinforcing and can be combined in ways that enhance the quality and coverage of healthcare in developing countries. ICTs present new opportunities to enhance the above processes

Using ICTs to generate development content

BATCHELOR, Simon
October 2002

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This report examines how information can be packaged and communicated so that it reflects the context of the reciever. It stresses that communication and information provision is a process like any other in development, and ICTs should be seen as tools to improve livelihoods, and not an end in and of themselves. It reviews recent research on the types of information demanded by communities, and emphasises the importance of visual content for including non- and semi-literate people. The paper outlines then key elements required in any planned content production, especially by NGOs or governments. A final comment is made on intellectual property rights (IPR)

Collecting and propagating local development content : synthesis and conclusions

BALLANTYNE, Peter
May 2002

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Drawing from a consultation process to examine how local content in developing countries is created, adapted, and exchanged, this report provides some answers to these questions. It is a synthesis of lessons; the case stories which are reproduced in an accompanying report provide details on actual experienses and lessons from the ground

HIV/AIDS and children affected by armed conflict

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2001

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This publication addresses the issue of how to incorporate HIV prevention and care into routine responses to complex humanitarian emergencies. It considers evidence that conflict facilitates the spread of HIV and also inhibits responses to HIV/AIDS. It reviews interventions carried out at international and national levels by UNICEF, other UN agencies and non-governmental organizations. Lessons learned are discussed and recommendations are given for UNICEF’s role in reducing the spread of HIV in situations of armed conflict

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