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Analysis : how to make disasters less deadly for the disabled

INTEGRATED REGIONAL INFORMATION NETWORKS (IRIN)
September 2013

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This article highlights research that has shown that in disasters, people with disabilities are among the most vulnerable. If their impairment affects their ability to move or communicate, they are not only at greater risk of death, injury and isolation, but may also struggle to access humanitarian assistance and information about relief services available. In addition, communities and governments lack information about the needs and capacities of persons with disabilities, and therefore frequently exclude them from disaster plans and protocols.  The paper aims to assist initiatives that enable people with disabilities in disaster to understand ways of becoming more “resilient” as well as proposing risk reduction practices and services

Improved and standardized method for assessing years lived with disability after injury

HAAGSMA, JA
et al
2012

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"This article presents the results of study that aimed to develop a standardized method for calculating years lived with disability (YLD) after injury. The method developed consists of obtaining data on injury cases seen in emergency departments as well as injury-related hospital admissions, using the EUROCOST system to link the injury cases to disability information and employing empirical data to describe functional outcomes in injured patients. The novel method for calculating YLD after injury can be applied in different settings, overcomes some limitations of the method used to calculate the global burden of disease, and allows more accurate estimates of the population burden of injury"
Bull World Health Organ, 90

Disability and displacement

REFUGEE STUDIES CENTRE, UINVERSITY OF OXFORD
July 2010

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The 27 feature theme articles in this issue of Forced Migration Reveiw show why disabled people who have been displaced need particular consideration and highlight some of the initiatives taken (locally and at the global level) to change thinking and practices, so that their vulnerability is recognised, their voices heard, and responses are inclusive

Lancet Neonatal Survival Series

2005

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The goal of the Lancet Neonatal Survival Series is to provide information that will affect policy globally. The papers also provide a framework for practical action in countries so that these interventions reach families in greatest need. New information is given regarding critical factors related to neonatal deaths, where and why newborns die and assessments of the effectiveness and costs of interventions for newborn care. Practical steps are given to strengthen health care now in countries such as Ethiopia where 135,000 babies die every year, yet only five percent of women have a skilled care attendant during childbirth

Séminaire national d'information et d'échange sur l'utilisation des NTIC dans le domaine de la santé

DIAKITE, Filifing
September 2004

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An article giving a survey of a seminar organised by the network ToguNet (ICTs stakeholders' network in Mali) with support from the International Institute for Communication and Development (IICD). Attending this national meeting were those in charge of the administration of health, the private sector, health community centres and ToguNet members.Various presentations were given on the use of ICT in the health sector in Mali

Ensuring the rights of indigenous children

MILLER, Michael
February 2004

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This Digest details how the rights of indigenous children in both rural and urban areas are often compromised or denied. Specific areas of concern include the rights of indigenous children to survival and development, to good health, to education that respects their cultural identity, to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation, and participation in decision-making processes relevant to their lives. At the same time, however, indigenous children possess special resources as custodians of a multitude of cultures, languages, beliefs and knowledge systems. As this Digest discusses, the most effective initiatives to promote the rights of indigenous children build upon these very elements. Such initiatives recognize the inherent strength of indigenous communities, families and children, respect their dignity and give them full voice in all matters that affect them. The child age group in this report is from 0 - 18, with some areas that focus on early childhood development. For example, the right to birth registration, a name and nationality (p 9), or intercultural initiatives for safe childbirth in Peru (p 15)

Birth registration : right from the start

INNOCENTI RESEARCH CENTRE, UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
March 2002

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This Digest looks at birth registration -- a fundamental human right that opens the door to other rights, including education and health care, participation and protection. Unregistered children are often the children of the poor and excluded, such as refugees or particular indigenous groups. Lack of registration exacerbates their poverty and underscores their marginalisation. Non-registration also has serious implications for national goverments. Countries need to know how many people they have and how many there are likely to be in the future, in order to plan effectively. This Digest emphasizes the crucial importance of birth registration, explores the obstacles to universal registration and highlights the actions -- including awareness raising, legislative changes, resource allocation and capacity building -- that are needed to ensure the registration of every child

Breast cancer in south-east Republic of Yemen

ABDUL HAMID, G
TAYEB, M S
BAWAZIR, A A
November 2001

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This retrospective study of breast cancer was carried out using the treatment registry of Aden Health Office and archives of Al-Gamhoria Teaching Hospital. It advocates for a comprehensive national approach to increase research funding in this area

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