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Hearing aid systems in low-resource settings (Community Ear & Hearing Health, vol.15, no.19, 2018)

RICARD, Paddy
Ed
2018

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Articles in this issue are:

  • Hearing aid systems in low-resource settings
  • How hearing aids work and how to take care of them
  • The impact of hearing aid use in low and middle-income countries
  • Barriers to the use of hearing aid systems in low-and middle-income countries
  • Beyond devices: what to consider when providing hearing aids in LMICs
  • Improving access to hearing care and hearing rehabilitation in the Philippines
     

Living in hell : abuses against people with psychosocial disabilities in Indonesia

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH (HRW)
March 2016

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This article with a video is related to a report examining the abuses—including pasung—that persons with psychosocial disabilities face in the community, mental hospitals, and various other institutions in Indonesia, including stigma, arbitrary and prolonged detention, involuntary treatment, and physical and sexual violence. It also examines the government’s shortcomings in addressing these problems.

Based on research across the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra, Human Rights Watch documented 175 cases of persons with psychosocial disabilities in pasung or who were recently rescued from pasung. 

 

Packages of care for epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries

MBUBA, Caroline K
NEWTON, Charles R
October 2009

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This article focuses on the management of epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries and recommends a package of care - a combination of interventions aimed at improving the recognition and management of conditions to achieve optimal outcomes - for epilepsy, that is sustainable

Disability among clients attending Taif Rehabilitation Centre, Saudi Arabia

AL-SHEHRI, Abdul-Salam A
ABDEL-FATTAH, Moataz M
July 2008

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This is a cross-sectional study examining 850 hospital records of people who were admitted to Rehab Armed Forces Rehabilitation Center, Taif, Saudi Arabia from 1999 to 2005. Data were collected on age, sex, nationality, date of admission and discharge, and type of disability. Recommendations are provided to expand home care programmes, to minimize duration of stay at the rehabilitation centres, and to increase health education of the public to assist in encouraging disabled people to adapt to daily life activities

Helping a forgotten minority : disability and HIV/AIDS in Zambia

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
June 2007

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This article and case study demonstrate work being done in Zambia to ensure that the needs of people with disabilities are met by HIV and AIDS services, so that they have full access to the treatment, care and support available. Provisions include sign language training for HIV and AIDS counsellors, making mobility aids and hearing aids available to those who need them, as well as improving food security and encouraging a sustainable livelihoods approach. This would be of interest to anyone looking at mainstreaming disability in the provision of HIV and AIDS services

The care economy : gender and the silent AIDS crisis in Southern Africa

URDANG, Stephanie
March 2006

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This article considers the impact of AIDS on women’s roles and responsibilities within the household ‘care economy’. In particular, it emphasises that all interventions aimed at reversing the AIDS epidemic need to take into account the excessive work-load that members of the household, usually women, shoulder in responding to the needs of sick family members. Most notably, gender equality and care economy issues need to be identified by development programmes. There is also a need to implement policies that focus on issues such as treatment, prevention, education, economic empowerment and violence against women. The article argues that unless the care economy and the relations of gender inequality within the household are included in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of such interventions, results will be compromised

An analysis of reading errors of dyslexic readers in Hindi and English

GUPTA, Ashum
JAMAL, Gulgoona
2006

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[Authors' abstract] : The present study examined the nature of reading errors made by dyslexic readers in Hindi and English. A detailed analysis of error type showed 60% and 57% of phonological errors; 15% and 35% of orthographic errors; 25% and 7% of mixed errors; and 0.38% and 0.94% of unrelated errors in Hindi and English, respectively. Further, in both Hindi and English, the majority (65% & 69%, respectively) were the scaffolding errors, followed by the errors preserving the initial phoneme (22% & 23%, respectively), errors preserving the final phoneme (9% & 6%, respectively) and errors with orthographic overlap (4% & 2%, respectively). In Hindi, a far greater percentage of nonword (89%) than word (11%) errors was found, whereas in English, 54% of nonword and 46% of word errors was found. A significant correlation was found between reading accuracy in Hindi and in English. The findings are discussed in terms of linguistic interdependence hypothesis and orthographic transparency

Health Canada unveils new health threat alert system

January 2005

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This brief article reports on a new global system to detect public health and bioterrorism threats, developed in Canada. The system will be used to track high-profile threats, as well as lesser problems such as contamination to food and water sources, natural disasters, and unsafe medical products, drugs and medical devices. WHO is a key recipient of the alerts, and is using the information to develop plans of action to control outbreaks

Orphans and the impact of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

DE WAGT, A
CONNOLLY, M
2005

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In Africa 11 million children have become orphans as a result of AIDS, and the data for sub-Saharan Africa is expected to worsen dramatically over the next few years. This article assesses the implications of increased child vulnerability in terms of care needs, education, survival, and, crucially, nutrition and food security. It suggests that these are vital aspects of children's development and even more importantly they are interconnected: children's nutrition status, for example, affects their cognitive and emotional development and this in turn impacts on their health status. The article calls for a combined development-humanitarian response, capable of responding to the immediate basic needs of orphans but also designed to help recover long-lasting capability and community and family coping mechanisms

Approaches to treating malaria anaemia

BATES, Imelda
July 2004

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This article forms part of the research conducted by the Malaria Knowledge Programme at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. The article considers the prevalence and causes of anaemia in patients with malaria. It looks at diagnosis, treatment and blood transfusions and the prevention of anaemia through clinical detection and the use of bednets to prevent malaria

Treating TB and HIV

OXLADE, Lisa
SPENCER, Lyhanna
Eds
2003

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This newsletter focuses on the challenges and treatment of tuberculosis in people who are also living with HIV

The challenge of prosthetic services in developing countries

LUNDQUIST, Michael
December 2002

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This article describes the challenges of providing landmine victims and other disabled persons in developing countries with the support and services they need to recover. The author explains that a holistic approach to rehabilitative care is necessary and applies this principle to community-based rehabilitation

Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa : can family and community resources improve the odds?

MILES, M
2002

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Hydrocephalus and spina bifida are life threatening conditions that often result in severe dsabilities. Risks are much reduced by immediate surgery and careful managment, but neither has been available for most of the sub-Saharan African population. This paper traces the growth of solutions and some socio-cultural resources that historically have supported family and community care for children with severe disabilities, mainly in Tanzania, and nearby countries. Some community-based rehabilitation (CBR) work with children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus is described, and challenges to the CBR approach are noted from the increased survival of people with disabilities requiring complex care. More appropriate information, recognition of indigenous knowledge, enlistment of community resources and financial assistance are needed to enhance the lives of East Africans with hydrocephalus, spina bifida and other severely disabling conditions

Breast cancer in south-east Republic of Yemen

ABDUL HAMID, G
TAYEB, M S
BAWAZIR, A A
November 2001

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This retrospective study of breast cancer was carried out using the treatment registry of Aden Health Office and archives of Al-Gamhoria Teaching Hospital. It advocates for a comprehensive national approach to increase research funding in this area

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