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The role of the extended family in women's risk of intimate partner violence in Jordan

Nora Groce
Jay Silverman
Manal Shahrouri
Cari Clark
2019

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The extended family as a potential cause of and protection against intimate partner violence (IPV) remains relatively unstudied. This mixed-methods study used focus group discussions (FGDs) and a clinic-based survey to investigate several family-based risk and protective factors associated with women's risk of IPV in Jordan. Seventeen FGDs (total number of participants = 105) were conducted with women in Amman. Each transcript was coded for categories using open coding methodology and mapping. Relevant categories and subcategories were family support, family interference, family abuse, exposure to violence in childhood, and place of residence. For the survey, systematic probability proportionate to size methodology was used to select a sample of 517 literate, ever married, women from seven reproductive health clinics located throughout the country (response rate = ≤70%); due to missing data, the analytic sample was restricted to 418 women. Measures assessed the categories mentioned above. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between IPV and the main predictors of interest (residence, family interference, family violence, exposure to violence as a child, and family support). The combined results of the FGDs and the survey demonstrated that the respondent's husband's exposure to violence in childhood and violence perpetrated by other family members were risk factors for IPV. Family interference was also significantly related to IPV but only when the respondent identified the interference as harmful to her relationship. Residence with the respondent's in-laws demonstrated mixed effects. A supportive family was protective against IPV, although the FGDs revealed that families were not always an effective source of assistance. Findings demonstrate the continued role of the wife's and husband's kin in women's risk of IPV in Jordan, highlighting the importance of a broader view of the context of IPV.

Children with disabilities : a critical appraisal

SABATELLO, Maya
2013

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This essay contemplates the rights of children with disabilities under international law. It anal­yses the philosophical and practical reasons for the failure of the Convention on the Rights of the Child to protect the rights of children with disabilities, and looks at the remedial measures adopted under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The argument advanced is that, especially when children’s perspectives are considered, assistive technologies are at the heart of national and international efforts to advance the rights of children with disabilities, most importantly, a right to inclusion. The author considers the challenges ahead and draw conclusions on the future of the rights of children with disabilities

International Journal of Children’s Rights, 21 

CRPD advocacy by the world network of users and survivors of psychiatry : the emergence of a user/survivor perspective in human rights

MINKOVITZ, Tina
August 2012

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"Human rights law evolves through processes of social eruption, in which social movements agitate for the recognition of injustices as legal wrongs, and in which sectors of the population that have been oppressed rise up to assert themselves as protagonists who change the landscape of law along with the social, economic and cultural relationships in which law is grounded. The involvement of users and survivors of psychiatry in the CRPD drafting and negotiations, as an integral part of the community of people with disabilities, set the stage for a dramatic (r)evolution in human rights law. This paper explores the genesis of key provisions in the CRPD on legal capacity, liberty, and freedom from forced interventions, and their early interpretation and application"

Women’s Experience of Group Prenatal Care

Gina Novick
Lois S. Sadler
Sally S. Cohen
Holly Powell Kennedy
Kathleen A. Knafl
Nora Groce
2010

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Group prenatal care (GPNC) is an innovative alternative to individual prenatal care. In this longitudinal study we used ethnographic methods to explore African American and Hispanic women’s experiences of receiving GPNC in two urban clinics. Methods included individual, in-depth, semistructured interviews of women and group leaders in GPNC, participant observation of GPNC sessions, and medical record review. GPNC offered positive experiences and met many of women’s expressed preferences regarding prenatal care. Six themes were identified, which represented separate aspects of women’s experiences: investment, collaborative venture, a social gathering, relationships with boundaries, learning in the group, and changing self. Taken together, the themes conveyed the overall experience of GPNC. Women were especially enthusiastic about learning in groups, about their relationships with group leaders, and about having their pregnancy-related changes and fears normalized; however, there were also important boundaries on relationships between participants, and some women wished for greater privacy during physical examinations.

HIV/AIDS and Disability Organizations in South Africa

Poul Rohleder
Leslie Swartz
Arne Henning Eide
Nora Groce
Marguerite Schneider
January 2010

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Despite the seriousness of the HIV epidemic globally, and in South Africa in particular, little is known about how HIV/AIDS affects disabled people. One important and little explored area is the role that organisations that represent disabled people or that work on behalf of disabled people, are playing in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among the disabled people they represent or serve. This paper presents the findings of a nationwide survey of disability organisations in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of disability organisations in addressing the HIV epidemic among disabled people in South Africa. The findings suggest that while organisations recognise the importance of providing HIV education, and many have taken steps to do so, disabled people are largely excluded from general HIV prevention messages. Disabled people also have significant difficulties in accessing general health care, relevant for HIV testing and treatment. In a country trying to manage serious social problems with limited resources, this paper highlights the need for increased cooperation and collaboration between relevant parties in order to facilitate the changes necessary for disabled people to access needed health information and care.

Disability and the training of health professionals

GROCE, Nora
SHAKESPEARE, Tom
LEZZONI, Lisa I
2009

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Evidence shows that people with disabilities often rate their own quality of life much higher than others rate their quality of life: subjective satisfaction of disabled people is usually comparable to that of non disabled people. [...] physicians and other healthcare professionals need to accept that many people with disabilities, particularly where their health conditions are congenital or long term, do not necessarily perceive their disability as a problem or pathology.

The Lancet
Volume 374, Issue 9704, 28 November–4 December 2009, Pages 1815-1816

Surviving sepsis in low-income and middle-income countries: new directions for care and research

Nora Groce
Joseph U Becker
Christian Theodosis
Shevin T Jacob
Charles R Wira
2009

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Sepsis is a disorder characterised by systemic inflammation secondary to infection. Despite recent progress in the understanding and treatment of sepsis, no data or recommendations exist that detail effective approaches to sepsis care in resource-limited low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although few data exist on the burden of sepsis in LMICs, the prevalence of HIV and other comorbid conditions in some LMICs suggest that sepsis is a substantial contributor to mortality in these regions. In well-resourced countries, sepsis management relies on protocols and complex invasive technologies not widely available in most LMICs. However, the key concepts and components of sepsis management are potentially translatable to resource-limited environments. Health personnel in LMICs should be educated in the recognition of sepsis and the importance of early and appropriate antibiotic use. Simple and low-cost standardised laboratory testing should be emphasised to allow accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of treatment response. Evidence-based interventions and treatment algorithms tailored to LMIC ecology and resources should thus be developed and validated.

Ensuring the enfranchisement of people with disabilities

WARD, Andrew
BAKER, Paul M A
MOON, Nathan W
October 2008

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"In a representational democracy, the process of selecting people to represent the electorate is critical. To accomplish this goal, it is crucial that elections be fair and accurate reflections of the decisions of the voters. However, a significant and relatively unacknowledged constituency, people with disabilities, faces a variety of barriers to full participation in the U.S. electoral democracy. Recent research has provided evidence that how people with disabilities vote is just as important as the physical barriers they face when casting their votes. This article presents an overview of the literature addressing issues that affect how people with disabilities vote, with an especial focus on the role of election officials as both facilitators and inhibitors of voting by people with disabilities"
Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Vol 20, No 2

Impairment as a Human Constant: Cross‐Cultural and Historical Perspectives on Variation

Nora Groce
Ed
1988

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The social science literature on physical disabilities suffers a curious omission in the relative lack of attention paid to a cross‐cultural or historical perspective. We argue that disability is a human constant—that is, all human societies have and have always had disabled members. While the presence of such individuals is a constant, culturally shared responses to them vary greatly across time and social context.

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