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Representation, access and contestation: Facebook and vision impairment in Jordan, India, and Peru

PAL, Joyojeet
ALFARO, Ana Maria Huaita
AMMARI, Tawfiq W
CHHABRA, Sidharth
LAKSHMANAN, Meera
2015

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This paper presents qualitative research on the use of Facebook by visually impaired people and organizations representing them in Jordan, Peru, and India. We found that individuals and organizations have very different motivations and pathways for using social media. Social media serve as a means to help individuals with vision impairments to expand their social circles, network with casual acquaintances, and find various kinds of social and technical resources independently. However on issues of representation we found that social media have the potential to play a double-edged sword, reinforcing in some cases the same stereotypes that individual users of assistive technology (AT) sought to overcome by using technology in their professional lives. We find that individuals often characterize social media and assistive technology in the same vein — suggesting that for many parts of the global South, the dramatic change in the means and ability to leverage social and professional possibilities has not come from any one technology alone, but from a broader evolution of the technological environment available to people with vision impairments. Access to social media and technology disrupt an environment in which social and economic spaces for people with disabilities are still a zone of contestation between a dominant discourse of vision impairment enforced by generations of negative representations of disability, and a new world of technology users challenging representations and assumptions as engaged, connected professionals.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

2015

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Articles include:

  • Typhoon Haiyan One Year On: Disability, Poverty and Participation in the Philippines
  • Beneath the rhetoric: Policy to reduce the mental health treatment gap in Africa
  • Working within the tensions of disability and education in post-colonial Kenya: Toward a praxis of critical disability studies
  • How disability studies and ecofeminist approaches shape research: exploring small-scale farmer perceptions of banana cultivation in the Lake Victoria region, Uganda
  • Partnerships for Disability Research in Africa: Lessons Learned in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Representation, Access and Contestation: Facebook and Vision Impairment in Jordan, India, and Peru

Equal basis 2014 : access and rights in 33 countries

BURKE, Megan
PERSI VICENTIC, Loren
December 2014

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This report presents research about efforts to meet the needs and uphold the rights of persons with disabilities in four thematic areas: health care, rehabilitation, work and employment, and accessibility and enabling environments. Research findings are drawn from the experiences of landmine and cluster munition survivors and other persons with similar needs in 33 countries experiencing armed conflict or emerging from armed conflict or political or economic transition. Findings are placed within the context of relevant articles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the World Report on Disability

Fact sheet : refugees with disabilities

WOMEN’S REFUGEE COMMISSION
2014

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This factsheet highlights the issue of disabilities among refugees and conflict-affected population. It emphasizes actions undertaken by the Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) and highlights their next steps in disability inclusion

Note: Also available in easy read format

Rehabilitation Services for Persons Affected by Stroke in Jordan

AL-ORAIBI, S
DAWSON, V L
BALLOCH, S
MOORE, A P
2011

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The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions stroke survivors have of the rehabilitation services received by them in the Jordanian community. A secondary aim was to explore the impact of culture on providing appropriate services for stroke survivors.

 

Eighteen stroke survivors were recruited from an outpatient stroke rehabilitation programme. All 18 participants had been discharged from hospital for between one and six months. Semi-structured interviews were performed, either in thephysiotherapy outpatient clinic where the affected person was attending a clinic or in their homes. Transcription of interviews carried out in Arabic and thematic analysis was also carried out in that language by transcribers who were fluent in Arabic and English, using a back-translation method. Necessary measures were taken to ensure the accuracy, reliability and validity of the data collection and analysis.

 

Following thematic analysis, themes arising out of the data included physiotherapy and occupational therapy support in the community, out-patient rehabilitation clinic services, community clinic services and support from families, friends and neighbours. Participants expressed satisfaction with their therapists, but there were large areas of unmet rehabilitation need for stroke survivors in the Jordanian community such as a limited availability of occupational therapy services, insufficient amount of therapy services and poor medical support.

 

This study presents a unique contribution to knowledge relating to the experiences of stroke survivors in a developing country, and also shows how care systems are very dependent on cultural contexts, cultural beliefs and practices.

Voices from the ground : landmine and explosive remnants of war survivors speak out on victim assistance

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
September 2009

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This report surveys landmine survivors’ opinions on assistance. The survey includes questionnaires and data from 1,645 survivors in 25 affected countries. The report finds that survivors are rarely included in decisions and activities destined to benefit them and subsequently more than two-thirds think that their needs are not taken into account when their governments makes plans to assist them. This document is useful for people interested in landmine survivor's opinions about governments supporting and reintegrating landmine survivors into society

The disability monitor initiative - Middle East journal : issue 1

THE DISABILITY MONITOR INITIATIVE
May 2009

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This issue of The Disability Monitor Initiative - Middle East Journal focuses upon 'Education for All' and contains informative studies and articles about inclusive education in the Middle Eastern context regarding policy and good practices. It also includes a list of relevant Arabic and English publications. The journal is an advocacy initiative that gathers and disseminates information on relevant disability topics underpinning the move towards full participation and equal opportunities of people with disabilities. It is primarily based on field research consulting with people with disabilities, service providers, members of civil society, government officials and local authorities. It is a useful resource for anyone interested in inclusive education for people with disabilities in the Middle East

Measuring transparency to improve good governance in the public pharmaceutical sector : Jordan

NUSEIRAT, Adi
2009

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"This report presents the findings of the first phase of the [World Health Organization's] national Good Governance for Medicines programme in Jordan. The assessment aims to obtain a picture of the level of transparency and potential vulnerability to corruption in the public pharmaceutical sector using WHO’s assessment instrument. In Jordan, the assessment looked at six functions: medicines registration, inspection of pharmaceutical establishments, promotion, selection, procurement and distribution"

Access to social services for persons with disabilities in the Middle East : multi-stakeholder reflections for policy reform

AXELSSON, Charlotte
BARRETT, Darryl
2009

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This report highlights the importance of ensuring access to services for persons with disabilities. It introduces mechanisms related to access to services and reflects on the roles and responsibilities of each main stakeholder, providing recommendations for regulatory mechanisms. It highlights good practices of service provision collected throughout the region from workshops, field visits and exchanges with stakeholders, providing recommendations for improving access to services for persons with disabilities. This report has been produced under the Disability Monitor Initiative Middle East. It would be useful for stakeholders and advocates interested in access to services for people with disabilities in the Middle East

Disability & deafness in the Middle East, a bibliography : comprising materials with technical, cultural and historical relevance to child and adult impairments, disabilities and deafness, incapacity, mental disorders, special needs, social and educatio

MILES, M
June 2008

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"This revised, retitled and updated bibliography now lists c. 1750 items. It aims to record the cumulative formal knowledge base in the disability field in countries of the Middle East, especially Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, and some smaller neighbours. Around 45% of the items in the bibliography, listed in the last two sections with a brief introduction, comprise historical materials of the Middle East from 1751 to 1970 and from Antiquity to 1750, as an essential and fascinating part of the cultural background. This earlier material has more annotation (and so takes about 60% of the total word-count), to enable potential readers to find the disability-related parts that are sometimes hidden in odd corners or footnotes, and also to indicate some cultural features that might be less easily understood nowadays. Greater coverage has also been given to disability and deafness in Egyptology, Assyriology, and the Hittite Kingdom in Anatolia"

Disabilities among refugees and conflict-affected populations

WOMEN'S COMMISSION FOR REFUGEE WOMEN AND CHILDREN
June 2008

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"This report is the culmination of a six-month project...to address the rights and needs of displaced persons with disabilities, with a particular focus on women (including older women), children and youth. Based on field research in five refugee situations, as well as global desk research, the Women’s Commission sought to map existing services for displaced persons with disabilities, identify gaps and good practices and make recommendations on how to improve services, protection and participation for displaced persons with disabilities"

Building the knowledge base on the social determinants of health : review of seven countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

WATTS, Susan
SIDDIQI, Sameen
Eds
2008

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"The WHO Global Commission on Social Determinants of Health was launched in 2005 with the aim of identifying and tackling the persistent and growing inequalities in health, both within and between countries. These inequalities are caused by what we now term social determinants, defined as the way people live, work and age in a society. In the Eastern Mediterranean Region the knowledge base on social determinants and how these influence health is sparse. "This publication reviews the social determinants of health in seven countries of the Region and represents a first step towards building a knowledge base that can inform policy and strategies related to social determinants and the health inequities arising from them. The publication also discusses some of the strategies that could be adopted to forward the agenda on social determinants of health and health equity in individual countries"

Disability and development: is the rights model of disability valid in the Arab region? An evidence-based field survey in Lebanon and Jordan

NAGATA, Kozue Kay
2008

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This paper reviews the process and outcome of constructing a "rights model of disability" which is culturally specific to Jordan and Lebanon. The objective of the empirical part was, to survey the current level of attitudes of non-disabled people towards their disabled fellows in Jordan, and to compare the attitudes of Lebanon's university students towards five different categories of disabled people (mentally disabled people, psycho-socially disabled people, physically disabled people, hearing impaired people and visually impaired people) to highlight the variations and diversity among them. It also examined the relationship between the attitudes and various demographic and social characteristics of the respondents. The set of findings was further tested and triangulated through meta-analysis of individual views expressed in the qualitative studies.

In Jordan, the attitude of 191 randomly selected non-disabled people was studied, using a Scale of Attitudes towards Disabled Persons (SADP). The participants from 4 communities of Jordan, exhibited overall negative attitudes towards disabled people. Socio-economic-demographic characteristics showed almost no difference regarding their attitudes towards disabled people.

In Lebanon, a more complex scale, composed of four sub-scales, namely a, "Baseline Survey of Student Attitudes towards People with a Disability" was used, to survey 94 university students' attitudes towards five different categories of disabled people, and a set of indices for future comparison was constructed. The results indicated the same pattern of gradations of attitude differences (found in other countries) towards persons with physical or sensory impairments (better), intellectual impairment (middle) and mental illness (worse). The main findings of this empirical field research showed particularly negative public attitudes towards people with intellectual impairment and mental illness in Lebanon.

Finally, the validity of the proposed rights model of disability and the empirical findings of this study, were further examined and co-validated through analysis of the collective views of those who took part in the questionnaire surveys and the participatory focus group discussions, which took place in Lebanon in 2005 and 2007, and in Jordan in 2005, as well as a series of intensive on-line and/or telephone interviews of a few informants comprising of disabled persons and experts. The policy implications of the findings are discussed.

 

Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 19, No 1

External evaluation of the community based rehabilitation program (CBR) in Jarash Camp, Amman, Jordan

YASSIR, Samar Al
November 2004

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This in an evaluation of a CBR project started in 1988 in a refugee camp. The general objective of the project is "to reach the biggest number of disabled persons in need of rehabilitation, and that an increased number of disabled persons live independently and are integrated in the society." Strategies include developing capabilities of disabled persons through the services offered by the Community Rehabilitation Centre, mobilization of local resources and awareness raising and advocacy.The evaluators found that the project urgently needs to include PWDs in the running of the project and to adopt a long-term strategy developing PWDs integration and economic autonomy. It also recommends a need for organizational change, improved monitoring and evaluation, staff motivation, and management and planning

The provision of reproductive health services in private hospitals in Amman, Jordan

BANKS, Dwayne
SHAHROURI, Manal
September 2003

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This survey of the 30 private acute care hospitals in Amman provides baseline information on services and aims to help the Jordanian Ministry of Health (MOH) understand the steps it must take to enhance its contracting with private sector facilities. The survey measured the availability of a broad range of hospital services, focussing on prenatal, delivery, and postnatal services. It also looked at hospital staffing, and it queried the satisfaction of hospitals with existing contracts with the MOH and their willingness to expand contractual relationships, comply with clinical guidelines, and participate in the health information system. The survey found that, among the 25 respondent hospitals, more than 90 percent offered reproductive health services. While all hospitals expressed a willingness to engage in a contractual relationship with the MOH, many described frustrations with current contracting, and less than half were willing to use the clinical guidelines and the information system

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