Resources search

Preventing gender-based violence : getting it right

BUSCHER, Dale
February 2014

Expand view

This article looks at key factors in the prevention of Gender Based Violence (GBV) in disaster, conflict and resettlement situations, recognising the need for better understanding and investigation into why known strategies are unevenly implemented. These factors include the importance of key interventions during the first days and weeks; socio-cultural norms and legal and policy frameworks; the lack of basic needs and lack of economic, educational and social opportunities; and engaging men and boys. The article concludes by suggesting that a more collective, cross-sectoral approach, reinforced with accountability systems, is required for overall progress in GBV prevention

Humanitarian Exchange Magazine, Issue 60

 

Tools for knowledge and learning : a guide for development and humanitarian organisations

RAMALINGAM, Ben
July 2006

Expand view

This toolkit brings together approaches and techniques aimed at supporting the learning and knowledge management of humanitarian organisations, to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their work. It provides a comprehensive overview of 30 tools and techniques, divided into five categories: i) strategy development; ii) management techniques; iii) collaboration mechanisms; iv) knowledge sharing and learning processes; and v) knowledge capture and storage. This guide is primarily aimed at staff working in development organisations

Policy engagement for poverty reduction : how civil society can be more effective

COURT, Julius
June 2006

Expand view

This briefing paper draws on a report by Julius Court and others entitled 'Policy engagement: how can civil society be more effective', also published by ODI. It examines the role of civil society organisations in poverty reduction strategies and looks at ways to enhance their influence on the policy making process. Inadequate knowledge about the policy making process, lack of resources, insufficient capacity and policy makers' mistrust of CSOs are the main obstacles to their full engagement in policy making. Effective approaches should entail: campaigning and implementation of pilot projects aimed at improving adverse political contexts; rigorous mapping and assessment of political contexts; identify critical policy stages; provide relevant and objective evidence; use effective communication methods and strategies; apply network approaches; engage in systematic capacity building

Successful communication : a toolkit for researchers and civil society organisations

HOVLAND, Ingie
October 2005

Expand view

From the introduction: "This toolkit is for researchers and practitioners who wish to communicate to policymakers. The tools are therefore specifically geared towards the needs of researchers and practitioners in civil society organisations (CSOs), including development NGOs, research institutes, think tanks, universities and networks. The toolkit addresses the questions of how researchers and CSOs can best communicate evidence in order to inform or influence policy, to achieve their own stated development objectives, or simply to make their own knowledge accessible and understandable to a wider audience." After a brief but useful introduction, tools are presented in four sections: planning, packaging, targeting and monitoring

Implementing knowledge strategies : lessons from international development agencies

RAMALINGAM, Ben
April 2005

Expand view

This study synthesises existing research on knowledge and learning in the development sector, and draws out eight key questions for examining related strategies and systems in development agencies. Together, these questions make up a comprehensive Knowledge Strategies Framework, which brings together four 'dimensions': organisational knowledge, organisational links, organisational contexts, and external factors. The study then presents the analysis of data collected on current knowledge and learning practices in 13 selected case study organisations. It finds that organisational learning is most effective where it is defined and understood, and where it is linked to ongoing processes. It sets out questions and considerations for further investigation

Communication of research for poverty reduction : a literature review

HOVLAND, Ingie
October 2003

Expand view

This literature review maps current recommendations and emerging themes relevant to communicating research for poverty reduction. It draws on an annotated bibliography of over 100 documents produced by DFID and other development agencies, research institutes, academics and practitioners. It addresses the needs of different audiences, and identifies gaps in the literature around approaching communication as a systemic issue, improving the conditions under which reseach is communicated, facilitating user engagement in communication of research, at different levels, and investing in double-loop learning

Knowledge management and organisational learning : an international development perspective. An annotated bibliography

HOVLAND, Ingie
August 2003

Expand view

This annotated bibliography aims to review the current literature on knowledge management (KM) and organisational learning, particularly in relation to the international development field. It maps out the rationale and objectives of KM and learning in order to identify gaps and emerging themes of special interest to development actors and agencies. The specific characteristics and challenges of different types of organisations in the development field are reviewed in this paper. Most of the literature focuses on the knowledge needs of Northern and international NGOs, and some of the central authors in this field are highlighted. Some work also exists on KM and learning in relation to bilateral and multilateral donor agencies, and the World Bank as 'Knowledge Bank' has placed a new focus on knowledge issues. However, there is still a lack of literature on the knowledge needs and specific challenges of Southern institutions. A few of the studies that have been carried out are included in this bibliography, and the introduction draws out some of the issues they raise. Even less systematic work has been carried out on the specialised niche of research institutes and think-tanks within international development. A few gaps in the literature are identified: the first issue is whether KM and learning can increase the responsiveness of development institutions to the situation of the poor; the second is whether KM and learning can increase development organisations' impact on policy; the third question raised is whether KM and learning can improve the translation of development policy into practice; and the final question concerns Southern engagement in international development debates and decision-making processes

Bridging research and policy : insights from 50 case studies

COURT, Julius
YOUNG, John
August 2003

Expand view

This paper looks at why some research policy ideas are picked up and acted on while others are ignored and disappear. It examines the processes, findings and implications of 50 summary case studies on research policy linkages. Discussion centres around four interlinked spheres: context, evidence, links and external influences. Some case studies show a clear and direct link between research and policy, while most show a less direct impact with a necessity for strong advocacy efforts. The case studies represent an interesting range of evidence and experience about research-policy links from around the world. They include examples from a wide range of types of research carried out by a variety of organisations and illustrate different types of policy impact. This ranges from direct impact on policy, changes in policy implementation, and changes on the ground but little in policy

The role of education in protecting children in conflict

NICOLAI, Susan
TRIPLEHORN, Carl
2003

Expand view

This paper explores the links between education and the wider protection of children in conflicts. It argues that the role of education must be researched so that it can already be used in emerging conflicts and protect children more effectively

Foreign direct investment : who gains?

WILLEM DE VELDE, Dirk
MORRISSEY, Oliver
April 2002

Expand view

Although foreign direct investment (FDI) contributes to growth in developing countries, there is evidence that the benefits are not equally distributed. Foreign-owned firms tend to pay higher wages in developing countries, but skilled workers tend to benefit more than less-skilled workers. This conclusion is based on new research conducted into the effects of FDI on wages in five east Asian economies and the effects of foreign ownership in five African countries. While FDI may support development in the aggregate, more attention should be focused on the distribution of gains from FDI, notably effects on wage inequality

Bridging research and policy : an annotated bibliography

HOVLAND, Ingie
DE VIBE, Maja
YOUNG, John
2002

Expand view

An extensive annotated bibliography of 100 documents relevant to 'bridging research and policy'. Mainstream literature is supplemented with alternative viewpoints. The bibliography has been divided into three key themes ('bridging research and policy: the political context', 'the actors: networks, organisations, individuals', 'the message and the media'), including 'new' subject areas that may be useful (eg social psychology, media studies, marketing and communication). The entries are listed alphabetically by author, and then cross-indexed by theme, and by academic discipline

Bridging research and policy : context, evidence and links

CREWE, Emma
YOUNG, John
2002

Expand view

An exploration of the links between research and policy-making with the aim of finding some simple research tools to promote evidence-based policy that contributes to poverty reduction.
Recommends a historical, contextual and comparative methodology to consider the real-life links between institutional settings, a range of political and contextual influences, and power relations.
Identifies a range of bureaucratic pressures such as: the urge to simplify, due to resource shortages; ‘giantism’ - the bigger the budget, the greater the status; inflexible long-term project planning; fierce competition for funding - discouraging collaboration.
Also considers the role of different communication channels, their effectiveness and credibility, and the chains of accountability and legitimacy that link NGOs, researchers and policy makers.
Concludes that research is more likely to have an influence if it fits the political and institutional limits and pressures of policy makers; if researchers and policy-makers share networks in particular policy areas; outputs are based on local involvement and credible evidence and are communicated via the most appropriate communicators.
Finally advocates more research to track some historical examples of key policy decisions and the influences upon them

Agricultural knowledge and information systems in Kenya : implications for technology dissemination and development

REES, David
et al
July 2000

Expand view

This paper reports on a study of agricultural knowledge and information systems (AKIS) undertaken by the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute and the Ministry of Agriculture. Field research was conducted in four districts of Kenya, including high-potential and pastoral areas, to document and assess the significance of different actors and organisations as potential uptake/dissemination pathways for agricultural technologies, and to consider ways to improve the performance of the knowledge and information systems in the districts. Databases of the organisations, institutions and actors involved in agriculture in the four districts were compiled, and a series of participatory and rapid appraisal exercises were carried out with people concerned with agriculture in selected sub-locations and divisions within each district

The policy process : an overview

SUTTON, Rebecca
August 1999

Expand view

This introduction to the policy process describes theoretical approaches in political science, sociology, anthropology, international relations and management. It examines (a) the dichotomy between policy-making and implementation; (b) the management of change; (c) the role of interest groups in the policy process; (d) ownership of the policy process; and (e) the narrowing of policy alternatives. The paper concludes with a 21-point check-list of 'what makes policy happen'. A glossary of key terms is provided

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates