Resources search

Humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities

ADCAP
TILL, Celia
et al
February 2018

Expand view

The Humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities provide guidance across all areas and at all stages of emergency response to ensure older people and people with disabilities are not left out.

The standards consist of nine key inclusion standards, including identification, safe and equitable access, knowledge and participation, and learning. Alongside these, there are seven sector-specific inclusion standards, which include protection, shelter, health, and water, sanitation and hygiene.

Each standard comes with key actions, guidance, tools and resources, and case studies illustrating how older people and people with disabilities have been included in humanitarian responses.

The sector-specific standards provide guidance in three key areas: data and information management, addressing barriers to inclusion, and participation of older people and people with disabilities.

By implementing the key action points provided, organisations will build up a greater evidence base, deliver more inclusive programmes, and be able to better demonstrate impact on the lives of those most at risk during humanitarian crises.

The standards can be used as guidance during programme development, implementation and monitoring, and as a resource for training and advocacy.

Landmine Monitor 2017

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES – CLUSTER MUNITION COALITION (ICBL-CMC)
December 2017

Expand view

Landmine Monitor 2017 provides a global overview of the landmine situation. Chapters on developments in specific countries and other areas are available in online Country Profiles on the website.

Landmine Monitor covers mine ban policy, use, production, trade, and stockpiling in every country in the world, and also includes information on contamination, clearance, casualties, victim assistance, and support for mine action. The report focuses on calendar year 2016, with information included up to November 2017 when possible.

The Victim Assistance section covers: assessing the needs; frameworks for assistance; enhancing plans and policies; inclusion and active participation of mine victims; availability of and accessibility to services (medical care, rehabilitation including prosthetics; socioeconomic inclusion; education, pyschosocial support); guaranteeing rights in an age- and gender-sensitive manner; communicating objectives and reporting improvements; legal frameworks and new laws.

Inclusive and integrated mother, newborn and child health programming: Beyond mortality

OLCHINI, Davide
November 2017

Expand view

This policy paper describes the operational terms of Handicap International’s mandate and values as applied to Mother, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH). Presenting the approaches and references underpinning Handicap International’s actions, choices and commitments, its purpose is to ensure consistency across its practices while taking account of different contexts. Intended as a document to guide programme staff, the paper defines the topic, describes the target populations and sets out the methods of intervention (activities and expected results) and the indicators used to monitor and evaluate. It also aims to ensure that Handicap International programmes implement all projects in accordance with the presented methods of intervention

 

The SDGs focus on a broader scope of activities and are thus slowly but surely shifting from mortality to address in a more comprehensive manner the well-being and achievement of maximum potential for children and adolescents. With a robust component in sexual and reproductive health, this represents a significant frame of reference for Handicap International’s work in MNCH as it has paved the way for integrating MNCH-related impairments into existing health services. The framework of the SDGs provides a clear vision of the importance of multi-sectorial interventions, which encompass the limit of vertically-organised health systems centred on curative aspects, to offer a more integrated and preventive package of interventions that include chronic conditions, impairments and health for all. After many years of implementing MNCH projects, Handicap International is well-positioned and firmly established as a major player in this process.

Quality inclusive education for children with disabilities in Ethiopia

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL ETHIOPIA
2017

Expand view

Achieving education for all in Ethiopia will remain a distant aspiration if most of the 5 million children with special educational needs in the country cannot go to school. Since 2014, Handicap International have been supporting 49 schools to become places where everyone has a role to play in making schools more inclusive.

Cluster Munition Monitor 2017

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES – CLUSTER MUNITION COALITION (ICBL-CMC)
August 2017

Expand view

Cluster Munition Monitor covers cluster munition ban policy, use, production, transfers, and stockpiling in every country in the world, and also contains information on cluster munition contamination and clearance activities, as well as casualties and victim assistance. Its principal frame of reference is the Convention on Cluster Munitions, although other relevant international law is reviewed, including the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The report focuses on calendar year 2016, with information included into July 2017 where possible. Sections are: cluster munition ban policy; contamination and clearance; casualties; victim assistance; and status of the convention

 

The Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning physical rehabilitation services

PRYOR, Wesley
SMITH, Fleur
April 2017

Expand view

Ensuring quality and affordable rehabilitation services to anyone in need is at the heart of Handicap International mandate and strategy. The organisation is implementing physical rehabilitation projects in 40 countries,  The Rehabilitation Management System was initially developed to allow for more effective and reliable analysis of the quality of rehabilitation services in low resource countries. It draws on international standards, consensus and evidence and it is made of a set of scorecards that are used to monitor key components of management and support service planning. The initial instrument went through several participatory revisions and has been now implemented by Handicap International partners for about 6 years. While it covers domains that are specific to rehabilitation services, it is aligned to the broader health system strengthening framework. It is currently used in around 14 physical rehabilitation centers in 8 countries where settings and governance systems considerably vary, reflecting the different stages of development of physical rehabilitation services worldwide.

The “Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning Physical Rehabilitation services” guide follows the revision of the RMS scorecards, as a response to the demand from partner organisations, programmes and the Handicap International’s Rehabilitation Technical Unit for a greater adaptability of the system. It is hoped that this guide will further assist partners and programmes in implementing the RMS in effective and strategic management of their services in order to provide the highest quality care in the most sustainable manner.

Factsheet. Maternal health and rehabilitation

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL;
March 2017

Expand view

Maternal health concerns the health and wellbeing of mothers from before pregnancy (pre-conception), during pregnancy (ante-natal), during and after childbirth (peri- and post-natal). Common impairments and activity limitations from obstetric fistulae, pelvic floor dysfunction, maternal depression and musculoskeletal disorders are outlined and examples of rehabilitation strategies are given. A case study of fistula in Burundi is reported.

Diabetes and rehabilitation. Factsheet.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

Expand view

Diabetes is the 9th most common cause of years lived with disability. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. This causes an increased concentration of glucose in the blood (hyper glycaemia). There are three types - Type 1, Type 2 and gestational. Common impairments and activity limitations are reported including: neuropathy; peripheral vascular disease; retinopathy; kidney complications; stroke and depression. Different examples of rehabilitation in the care continuum are provided. A case study of diabetes in the Philippines is cited.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and rehabilitation. Factsheet

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

Expand view

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) refers to conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels. Most commonly this includes coronary heart disease (heart attacks), cerebrovascular disease (stroke) or raised blood pressure (hypertension). A stroke occurs when a blood clot (ischaemia) or a bleed (haemorrhage) disrupts the blood supply to part of the brain, starving that area of oxygen. Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability. Common impairments and activity limitations from cardiovascular diseases are hemiplegia, word forming difficulties and slurring of speech, cognitive function, depression, sensory loss and shortness of breath. Different examples of rehabilitation in the care continuum are given. A case study of stroke in Nepal is provided. 

HIV & AIDS and rehabilitation. Factsheet.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

Expand view

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that makes the immune system collapse, making a person totally defenceless to infections. A person living with HIV may experience episodic and/or chronic impairments. These may result from illness and/or from treatment side effects, in particular: general fatigue and weight loss; neurological disorders; mental and cognitive disorders such as dementia; and joint and muscle problems. Different examples of rehabilitation across the care cycle are given. A case study in India is provided.
 

Road traffic injuries and rehabiliation. Factsheet.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

Expand view

The rate of road accidents is increasing globally and the resulting deaths, injuries, physical disabilities and psychological distress are creating a tremendous negative economic impact on victims, their families and society in general, especially in low and middle income countries. Common impairments and activity limitations from road traffic injuries are musculo-skeletal injuries, spinal cord injuries (SCI), traumatic brain injury and psychological distress and depression. Different examples of rehabilitation across the care cycle are provided. A case study of brain injury in Laos is provided. 

Child health and rehabilitation. Factsheet.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

Expand view

Child health encompasses physical, mental and social well-being of children under the age of five. The leading causes of under-five deaths are pre-term birth complications, pneumonia, birth asphyxia, diarrhoea and malaria. Malnutrition contributes to nearly half of all under-five deaths. All these conditions contribute hugely to child impairments too. Common impairments and activity limitations related to child health including birth defects, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, burns, falls and injuries and road traffic injuries are outlined and different examples of rehabilitation across the care cycle are given. A case study of cerebral palsy in Haiti is cited. 

Inclusive disaster risk reduction

LAFRENIERE, Annie
WALBAUM, Veronique
2017

Expand view

This policy paper defines the themes of inclusive disaster risk reduction and explains how these activities fit into the HI mandate. It also identifies the target population and defines modalities of intervention–standard expected outcomes, standard activities–as well as monitoring and evaluation indicators.

Pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in complex contexts (Togo, Madagascar and Syria)

CONICAVE, Jerome
TAN, Daniele
2017

Expand view

In January-October 2016, Handicap International carried out a pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in Togo, Madagascar and Syria. The aim of the study was to explore and test how physical rehabilitation services can be more accessible to people living in complex contexts via innovative technologies (such as 3D printing, treatment processes that use Internet technology and tools) and decentralised services by bringing them closer to the patients. This scientific summary provides the context, the objectives, the methodology, the results of the study, and perspectives for the future.

A number of technical appendices are available

RS/05

Situation of wage employment of people with disabilities (Ten developing countries in focus)

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
December 2016

Expand view

One of the fundamental rights that is often denied to persons with disabilities is the right to employment. Based on 35 years of work with persons with disabilities in more than 60 developing countries, Handicap International has decided to study this issue of employment and disability. It challenges ten developing country teams to reach out to their local partners to capture the reality of employment today. This qualitative study gives very useful information about country teams’ vision of decent work for persons with disabilities in those environments where specialized resources are rare and inclusive policies remain in their infancy. Despite many obstacles, it identifies some positive promises and future tracks for better practices and efficient services. Many stakeholders, like local business and employment bureaus, are piloting innovative ways to get people to work, and to retain their skills as this positive dynamic evolves. Bringing these experiences to different audiences is the main goal of this document. Hopefully it will be the first piece of a more comprehensive data set and bank of best practices that reinforce access to decent jobs for people with disabilities wherever they happen to live in our global world.

As the movement for cash transfer programming advances, how can we ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind in cash transfer programming for emergencies?

REDUC, Marie
PLA CORDERO, Ricardo
et al
December 2016

Expand view

A short review of the literature was carried out which derived some specific recommendations with regards to the needs of people with disabilities in cash transfer programming in the braod categories of: appropriate beneficiary targeting and assessment; accessibility of training and sensitisation materials; physical and sensorial access to markets, vendors and distributions points (including ATM); access to activities in cash for work; accessibility of technology; access to lost goods and services

LANDMINE MONITOR report 2016

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES – CLUSTER MUNITION COALITION (ICBL-CMC)
November 2016

Expand view

Landmine Monitor 2016 provides a global overview of the landmine situation. Chapters on developments in specific countries and other areas are available in online Country Profiles at www.the-monitor.org/cp. Landmine Monitor covers mine ban policy, use, production, trade, and stockpiling, and also includes information on contamination, clearance, casualties, victim assistance, and support for mine action. The report focuses on calendar year 2015, with information included up to November 2016 when possible. 

Achieving professional integration of young people with disabilities - Collection of good practices and shared experiences in Casablanca, Morocco

TORRECILLA, Audrey
November 2016

Expand view

This publication aims to analyze and disseminate good practices implemented throughout the project called "Improving access to employment for Young people with disabilities in the Greater Casablanca. " To assess the success of this project, it was needed to meet the people with disabilities that benefited from work placement in the companies. The following testimonies come from smiling, dynamic people who, thanks to a stable employment, are able to project into the future.Their disability has become "a detail": for their Colleagues, they are Anouar, Zineb, Mustafa, Anas, Yasmine ... competent staff who as everyone in the company brings an added value. Rabii And Sanaa, who both work as inclusion agents at the AMH Group and in the association called ANAÏS, contributed greatly to these personal and professional achievements. Every day they accompany, advise, facilitate training, prepare disabled young people for the labor market, but they also approach companies and propose nominations. The career paths exposed in this publication are encouraging towards continuing their efforts, along with ANAPEC and the other players at stake in the inclusion sector: not only professional, but also every Moroccan companies and the CGEM, to allow Young people with disabilities to access to stable and rewarding work places. As for the companies, the results speak for themselves: trained human resources departments, formalized action plans to implement disability policies, CSR targets achieved, and skilled employees providing added value to the teams.

Victim assistance in the context of the use of explosive weapons in populated areas

September 2016

Expand view

The international process underway to develop a political declaration on preventing civilian harm from the use of explosive weapons in populated areas is making good progress. Meanwhile, the International Network on Explosive Weapons (INEW) and other national and international organisations are working alongside leading governments to ensure the declaration will be comprehensive and will effectively meet the expectations of those suffering from the consequences of explosive weapons use around the world.

 

Wishing to contribute to the political declaration drafting process, Handicap International, supported by the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade,launched an initiative with a view to developing a shared understanding of the needs and rights of victims of explosive weapons and proposing recommendations on the provisions on victim assistance to be included in this declaration.Survivors, experts and humanitarian aid workers from countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan,Iraq, Jordan, South Sudan, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Palestine, as well as experts from several INEW member organisations, took part in this initiative. Together, they shared their experience of the reality faced by victims of explosive weapons in populated areas, expressed their aspirations for victim assistance provisions in the future political declaration and exchanged ideas by means of an online consultation and a workshop in Sarajevo.

 

This paper draws on these consultations to make the following recommendations, intended to ensure that the needs and rights of victims of explosive weapons will be adequately addressed in the future political declaration
 

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates