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Disability, CBR and inclusive development : Volume 28, No.1, Spring 2017

2017

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Titles of research articles in this issue of the journal are:

  • Community Action Research in Disability (CARD): An inclusive research programme in Uganda
  • The Impact of Community-Based Rehabilitation in a Post-Conflict Environment of Sri Lanka
  • Communication Disability in Fiji: Community Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes
  • The Search for Successful Inclusion
  • Effect of Music Intervention on the Behaviour Disorders of Children with Intellectual Disability using Strategies from Applied Behaviour Analysis
  • The Effects of Severe Burns on Levels of Activity

 

The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: a Literature Review

YOUNG, Rebekah
REEVE, Mathew
GRILLS, Nathan
December 2016

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to review peer-reviewed literature on the roles and functions of Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries, and their outputs and outcomes for people with disabilities.

Method: Online databases were searched without date or language limiters (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane), using a combination of two key word search strategies. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included studies underwent quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and Downs and Black’asss criteria for quality assessment. Data for thematic analysis was then grouped under the broad themes of: participation and factors that facilitate participation; development of partnerships and connections; and self-development and self-help.

Results: There was some evidence within the included studies to suggest that DPOs can produce significant, positive outcomes for persons with disability in terms of factors such as employment rates, access to microfinance and bank loans, accessibility of housing, acquisition of orthopaedic devices, involvement in civil society, development of friendships and networks, and participation in training programmes. Although the studies under review largely did not investigate the long-term impact of the reported DPO functions and outputs, some of the short-term outputs may be considered proximal indicators of outcomes such as increased empowerment and well-being. Conclusion: The 11 studies in this review suggested that DPOs can be effective in achieving their stated aims of promoting well-being, participation and rights of people with disabilities in low and middle- income countries.
 

Users’ satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: A cross-sectional study

DURHAM, Jo
SYCHAREUN, Vanphanom
SANTISOUK, Phonevilay
et al
December 2016

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"Abstract

 

Purpose: User satisfaction with assistive devices is a predictor of use and an important outcome measure. This study evaluated client satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices and services in three provinces in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

 

Method: A cross-sectional study was done, using the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology questionnaire. The sample was drawn from the client register of three of the five Rehabilitation Centres in the country which are under the Ministry of Health’s Centre for Medical Rehabilitation. Clients were eligible if they had received their device in the 12 months prior to the study. Based on the number of registered clients, the sample size was calculated as 274 with a 95% confidence interval, with the final sample N = 266. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were also conducted (N = 34).

 

Results: Most of the assistive devices were in use at the time of the survey and were reported to be in good condition (n = 177, 66.5%). The total mean score for satisfaction (services and device combined) was 3.80 (SD 0.55). Statistically significant differences were observed in satisfaction between gender and location of residence. Effectiveness and comfort were rated as the two most important factors when using a device; at the same time, these were the most common reasons for dissatisfaction and sub-optimal use.

 

Conclusion and Implications: Clients were quite satisfied with the assistive device and services provided, yet many reported barriers to optimal device use and difficulties in accessing follow-up services. There is a need to examine how prosthetic and orthotic devices can be improved further for better comfort and ambulation on uneven ground in low-resource contexts and to address access barriers."

Disability, CBR and inclusive development - Vol 27, No 3 (2016) Autumn 2016

December 2016

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Table of content

 

 

Original Research Articles

 

Exploring the Complexities of Leprosy-related Stigma and the Potential of a Socio-economic Intervention in a Public Health Context in Indonesia PDF
Dadun Dadun, Ruth Peters, Mimi Lusli, Beatriz Miranda-Galarza, Wim van Brakel, Marjolein Zweekhorst, Rita Damayanti, Irwanto Irwanto, Joske Bunders 5-23

Users’ Satisfaction with Prosthetic and Orthotic Assistive Devices in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: A Cross-sectional Study PDF
Jo Durham, Vanphanom Sychareun, Phonevilay Santisouk, Kongmany Chaleunvong 24-44

The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: A Literature Review PDF
Rebekah Young, Matthew Reeve, Nathan Grills 45-71

Physiotherapy Care for Adults with Paraplegia due to Traumatic Cause: A Review PDF
Nalina Gupta, Kavitha Raja 72-86

Supporting Parents in Caring for Children with Disability in Ghana PDF
Joyce den Besten, Marije Tebogo Cornielje, Huib Cornielje, David Norden Botwey 87-101

Quality of Life among Persons with Paraplegic Spinal Cord Injury PDF
Md. Shofiqul Islam, Humayra Jahan, Mohammad Sohrab Hossain, Md. Fazlul Karim Patwary 102-117

 

 

Brief reports

 

Impact of Long-term Use of Adaptive Seating Device among Children with Cerebral Palsy and their Families in Mumbai, India: A feasibility study PDF
Swati Ashok Kurne, Anita Dipak Gupta 118-131

Community-Based Rehabilitation for Children with Intellectual Disability: A Case Study of Endosulfan Affected Areas in India PDF - Anzu Augustine

 

Disability, CBR and inclusive development - Vol 27, No 4 (2016) Winter 2016

December 2016

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8 articles

Original Research Articles

Social Inclusion and Mental Health of Children with Physical Disabilities in Gaza, Palestine PDF
Khaled Nasser, Malcolm MacLachlan, Joanne McVeigh 5-36

CBR Workers' Training Needs for People with Communication Disability PDF
Choo Er Yeap, Hasherah Ibrahim, Sandra Vandort, Kartini Ahmad, Md Syahrulikram Yasin 37-54

Educational Concerns of Students with Hearing Impairment in Secondary and Higher Secondary Classes in Mumbai, India PDF
Dipak Kumar Aich, Suni Mariam Mathew 55-75

Advocacy Campaign for the Rights of People with Disabilities: A Participatory Action Research within a Community-based Rehabilitation Project in Vangani, Maharashtra PDF
Atul Jaiswal, Shikha Gupta 76-92

Effectiveness of Role Play and Bibliotherapy in Attitude Change of Primary School Pupils towards Learners with Special Needs in Nigeria PDF
Nwachukwu Ezechinyere Kingsley 93-105

 

Reviews

Disability Data Collection in Community-based Rehabilitation PDF
Sunil Deepak, Franesca Ortali, Geraldine Mason Halls, Tulgamaa Damdinsuren, Enhbuyant Lhagvajav, Steven Msowoya, Malek Qutteina, Jayanth Kumar 106-123

 

Brief reports

Differences in Malaria Prevention between Children with and without a Disability in the Upper East Region of Ghana PDF
Fleur Frieda Cornelia Muires, Evi Sarah Broekaart 124-137

Demographic Profile of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): A Hospital-based Prospective study in Bangladesh PDF
Atma Razzak, Rajkumar Roy, Shamim Khan

Disability Data Collection in Community-based Rehabilitation

Sunil Deepak
Francesca Ortali
Geraldine Mason Halls
Tulgamaa Damdinsuren
Enhbuyant Lhagvajav
Steven Msowoya
Malek Qutteina
Jayanth Kumar
December 2016

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Today there are Community-based Rehabilitation (CBR) programmes in a large number of countries. In many countries, the CBR approach is a part of the national rehabilitation services. However, there is a lack of reliable data about persons with disabilities who benefit from CBR and the kind of benefits they receive. This article reviews the disability data collection systems and presents some case studies to understand the influence of operational factors on data collection in the CBR programmes. The review shows that most CBR programmes use a variable number of broad functional categories to collect information about persons with disabilities, combined occasionally with more specific diagnostic categories. This categorisation is influenced by local contexts and operational factors, including the limitations of human and material resources available for its implementation, making it difficult to have comparable CBR data. Therefore, any strategies to strengthen the data collection in CBR programmes must take these operational factors into account.

 

 

Disability, CBR and inclusive development (DCID) - Vol 27, No 4 (2016)

THOMAS, Maya
Ed
2016

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"Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development aim to enhance knowledge in the field of disability, addressing the needs of practitioners in the field (particularly those from developing countries), policy makers, disabled persons’ organizations and the scientific community. The journal encourages publication of information that is evidence-based, to improve current knowledge and programmes implementation, and will be openly and freely accessible to all readers" ”Published four times a year, previously published two times per year
Free

Social inclusion and mental health of children with physical disabilities in Gaza, Palestine

NASSER, Khaled
MACLACHLAN, Malcolm
MCVEIGH, Joanne
November 2016

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"Social inclusion of children with physical disabilities is essential for their mental health. The long-standing conflict and political instability in Palestine since 1948 has resulted in an unprecedented number of children with disabilities. This study aimed to assess social inclusion and mental health of children with physical disabilities in Palestine. Method: A mixed methods research design was used. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Brief Assessment of Social Inclusion for Children with Disability (BASIC-D) were administered to 100 children with amputations, 12-18 years of age, in the Gaza Strip. Ten semi-structured interviews were also conducted with personnel working across civil society rehabilitation services in the area, particularly in services that focussed on the physical rehabilitation of children who had lost a limb"

Sexual violence against women with disabilities in Ghana: Accounts of women with disabilities from Ashanti Region

OPOKU, Maxwell Peprah
et al
2016

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This exploratory study aimed to document the causes and consequences of sexual violence against women with disabilities in Mampong Municipality of Ashanti region in Ghana. The 41 participants, made up of women living with intellectual, visual and hearing disabilities, were interviewed using convenience and snowball sampling techniques

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development (formerly Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal) Vol. 27, No.2, 2016

The Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in Primary Care: Findings of Exploratory Implementation Throughout Life

PRINZIE, Peter
LEBEER, Jo
et al
2016

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"This study suggests that a creative implementation of the ICF during life course to everyone who uses universally accessible healthcare may strengthen the integrative functions of Primary Care, and may be at the heart of the information system of this essential part of the healthcare system. Further research on the complementary use of ICF and ICD-10 is suggested in order to support community-based multisectoral intervention which may be coordinated by Primary Care." 

The functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries: A literature review

YOUNG, Rebekah
REEVE, Matthew
GRILLS, Nathan
October 2016

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"The aim of this study was to review peer-reviewed literature on the roles and functions of Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries, and their outputs and outcomes for people with disabilities. Online databases were searched without date or language limiters (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane), using a combination of two key word search strategies. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included studies underwent quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and Downs and Black’s criteria for quality assessment. Data for thematic analysis was then grouped under the broad themes of: participation and factors that facilitate participation; development of partnerships and connections; and self-development and self-help"

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Vol 27, No 3 (2016)

 

 

Physiotherapy care for adults with paraplegia due to traumatic cause: A review

GUPTA, Nalina
RAJA, Kavitha
October 2016

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Abstract

 

 

Purpose: This review aimed to identify the practice guidelines/ recommendations for physiotherapy management in acute /post-acute/ chronic/long-term phase of rehabilitation of clients with paraplegia due to traumatic causes.

 

 

Methods: Of the 120 articles retrieved, 26 met the inclusion criteria. After quality appraisal, 16 articles were included in the study. Data were extracted under the sub-headings: physiotherapy care in acute, chronic and long-term community stage; expected outcomes; effect of physical interventions; morbidities; wheelchair characteristics and standing.

 

Results: There is strong evidence in support of strength and fitness training, and gait training. Parameters of strength training (frequency, duration and intensity) vary. There is lack of evidence on passive movements, stretching, bed mobility, transfers and wheelchair propulsion. Preservation of upper limb functions is an important consideration in caring for clients with paraplegia.

 

Conclusion: Many areas of rehabilitation interventions remain inadequately explored and there is a need for high quality studies on rehabilitation protocols. Client preferences and feasibility are other areas that should be explored.

 

Limitations: The search criteria of articles in the English language or articles translated in English is a reason for this limitation. Articles related to advanced therapeutic interventions such as robot-assisted training, and transcranial electrical and magnetic stimulation were excluded from the study.

Community-based rehabilitation in a post-soviet environment in Azerbaijan : where society meets ideology

BURCHELL, Gwen
November 2015

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“This paper explores UAFA’s [United Aid for Azerbaijan] experience, since 2002, in working with Azerbaijani stakeholders to move from the medical approach to disability, propagated by the Soviet model of planning and implementation, to a social, community-based approach. The paper highlights the common misconceptions and how these can be overcome, including the policy gaps that challenge effective implementation. The importance of creating and maintaining a core team is discussed, alongside the process that UAFA has developed for building up teams of CBR [Community Based Rehabilitation] workers. Finally, the paper raises the issue of introducing outcomes-based evaluation in a society that has no such prior experience, followed by an account of the continual challenge faced by most programmes–namely, how to achieve sustainable funding”

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 26, No 3

A 10-year literature review of the impact of community based rehabilitation

BOWERS, Bob
KUIPERS, Pim
DORSETT, Pat
2015

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This paper is a thematic 10-year literature review of the impact of community based rehabilitation. “The review covered the period from 2002 to 2012, and the CBR Matrix was utilised to provide structure for the evidence. Seven studies that investigated the impact of CBR interventions in developing countries were included. A modified harvest plot was used to summarise the strength and nature of evidence provided in relation to the CBR Matrix. Quantitative studies tended to focus on the Health domain, while qualitative studies generally focused on the Social and Empowerment domains. No evidence of CBR impact was found in the Education domain, and very little evidence was found pertaining to Livelihood. Overall, the evidence base related to the impact of CBR remains limited, both in terms of quantity and robustness of design”

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development (DCID), Vol 26, No 2

The evolution of community physiotherapy in India

RAJAN, Pavithra
February 2014

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Despite the urgent need for physiotherapy services for underprivileged communities, Community Physiotherapy is not a sought-after specialisation in India. Physiotherapists tend to serve in institutions rather than at community level, as a result of which this field of healthcare has stagnated. This article, based on an interview with one of the country’s eminent community physiotherapists, gives a first person account of the evolution of community physiotherapy in India and provides qualitative inputs to deal with the prevalent issues. While the need for services has increased, there has been no matching growth in the pool of physiotherapists willing to work in the community. Several recommendations have been made, including changes in approach to community physiotherapy by both physiotherapists as well as community organisations in India.

Perceived needs related to social participation of people with leprosy-related disabilities and other people with disabilities in Cambodia : a qualitative study

HEEREN, Marie-Julie J
KY, Lai
VAN BRAKEL, Wim H
January 2014

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The objective of this study was to describe the similarities and differences in perceived needs related to social participation of persons with leprosy-related disabilities and other persons with disabilities in Cambodia, and to suggest key interventions to promote participation in the community. A cross-sectional study was completed by conducting a pilot-tested, face-to-face semi-structured interviews, with open and closed questions, and focus group discussions to investigate the perceived needs related to social and economic participation in the community. The study found that both groups of people with disabilities have similar needs to improve participation in social and economic life, and the authors suggest that it is best to form multi-disability self-help groups to empower all the affected people and help fight poverty

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal, Vol 25, No 3

Community-based rehabilitation programme evaluations : lessons learned in the field

GRANDISSON, Marie
2014

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“There is limited guidance available on the best ways to evaluate community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes. In this paper, we share lessons learned on suitable evaluation strategies for CBR through a South African programme evaluation. At the end of the field visit, parents, staff members and managers provided feedback anonymously about what they liked and disliked about the evaluation, and offered their suggestions”

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol. 25, No. 1

Impact of community-based rehabilitation on persons with different disabilities

DEEPAK, Sunil
et al
2013

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“There are some barriers that persons with different kinds of impairments commonly face, and there are also some impairment-specific barriers. Disaggregated data are needed to assess the impact of different CBR activities on different groups of persons with disabilities. This article assesses the impact of CBR on key variables linked to the five domains of the CBR Matrix, on 4 groups of persons with disabilities - visual, hearing and speech, physical and intellectual disabilities. A questionnaire survey was carried out involving 2,332 persons with disabilities, in a random stratified sample of villages covered by a CBR programme, in 9 sub-districts of Karnataka state (India) and in a control area”

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol. 24, No. 4

Impact assessment of a vocational training programme for persons with disabilities in Bangladesh

NURI, Reshma Parvin
et al
2012

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“The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a vocational training programme in enabling 261 persons with disabilities to find employment in Bangladesh. A qualitative method, which employed interviews and focus group discussions, assessed the effect of the training programme on key individual, societal and physical factors set out by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (2001)”

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 23, No 3

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