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Inspiring futures : learning from memory work in Africa

DUNN, Alison
HAMMOND WARD, Sarah
2009

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This learning paper looks at the experiences of applying memory work as part of broader strategies to mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS in five African countries. It explores how six NGOs in sub-Saharan Africa established memory work as a key component of their community-based HIV programmes and draws on the experience of people living with HIV and AIDS, children and young people who participated in the initiative, partner organisations' own learning and analysis and the end of project evaluation report

Memory work : which way now?

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2008

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This learning paper considers how memory work makes a difference in people’s lives, how issues around sustaining and scaling up the approach are important to its continuation, and why, even with increased access to antiretroviral treatment, memory work still remains vital

Changing children's lives : experiences from memory work in Africa

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2007

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This publication aims to share learning from the memory work that Healthlink Worldwide and six other NGOs across sub-Saharan Africa have developed in response to the HIV epidemic. The focus is on learning and analysis in the theory and practice of memory work as well as demonstrating its effectiveness as an HIV response. It is aimed at international and national level policy makers who design and support HIV initiatives, as well as practitioners, who implement responses to the HIV epidemic directly at a local and national level

Treatment literacy : empowering communities to access AIDS treatment

DUNN, Alison
October 2006

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This paper explores the contribution of information and communication strategies to universal access to anti-retroviral treatment. It suggests that people taking antiretroviral drugs and their supporters need to understand new and complex ideas around drugs, side effects, nutrition and positive living. Treatment literacy aims to help individuals and communities understand why ARV treatment is needed, and what it can and cannot do. Effective treatment literacy, developed by or with people living with HIV and AIDS and those taking ART, can lead to improved health outcomes, better adherence to drug regimes and higher uptake of voluntary counselling and testing. Current resources and community capacity to understand and support antiretroviral therapy are not sufficient

Electronic resource for media on HIV and AIDS

DAVIES, Jackie
July 2006

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The past two decades have seen the advent of two significant global developments: the spread of HIV and AIDS, and the creation of the Internet. Both of these factors have had a profound effect on many societies, and both are areas of conflict and controversy. An increasing number of media support organisations are using the Internet to provide information and training resources to media workers in developing countries. These electronic resources, or e-resources, are aimed at assisting media to produce effective communication about HIV and AIDS. But are e-resources relevant, how are they being developed and what factors need to be considered to ensure they are effective? This paper aims to explore these questions by examining the HIV and AIDS communication context for local media, and their information and communication needs. E-resources for HIV and AIDS communication are briefly outlined, and gaps and challenges identified; and finally conclusions and recommendations are presented

The river of hope : child-centred approaches to HIV and AIDS. A resource manual for working with children and their communities

CARNEGIE, Rachel
KATO-KABUNGA, Paul
CHILD-CENTRED APPROACHES TO HIV AND AIDS (CCATH) PROJECT PARTNERS
2006

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This resource manual has been written for people working with children and young people (aged 8-18) in communities affected by HIV and AIDS. It was developed by organisations in the Kenya, Uganda and the UK as part of a project on Child-Centred approaches to HIV and AIDS. The manual aims to provide a resource of ideas, experiences and practical activities that will encourage children and young people to help each other understand and cope with the impact of HIV and AIDS

Scaling up memory work : the example of KIWAKKUKI in Tanzania

WARD, Nicola
ITEMBA, Dafrosa
2006

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Scaling up the memory work and extending it from Uganda to other African countries involved many challenges due to the wide range of different contexts, different types of implementing organisations and different cultures. This edition of Health Exchange gives an example from Tanzania where the organisation KIWAKKUKI, has developed a memory project based on experience and learning from NACWOLA in Uganda, but adapted to its specific cultural and organisational context

Starting to do memory work : a guide to the stages of implementation

WARD, Nicola
HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2006

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This brief guide is based on the experience of the National Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (NACWOLA) and initial experiences of the International Memory Project. It will be useful for non-governmental organisations and community-based organisations interested in starting memory work

Linking research : policy and practice to improve equity in health care in Malawi. REACH : challenging barriers to health care

DUNN, Alison
August 2005

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This briefing paper considers the findings of research conducted by REACH, an independent research trust in Malawi, on poverty and access to health care services at community level. It looks at the processes used by REACH to communicate findings into policy and practice. These include developing relationships with policymakers to enhance ownership of the research process, advocating research findings at policy fora, presenting findings generated by a range of research methods, and strategically framing the research in different discourses (eg poverty, gender) depending on the audience

Participation of disabled people in the PRSP/PEAP process in Uganda

DUBE, Andrew K
2005

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Disabled people have been neglected in programmes for poverty allevation. Uganda was one of the first countries to develop a poverty reducation strategy paper (PRSP) and also started to include disabled people into the follow up phases. This report shows the challenges that the disability movements in Uganda and other African countries are facing in the processes of poverty allevation programmes. It seeks to document the experience in Uganda to draw out lessons for other countries going through PRSP processes.

Lessons from the Disability Knowledge and Research (KaR) Programme

ALBERT, Bill
2005

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This publication summarises the findings and broader 'lessons learned' from the Disability KaR programme (2003-2005). The programme developed a strong focus on mainstreaming disability in development, saw partnerships grow between organisations in developed and developing countries, and saw disabled people taking a lead in research

Mainstreaming disability in development : lessons from gender mainstreaming

MILLER, Carol
ALBERT, Bill
2005

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This document uses gender mainstreaming as a template to assess how successfully disability has been brought into the mainstream, and how to promote disability equality. With a specific emphasis on the work and practices of DFID, it identifies eight key lessons from gender mainstreaming that can be applied to disability in development: develop clear institutional policy on disability equality; devise robust institutional structures capable of promoting a disability agenda; sustain an appropriate institutional culture; facilitate policy-relevant research and information; provide adequate guidelines and tools; promote the involvement of people with disabilities; carry out monitoring and evaluation activities

A final evaluation of the project on child-centered approaches to HIV and AIDS 2000-2004

CARNEGIE, Rachel
BROWN, Christiana
August 2004

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This is the final evaluation report of the Child-Centered approaches to HIV/AIDS (CCATH) project which was funded by Comic Relief for the years 2000-2004. This report synthesizes the findings from two independent evaluations and from the participatory evaluation undertaken by the CCATH project partners and the communities with whom they work. Project interventions included: Memory Project work; life skills education and seminars for parents/guardians and children to improve dialogue; Child-to-Child activities in schools promoting communication amongst children and with their teachers; sensitisation and advocacy activities in communities and at national level. The report finds that these initiatives have helped break the silence around HIV/AIDS, strengthen children's coping skills, reduce stigma and discrimination, influence policy makers on child-centered issues around HIV/AIDS and share learning from the project. This report is a particularly good example of a child-sensitive methodology applied to evaluation

Using electronic communication to strengthen HIV/AIDS work

LEE, Sarah
November 2003

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Describes the various forms that electronic communications (also called information and communication technologies - ICTs) can have (for example email, databases, CD-ROMs etc) and their uses (advocacy, networking, discussions, fundraising). Lists the advantages and disadvantages of electronic communications, and includes a list of resources, articles and reports around ICTs and development

Poverty, health and disability

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
November 2003

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This is a series of articles on poverty, disability and health, which includes a look at community approaches to disability in Bangladesh and further resource lists

Resource centre manual : how to set up and manage a resource centre

O'SULLIVAN, Sheila
et al
2003

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Contains practical information on all aspects of setting up and managing a resource centre, from planning, fundraising and finding a suitable location, to collecting and organising materials, developing information services, and monitoring and evaluating the work of the resource centre. It assumes that most readers will use manual systems for organising information, but also explains how computers can be used in resource centres, including e-mail, Internet and databases. It describes how to select database software, and contains a detailed review of three leading database programs. It includes a list of organisations and publications that can provide further information

Perspectives on disability, poverty and technology : a report to Healthlink Worldwide and GIC Ltd

ALBERT, Bill
MCBRIDE, Rob
SEDDON, David
September 2002

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This paper sets out an approach to disability and development based on the social model of disability. It states that national and international statistics on the incidence of physical and/or mental impairment provides a partial and often misleading notion of the social reality of disability in developing countries. They should therefore not be used to gauge the needs of disabled people or to estimate the costs or benefits of programmes. The paper argues for the need to formulate an integrated strategy towards disability and development. It recommends that specific criteria be adopted for judging project concept notes and proposals and makes recommendations regarding the choice and weighting of criteria. It also provides a set of recommendations for: DFID in general; DFID in relation to its Disability Knowledge and Research (KaR) programme; the Disability KaR programme managers; further work to be undertaken

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